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B Deleted_Beck

Run pace

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I'm sure some people do. As for me, I run to stay in shape for the mountains. When I run it's on hills or stairs or trails every time, so whatever pace I may or may not have is meaningless in comparison to what I think you're asking.

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Mt Si has been done in around 37 min. to the the base of the haystack. Mix up running at an 8 minute per mile pace with stairs or hiking 4 mph with fair vertical. Adjust accordingly according to your own fast twitch/slow twitch muscle fibers ratio and motivation. There are some very fit people on this site and their goals may not be the same as yours.

 

Edited by matt_warfield

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Why?

 

I started writing a lengthy response, then remembered that I'm really running for myself right now - not really spraying about it. And I remembered that last time I started spraying about stuff, I lost my enthusiasm for doing it.

Edited by chris

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Why?

 

I started writing a lengthy response, then remembered that I'm really running for myself right now - not really spraying about it. And I remembered that last time I started spraying about stuff, I lost my enthusiasm for doing it.

 

This is why I stopped writing TRs and posting climb albums on Facebook...

 

I should have added additional information request... such as age, what your routine looks like, and why you run, I guess.

 

So to "why," - I'm just curious to see where I stack up to other climbers. I'm not necessarily wanting to change or improve my own times, but if I see that other early- 30-somethings who run 1-2 times a week 3-6 miles per run with the occasional 12-miler and climb 1-2 times a month are averaging closer to 6:30 pace, then I might consider asking "what are you doing to keep that kind of pace up?" So that I can improve on my 7:20.

 

If I see that guys at my age and level are pretty close, or slower, I'll try to be a little more content.

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Here's an example from today...

 

Ran the Dirty Half with my wife, pretty much off the couch... and my time certainly reflected that (2:45). My main climbing partner has been training for three months, and he ran it a whole hour faster than myself. I ran so slow I almost missed the Taco Stand burritos at the end.

 

My goals were very different than my friends, I wanted to run with my wife, drink beers, and have a smile on my face the whole time. He wanted to beat his wifes PR.

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How much does run pace correlate to speed in the mountains? Other than if you're fantastically fit or grossly out of shape having a bearing on both.. For instance I don't run at all but am of average speed compared to range of people I've climbed with, handful faster and handful slower. Some of the slower are runners.

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I'm just curious to see where I stack up ... my 7:20.

 

If I see that guys at my age and level are pretty close, or slower, I'll try to be a little more content.

 

If you are running to keep in shape for climbing, it really doesn't matter how fast your running pace is. You will only be as fast as your partner. If you can't keep up with your partners then you need to train more. That said, one of the fastest climbers I have climbed with is Colin Haley who doesn't run because it hurts his knees.

 

I have run competitively for 30 year so I do care about my pace when running. I also cared a lot about climbing fast when my daughter was young because it was much easier to get a day free than a whole weekend and if I climbed fast I could climb longer routes. Now that my daughter is in grad school I really like to bivi. Camping out is part of the fun for me.

 

As for where you stack up, you don't mention what your 7:20 pace is for. A road marathon? If so then 7:20 is not a bad pace for a recreational runner. To put it in perspective I worked with a guy who decided to run a marathon for his 40th birthday. He had never run more than 6 miles in his life. He was a typical desk jockey with a wife and kid. He did the Portland marathon in 2:54.

 

As for climbers, you are not notably fast. You are not slow either. The fastest climber is the one having the most fun. Or something like that. Have fun running and climbing but if you start hiring timing officials to record your lap up Mt Hood, maybe step back a bit.

 

 

 

 

Edited by DPS

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Hey Ben,

 

As some have pointed it, what you're asking is a real broad question. For example, myself, in current shape run 5:05/mile for 5k and 5:30/mile for 10k. But just recovery/easy days, I run anywhere from 6:30 to 7 pace for 3-6 miles. My current long run is 10-12 miles, usually at 6:30 to 6:40 pace over hilly terrain. As for training for mountain climbing, it is not incredibly sport specific, at least in my experience. I remember when I was competing in xc/track in college and would get hammered when I tried to do a car to car alpine day.

 

Anyway, I'm a big believer (and bias) that running, if your body tolerates it, is a great way to build general fitness. You're working your cardiorespiratory system and making your body adapt to the stress that is spending large amounts of time on your legs and feet.

 

As far a general running pace, for a person who is not looking to race but just train for the mountains I believe there should be three types of runs, which can be combined. One, just general easy/recovery days, which should be jogging pace and you should finish the run feeling like you can run more. Next would be tempo or lactate threshold pace. This should feel like you're moving fast and putting in a good effort, but not make you go anaerobic. Finally is hills! Hills are good for everyone and everything so run them often.

 

That was a long ramble...

You may find this useful:

http://www.runbayou.com/jackd.htm

Edited by kevino

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Add a regular weight training program directly after your runs.

consult a trainer

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HS - 4:33 mile, 14:40 cross country 3 mi

 

College - 4:22 mi

 

37 yrs old - 2:42 marathon

 

40th birthday - Stuart trail head to Snow Lake parking lot - 3:50

 

Close to 60 now - don't run except occassional trial run/walks and stair workouts.

 

Hard on body but I really miss it.

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