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christophbenells

4 season neo air vs. closed cell foam

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I trust my foam pad, it's kept me real warm up on many a mountain.

 

I want something I can put inside my bag though...

 

Any thoughts on the warmth difference between closed cell foam and. The neo air 4 season pad?

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there is a temp rating for sleeping pads I believe is called the R rating. I believe it is stated in the description for the products. I would say to compare that get a real comparison vs using someones opinion of the warmth differences.

from the cascade design website neo all season has a r rating of 4.9 and the ridgerest is a 3.5

not sure how what a rating of 1.4 difference between means as to how much warmer that is. But you could say that the neo is "warmer" than a ridgerest.

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I have a Big Agnes summer version of the neo-air.

In winter I take it and a thin/old ridgrest.

Comfort of the design is unparalleled compared to my ridgerest.

You cannot however pop/puncture the ridgerest nor will the valve leak.

If either of the above happens a wet T-shirt may work better than the neo-air.

 

I should add that my buddy uses the neo-air (insulated) loves it, after using the foam forever and swears it is equally as warm.

 

Edited by Tyson.g

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I want something I can put inside my bag though...

 

 

You put your sleeping pad inside your sleeping bag? Or you probably mean inside your pack?

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The pad I have does not let any cold through at all. Maybe it is something different maybe ensolite?

 

Much warmer than a ridge rest.

 

So 5 r value compared to totally blocking cold is the question.

Edited by christophbenells

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If you're thinking 4-season, take a look at the exped pads. They are pretty awesome and generally have higher R values per oz. That being said, I usually have a neoair light under me on something like Rainier in summer.

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If you're thinking 4-season, take a look at the exped pads. They are pretty awesome and generally have higher R values per oz. That being said, I usually have a neoair light under me on something like Rainier in summer.

 

I used an exped UL down pad this winter. I thought it was warmer than the neoair I used in the past.

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I picked up the Thermarest Neoair XTherm pad at the beginning of this winter and I absolutely love it. Best pad I have used. Definitely the warmest pad I have used. A little "slippery" but that I can deal with for what it offers in weight, warmth, and volume savings.

 

I got the small version, it weighs 11 oz, packs down to the size of a small soup can, and has an R-value of 5.7. Better warmth/weight ratio and smaller packed volume than the exped pads I believe....may be wrong though. Thing takes up no space in my pack, sweet for such a warm winter pad.

 

I have a whole bin at home of WAY to many different pads, both inflatable and closed cell foam. This is the last one I will ever buy for winter use (hopefully). Of course being inflatable the disadvantage is it can pop, but i also carry a repair kit and have never popped a pad yet with many many uses of them.

 

http://cascadedesigns.com/therm-a-rest/mattresses/fast-and-light/neoair-xtherm/product

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Ive owned and used a few of exped's and t-rest's latest pads and have reason to believe that the neoair xtherm may be the new gold standard in terms of warmth to weight. I've actually sold off my other pads because of the xtherm. Horses for courses. My 6 footer weighs sub 16oz, is super compact when deflated, is plenty warm in the winter, and is not susceptible to internal moisture. Beats the piss outta older style pads so long as the user is aware of potential for puncture and prepares accordingly.

 

Exped did recently come out with UL down mats and lite down mats that look very promising though. My exped mats were slightly more comfortable for my use due to their vertical baffles and raised outer baffles. In all honesty, both companies offer inflatable options that are plush and warm.

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The Neoair Xtherm is a kick ass pad for sure. Comparing the specs between the Xtherm and the Exped Downmat UL 7, for virtually the same exact length/width dimensions and R-Values, the Xtherm saves you over 7 oz on the regular 6 foot size, and 5 oz on a small tosro-length size. Another nice thing is you can just blow it up with your lungs and not worry about moisture vs. having to use a pump-bag to keep the internal down dry.

 

The exped pads do offer a bit more in comfort however, altough I still find the Xtherm mighty comfy. Both are awesome pads and you can't go wrong with either choice.

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