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TheNumberNine

Indoor training for Patagonia

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Hey people,

 

I've been getting in the gym whenever I can after work these days... I'm currently on a 75 hour per week schedule and can sometimes sneak out of work early to train.

 

I'm working on a campaign and after nov 6th I'll be free to train allll the time!

 

I'm getting ready for Patagonia and thus far I have been dry tooling in the back teaching room with taped up tools, mostly laps up and down a 20 foot wall and traversing around the room.

 

I have started climbing a bit indoors with my nepal evos and have been doing laps on the main walls with a 15 lb pack and my nepal evos on.

 

This is the best I can do for now but anyone have any input on how I can maximize my indoor training?

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look at what the mtn athelete, john frieh, and gym jones folks are doing. Seems like it would work overall endurance and bad ass-ery which patagonia demands.

 

BTW, I have never been there so I really don't know anything about it. :)

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.

 

This is the best I can do for now but anyone have any input on how I can maximize my indoor training?

 

Buy a chest freezer.

Sleep inside it

Practice tying knots in the dark inside it with gloves on

While soaking wet

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Maybe find a super windy day during the winter and climb something at Washington Pass or the Pickets in a day or two and you might be okay to climb in the Torres. Nothing indoors will prepare you for the hell you might endure. When I look at Colin's tick list of winter climbs, it becomes apparent why he's capable of climbing down there. A good example would be Inspiration Peak winter ascent.

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Most peoples first trip involves multi-pitch rock climbing.El Mocho, Luna etc.If you are there for a while, try something bigger, maybe Poincenot. I would train for rock , endurance and load carrying.

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We're looking to do the Whillans-Cochrane on Poincenot, Amy Couloir on Guillaumet, Luce de Leche on Cerro Nato, and some other climbs that are in the 60-70 deg ice/snow, 5+, and M3-M4 range. Luce de Leche is definitely going to be the "reach"...

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Practice spending days on end at camp waiting for good weather followed by a sprint to the summit when the weather turns.

Edited by matt_warfield

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If you don't know how to train for climbs like those, espescially while living in California, you probably shouldn't go.

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Well... I'm going to go... and I'm going to send those routes...

 

I hope you do. But prepare to fail. That will keep you alive.

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Ah young number nine, but you are forgetting the first rule of Patagonian climbing: Talk is cheap.

 

This isn't my rule of course, but one I picked up down there. The upside is that regardless of sendage, it is a great place to be.

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Choada, absolutely.

 

Jason, absolutely.

 

6 weeks until I hop on the plane... FEELING THE STOKE!!

 

Been trying to get outside as much as possible but it's been hard.. I'm working on a campaign and there's almost no free time. After Nov 6th I'll be heading to the Sierra to climb...

 

 

 

 

Edited by TheNumberNine

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Ah young number nine, but you are forgetting the first rule of Patagonian climbing: Talk is cheap.

 

the first rule of patagonia climbing is never talk about patagonia climbing.

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I was in El Chaltén last week and had one good day of weather out of 5. Fortunately there are tons of cliffs around town in case you decide it was a dumb idea to try to climb anything in the massif without proper training or enough time to wait out the bad weather. Looks like great sport climbing and possibly some long trad leads too.

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