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Greg_W

Scarpa Frenney - How they rate???

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I'm looking for a boot that will take crampons, isn't super-heavy, that I can for spring and summer. MEC bills these boots as "lightweight". Anybody have comments on durability? Comfort level? Et cetera?

 

TIA,

 

Greg W

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I've been looking into new boots latel also.

 

I'd say thet are more medium weight. They are pretty bomber durablity wise. But I have heard the suck to walk long distances in because they don't have much rocker.

 

Take a look at the Trango S, or Extreme. Both are lighter. The Extreme is probably beter than the S for wet snowy conditions.

 

Kayland makes an awsome boot also, too bad Feathered Friends stopped carrying them.

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I got em I like em. I broke them to my feet by hiking twice to Prusik last yr. They blistered me big time but are now broken in fine. They are great with the bent crampons like M10s or Grivel Rambos. Waterproofing is best to use SnowSeal or some type of wax and liberally reapply (even if you are conservative).

 

In summer, lighter than p;lastic boos for doing those multipitch rockclimbs with a glacier approach is the reason i bought em.

 

However I find that together with the crampon, they excel for ice. Like switching from a mitten to a glove, much better sensitivity and control.

 

A friend borrowed them last year after he forgot his boots at home. We did Night N Gale and it was -15C out for most of the day. Perhaps because the boots were a bit small for him, he frostbit a big toe and ended up losing the nail. Anyways if its really cold out i would still prefer plastics. Also its harder to ski in them for mtneering approaches I think.

 

Do not get the red freneys (Freney Light or something) except for summer-only use is what i hear, more of a competitior with LS Trango than an ice boot.

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I'm looking at them for the same reason, Dru. So, the red ones that MEC sells are a "lite" version of the blue ones I've seen? That's good to know. So, Dru, you have the blue ones?

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Ya Ive got the blue ones. Now that they are broken in I can and have done 16 hr days with them on, no blisters. I think getting them wet helps to break them in. They are definitely more of a mountaineering/pure ice boot than the various Trangos Lammy was mentioning which IMHO are more for crag sport ice and/or summer mtneering like for approaches not for 3000' north faces.

 

They'd be, for instance, perfect for a summer/fall ascent of the Central Couloir of Joffre. If I was gonna take boots to the Bugaboos, Id probably go with something lighter. Comprende?

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If you dont plan to ice climb at all in them, you might be able to go with something lighter like Lammy suggrests. They were definite factor in my taking 3 attempts to climb Prussik, like what was I thinking to wear them??? cantfocus.gif

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There are many great boots being made nowadays. The bottom line remains whether they fit your foot, or not.

I'm partial to Tecnica boots because they fit and they're light (I've got a pair of Altitude Plus. The Bio-Flex GTX is well regarded). Also, the company has been very kind to me whereas other companies were rude.

 

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Freney's weren't designed for approaches. They were designed with pure climbing in mind. In the alps with short approaches they are great. In the Cascades they are a nightmare. I've had a pair for 2 years.

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You might look at the Scarpa Cerro Torre. Light and insulated. I have the trango extremes which are light, climb great, suck on appoaches as most boots do (thats why I usually take a pair of running shoes). They fit narrow feet good, if you have wide feet you might want to avoid them.

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I've got the Cerro Torres, the yellow ones. I think the insulated Cerro Torres that Highlander's talking about are red. They're pretty burly boots and my feet have stayed dry without me having to sno-seal them yet. I've climbed ice, snow, and easy rock in them fairly comfortably, though they still hurt my weirdly-shaped heels.

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Lambone - I heard Kaylands were for a mid to large volume foot. Is this true? I have a low-volume (thin) long foot.

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You ask about a spring/summer boot good for crampons and glaciers and thn alpine rock. My recommendation is the regular Trango, no insulation needed. Insulation just adds bulk, weight and something else to dry out. I've used the Trango a lot, very comfortable for approach trails, supportive for steep dirt, heather, scree and a great edging, jamming and friction boot. I love it.

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I have odd-shaped feet and the Kaylands fit me well so maybe they fit people with odd-shaped feet (uh, where's the logic in that?). But they're grrreat boots. Hike great, climb better than they hike, but since the sole is fairly thin custom insoles would probably help a lot.

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