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kevbone

Fixed Anchors in Wilderness

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http://www.accessfund.org/site/apps/nlnet/content2.aspx?c=tmL5KhNWLrH&b=7903133&ct=13134839&notoc=1

 

About time.

 

After decades of work, the Access Fund received notice yesterday from National Park Service (NPS) that the agency has issued final national policy authorizing fixed anchors in wilderness. This policy—Director's Order #41—affects many of the country's most important climbing areas such as Yosemite, Grand Teton, Zion, Joshua Tree, and Canyonlands National Parks. The NPS included many of the specific provisions Access Fund advocated for during our 20+ years of work on this issue, such as programmatic authorizations (which allow new bolts by zone, not just case-by-case permitting for individual routes/bolts) and interim fixed anchor permitting prior to the establishment of dedicated climbing management plans. We are still analyzing the new policy, but first impressions are that this direction is good for both wilderness climbers and NPS managers

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This is very exciting news!

 

Here's a shortcut to the good stuff. Go to 7.2 CLIMBING.

http://www.accessfund.org/atf/cf/%7B1f5726d5-6646-4050-aa6e-c275df6ca8e3%7D/DIRECTOR'S%20ORDER%2041%20SIGNED%205.13.13.PDF

 

A few take-home points:

 

"It is recognized that the use of removable anchor may reduce, but does not in

every case eliminate the need for fixed anchors."

"Fixed anchors or fixed equipment should be rare in wilderness. Authorization will be required for the placement of new fixed anchors or fixed equipment."

"'Clean climbing' techniques should be the norm in wilderness."

"The use of motorized equipment (e.g. power drills) is prohibited by the Wilderness Act and and NPS regulations."

 

So it's definitely not a sport climbing free-for-all, but I think minimal and last resort development of this kind is a good thing. But the Access Fund's claim that, "Fixed anchors...can be strategically placed to minimize climbing impacts to...wildlife in wilderness areas" still has me stumped. How does building an anchor with chocks impact wildlife? Impacts to soils and vegetation makes sense, but last I checked belaying off of a goat or pika was not a common practice.

But all in all, very exciting progress!

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Good news indeed! Fixed anchors,as we know, are a necessity for most climbs. I like the idea of keeping them to a minimum , but each climb can be judged accordingly. Just remember, no machines! Hand drill only and have fun!

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Fixed anchors,as we know, are a necessity for most climbs.

 

Umm, no. Not a necessity for MOST climbs.

 

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Good news indeed! Fixed anchors,as we know, are a necessity for most climbs. I like the idea of keeping them to a minimum , but each climb can be judged accordingly. Just remember, no machines! Hand drill only and have fun!

 

I dont think we need to worry about hand drills vs machines.....who the hell is going to carry a Bosch 20 pound drill into the wilderness......

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Good news indeed! Fixed anchors,as we know, are a necessity for most climbs. I like the idea of keeping them to a minimum , but each climb can be judged accordingly. Just remember, no machines! Hand drill only and have fun!

 

I dont think we need to worry about hand drills vs machines.....who the hell is going to carry a Bosch 20 pound drill into the wilderness......

 

:cough cough: infinite bliss :cough cough:

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Hardly in the wilderness.

Before this devolves, IB is in the wilderness - the USGS maps (at the time) showed an incorrect boundary. That was part of the controversy.

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Fixed anchors,as we know, are a necessity for most climbs.

 

Umm, no. Not a necessity for MOST climbs.

 

Unless the climb has a walk-off descent, fixed anchors are a necessary evil. And in my experience, more climbs require rappels than provide for walk-offs.

 

If and only if a route is very popular (like the West Ridge of Forbidden) do I advocate for bolted anchors to replace the ugly tat that litters every horn.

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Good news indeed! Fixed anchors,as we know, are a necessity for most climbs. I like the idea of keeping them to a minimum , but each climb can be judged accordingly. Just remember, no machines! Hand drill only and have fun!

 

I dont think we need to worry about hand drills vs machines.....who the hell is going to carry a Bosch 20 pound drill into the wilderness......

 

 

News_20120127Garibotti_interview_1.jpg

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Hardly in the wilderness.

Before this devolves, IB is in the wilderness - the USGS maps (at the time) showed an incorrect boundary. That was part of the controversy.

 

I hear you....but regardless of what the or any map says.....10 miles off I-90 and a 45 minute approach (only because it is steep) is not very wilderness to me.

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Fixed anchors,as we know, are a necessity for most climbs.

 

Umm, no. Not a necessity for MOST climbs.

 

Unless the climb has a walk-off descent, fixed anchors are a necessary evil. And in my experience, more climbs require rappels than provide for walk-offs.

 

If and only if a route is very popular (like the West Ridge of Forbidden) do I advocate for bolted anchors to replace the ugly tat that litters every horn.

 

 

tat can be removed, a hole in a rock is permanent.... just a thought :)

 

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tat can be removed, a hole in a rock is permanent.... just a thought :)

Not really but there is a good chance it'll outlast the person who drilled it.

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@ Kevbone - I agree.

 

@pink - rappel tat is left behind for a reason. On popular routes, more permanent anchors last longer, require less maintenance, and make more sense and leave less of a visual and environmental impact than much of the trash I see at Washington Pass and Boston Basin.

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