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Mike215

Pickets, runners and slings?

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Hopefully this isnt on the already been awnsered list lol. I've thumbed through Freedom of the Hills, google, youtube and this forum. I am having a little trouble understaning how to pick the way one attaches to a picket.

 

I get what the picket is and its use, but what kind of sling do people use? Is this all personal preference? What length to use and when? Why? Input on this and what you personally use would be helpful. Thanks.

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the longer the better. clip the sling to the lowest hole on the picket you can dig through soft snow to get to. IE, the picket should be cantilevered vertically as little as possible. Dig a trench for the runner so that it runs free, downhill, towards the direction of a possible fall. This keeps the sling from popping the runner up and out.

 

If the snow is so soft that a picket isn't going to hold when placed vertically, either stow it (you probably don't need it) or deadman it if you need it to provide security for a more technical ground above or below.

Edited by tvashtarkatena

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They'll all be stronger than your picket, so any of them will do. Just quickly check the knots and tails on your tied runners every time you use them to avoid surprises. Don't tie non-nylon (dyneema, etc) webbing - it slips too much.

 

RE daisy chains - you can adjust the length of your anchor attachment by clove hitching (easily adjustable) the rope to a locking biner clipped to a fixed length runner. Daisy chains are very tangly and kind of a pain in the arse.

Edited by tvashtarkatena

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Off topic, but a webolette (Metolius makes em), 2 biners, and a locking biner properly used make for a quick, full (except for the locking biner at the power point) redundancy anchor kit.

Edited by tvashtarkatena

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the longer the better. clip the sling to the lowest hole on the picket you can dig through soft snow to get to. IE, the picket should be cantilevered vertically as little as possible. Dig a trench for the runner so that it runs free, downhill, towards the direction of a possible fall. This keeps the sling from popping the picket up and out.

 

Pickets are quite useful. The above gives good info. The main concern is getting them in so they do not cantilever out when loaded. I pound them suckers in deep cause often the top snow/nevé/ice is crap. Also as said if you dig trench for the sling/cable to sit in all the better. All of my pickets have permanent wire cables on them which will cut into the softer top layers.

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24" picket

48" sling girth hitched onto it

Knot tied in the sling at the mid-point

Locking carabiner on the sling.

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24" picket

48" sling girth hitched onto it

Knot tied in the sling at the mid-point

Locking carabiner on the sling.

 

Ditto.

:tup::tup:

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Careful with daisy chains. Each loop is only rated to 3kn/670lbs, typically. The daisy end-to-end is full strength, but if you were to blow through those loops you can shock load the system (bouncy climber ascending the rope).

 

The PAS is a much better alternative as each loop is full strength.

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Knot tied in the sling at the mid-point

Locking carabiner on the sling.

Are you referring to using a picket for an anchor to belay or rappel, as opposed to running pro?

If pro, why the knot and why the locker?

Edited by pcg

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A stab at this...

 

double length sling because it's more versatile

 

tie a knot so that you can quickly make it into a single if desired (and you can clip it back or just leave it

 

I think this is just rigging a picket that can be used for all of this - whether it's an anchor for belay, pro or rappel

 

The girth hitch is to remove a biner - I think the only thing I'd add Kurt is that you make sure the aluminum hole in the picket isn't sharp for any reason...

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I tie a knot in the sling (near the end) so that I can clip the biner (on the end) to the opposite end of the picket. it just keeps things tiddy. this allows you to carry the picket easily over the shoulder, crosswise across the body.

 

locker is for the chance that you will need to clip a person onto the one picket. amongst other reasons too.

Edited by genepires

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gene is that knot near the end to keep the sling from traveling around through that biner that's clipped to the other end?

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gene is that knot near the end to keep the sling from traveling around through that biner that's clipped to the other end?

 

yes sir.

 

tie the knot in the middle must have some positive rational that I am not aware of yet. must be part of some newer guides practice or something. I am curious.

 

maybe tie a knot in the middle and the end?

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i think all i've seen about a knot in the middle was quickly making it into a single length as opposed to a double length very quickly (basically, it's always both that way and then just choosing where to clip your biner into.

 

as far as a "keeper knot" which seems like the smaller knot would be - ain't a bad idea at all. never used it myself but kinda nice if you're grabbing at the biner with big gloves.

 

good call

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