Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
grandpa

Shuksan Summit Pyramid "YDS rating"

Recommended Posts

Ok, for a (vague) reference point, what might the YDS rating on the summit pyramid of Shuksan be? And whether this would legitimately equate to anything I can do in the gym, I don't know, but I gotta start somewhere. Having never been up there. I have no idea, but it's "on my list" of things to do before I can't, so I ask...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The summit pyramid via the standard gully is fourth class and pretty straight forward. In terms of gym climbing ratings, it might be closer to a "5.easy". The gully itself is not difficult rather its avoiding the loose rock and dealing with the sense of exposure. Climbing this terrain in your boots will be the more difficult part. Have fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree w/MtnMatts assessment. Climbed the gully a year ago Sept, it was 4th with a couple 5.easy moves I'd say. I was wearing climbing boots at that time. It might be getting more interesting up there this time of year though, ya know?

 

Get a partner or two & go have a look. It's a fun day trip and a great workout.

 

d

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been up there in May and it was steep ice/snow. there were rocks visible but the ice would have made them pretty dodgy to climb.

 

Apart from the fact that we were in a snow storm it was actually a lot of fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The SE Ridge rates around 5.6, but is mostly low 5th class. It has the added benefits of being largely safe from rockfall and has much nicer views than the standard gully.

 

Many parties will go up the ridge (short pitches are better than long) and descend the gully.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The SE Ridge rates around 5.6, but is mostly low 5th class...

 

Ok, that's encouraging. I can muddle my way up a 5.10 (occasionally) in our gym, but what that means in the real world, I guess I'll not know until I give it a go.

 

I'm also wondering just how does one determine, or decide upon a particular rating? It doesn't seem like there are any measurements to compare to like in my world (electronics) where everything is measured with some degree of accuracy and precision.

 

Thanks for the replies, guys. If/when I accomplish this one, I'll yammer on about it here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll probably find 5.6 in boots to be a bit tricky, particularly if you haven't climbed outdoors before. Probably the most difficult part for you, will be the class 4 though. If you're used to climbing with a rope, going without, even on super easy rock, can be a bit unnerving.

 

The rating system is quite imprecise (for good reasons) and has been the subject of many great debates. If nothing else, it provides climbers with plenty of idle chit-chat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You'll probably find 5.6 in boots to be a bit tricky, particularly if you haven't climbed outdoors before. Probably the most difficult part for you, will be the class 4 though. If you're used to climbing with a rope, going without, even on super easy rock, can be a bit unnerving.

 

Well, it's been a while, like maybe 45 years or so, but I used to do a bit of scrambling on various surfaces - mostly where I should not have been - but point well taken.

 

The rating system is quite imprecise (for good reasons) and has been the subject of many great debates. If nothing else, it provides climbers with plenty of idle chit-chat.

 

Sounds like a good reason to bring a dab of good Scotch (some Balvenie, perhaps?) along, to assist in the "chit-chat" afterward... :)

 

Thanks, all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have the CAG with me, but I believe Beckey puts the SE ridge at class 3-4. There might be a way to keep it that low, but when I did it in August with a couple friends, we found some low 5th class moves. We simul-climbed most of it, with the leader wearing rock shoes and slinging some horns for pro, with a cam or two thrown in. I was comfortable following in boots rather than shoes. SE ridge is really the way to go.

 

Some people rap down the gully, but we down-climbed. The steeper, more exposed parts seemed solid, I didn't feel like there was any 5th class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe I found the magical route, but I climbed it back in July and just went up the most obvious center part of the gully. I found nothing above class 4 and mostly easy class 3. Loose rock was an issue for sure and I was happy to be the team there that morning. We did not use a rope at all and climbed in boots and I am not more than a decent rock climber. I could see a rope being nice for raps and climbing if uncomfortable, but we didnt need it.

 

Right now though, it might be interesting with all the snow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was my first climb in 1972 and I'd never rock climbed before. I think it must be fairly easy because I don't remember any issues at all--just scrambled up unroped in old high topped work/hiking boots. Seems like maybe class 3-4.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok, for a (vague) reference point, what might the YDS rating on the summit pyramid of Shuksan be? And whether this would legitimately equate to anything I can do in the gym, I don't know, but I gotta start somewhere. Having never been up there. I have no idea, but it's "on my list" of things to do before I can't, so I ask...

 

Before you climb Shuksan, go to a local crag somewhere. Maybe Exit 38, or Index, or Leavenworth, or...

 

Gym climbing is related to outdoor climbing, but there's a lot of difference. It's not hard to find holds, usually, but it's different, and they're more camouflaged than at the gym. That's the biggest thing, along with the fact that mountains don't smell like body odor. Also you don't wear a pack at the gym, might find yourself in boots or even crampons, etc. It's wise to get some practice much closer to the car before you summit the big peak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok, for a (vague) reference point, what might the YDS rating on the summit pyramid of Shuksan be? And whether this would legitimately equate to anything I can do in the gym, I don't know, but I gotta start somewhere. Having never been up there. I have no idea, but it's "on my list" of things to do before I can't, so I ask...

 

Before you climb Shuksan, go to a local crag somewhere. Maybe Exit 38, or Index, or Leavenworth, or...

 

Gym climbing is related to outdoor climbing, but there's a lot of difference. It's not hard to find holds, usually, but it's different, and they're more camouflaged than at the gym. That's the biggest thing, along with the fact that mountains don't smell like body odor. Also you don't wear a pack at the gym, might find yourself in boots or even crampons, etc. It's wise to get some practice much closer to the car before you summit the big peak.

 

Excellent suggestion(s). Shuksan is on my "to do someday" list, and for certain I'll not be going without someone who actually knows what they're doing. I have IMG in mind, they were excellent this past summer on Rainier.

 

And, I realize that paying a grand for a short trip is an expensive way to go about it, but I'm 1000 miles away, and don't know anyone out there (well no one that's interested in climbing anyway), well enough to go with a "local".

 

I'm already working on the climbing with a pack at the gym, also with hiking boots and 2lb weights around my ankles (been doing that occasionally for several months now).

 

And can you believe it, no red/blue/green/purple/yellow rocks out in the real climbing world? :lmao:

 

Exit 38, Index, etc all sound intriguing, I'll have to investigate next time we're out there. Exit 38 must be a few miles east of the highway 18 exit on 90?

 

Thanks to all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3rd class max.

 

In gym terms this would be that route with the holds shaped like dinosaurs that they put the little kids on when the gym hosts a birthday party.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Excellent suggestion(s). Shuksan is on my "to do someday" list, and for certain I'll not be going without someone who actually knows what they're doing. I have IMG in mind, they were excellent this past summer on Rainier.

 

And, I realize that paying a grand for a short trip is an expensive way to go about it, but I'm 1000 miles away, and don't know anyone out there (well no one that's interested in climbing anyway), well enough to go with a "local".

 

Nah, not really. There are people who pay a grand for a new big screen TV every couple years. You're getting something a hell of a lot better and more meaningful. And pretty rare.

 

I'm already working on the climbing with a pack at the gym, also with hiking boots and 2lb weights around my ankles (been doing that occasionally for several months now).

 

How does that go for you? Does anyone bat an eye? I've been thinking about bringing my pack to climb with at the local gym, but I've never seen anyone else do it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How does that go for you? Does anyone bat an eye? I've been thinking about bringing my pack to climb with at the local gym, but I've never seen anyone else do it...

 

I'll go along with the $$$ spent in the mountains being worth FAR more than a TV, etc. Besides, I've already spent a bunch getting ready to climb Rainier, so now I need to show my wife "what're you going to do with all that stuff now that you've done that?"

 

The pack/boots/weights bit in the gym doesn't raise an eyebrow (now), most everyone either knows what "that old guy" is doing, or doesn't notice. I also load it up and do "flights of stairs" on the stair climber. That helped a lot this summer also. 100+ flights of stairs with 30lbs on the back and 4-5lbs on each foot is a good workout.

 

You may want to ask first just to be considerate, but I'll bet the gym will not have a problem with you working out with a pack. I rarely see that here, but occasionally I see someone with a pack on doing laps on the track. Never anyone (but me) on the machines that I've noticed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you go with a guide service ask to finish via the SE ridge of the summit pyramid. Mid-fifth (fine in boots), but very, very esthetic and good climbing. Plus, you can scramble easily down the regular route on the descent. I don't know why the SE ridge isn't talked up more, one of my favorite easy romps in the Cascades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×