Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
wayne

[TR] Turkey Monster - Dod Route 9/30/2012

Recommended Posts

Trip: Turkey Monster - Dod Route

 

Date: 9/30/2012

 

Trip Report:

There is a constant battle going on inside the mind of the climber on a scary lead. Ambition and stoke are at war with self preservation. Throw in added stresses like loose rock, exposure, and constant overhang, and you have the supreme conflict like we had on the Turkey Monster last weekend.

 

Hidden in the trees of the Menagerie Wilderness in Central Oregon, the Monster towers above the canopy with its bizarre sculpture. The 350' tall tower defies physics with a much larger girth in its midsection than its skinny base. At the top of the crumbling tube is a summit that reminds one of, of course, a turkey, but I see the devil himself.

 

Originally climbed in 1966 by legendary climbers Eugene Dod, Dave Jensen, and Bill Pratt, they aid climbed the steep cracks on the NE Face using 70 pitons and placing 30 now ancient or subsequently replaced bolts. Later free climbed at 5.11, many of the anchors were updated, yet the large loose blocks and the sketchiness remains.

A couple of years ago, I had the good fortune of making friends with Ben and Bekah Herndon, from Moscow, ID. An aspiring pro photographer, he asked me what climbs I thought would make a good photo shoot. I of course set his sights south to the Monsters lair. We planned it for last year, but weather didnt allow. We again planned it for sept of 2012 and tried to get a much help as we could. I brought along Christina, and Ben, his wife. Nobody else made it there, so we went for it with the team we had. Bekah did great, following my leads on the first day all the way to the top! I am grateful to not have pulled down any loose stuff on her at the belays. ” Sorry I killed your wife, bro” was not something I wanted to offer my good buddy. On the way down we fixed a static line and rapped to the beloved earth.

 

Early the next morning, I did the first 2 pitches again(!) for the close-ups pictures. They werent any less intense doing them for the 3rd time. What a run, and I hope Ben gets his great article in a coming magazine! Thank you B+B, and X-tina for a wonderful, and safe weekend.

 

More on my on-line climbing journal

 

tma.jpg

 

tmb.jpg

 

tmp7.jpg

 

tmd.jpg

 

 

ct2.jpg

 

ct31.jpg

 

ct14.jpg

 

ct41.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

tmr.jpg

 

Gear Notes:

Few med, large stoppers, and 1 set cams to 4"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the dod route's the regular route, right? that one pic looks like the pitch i recall as the "bongo drum" one, not so hard but jesus christ the whole thing sounds ready to peel off and head for the exits - the tent peg pro is nice too :)

turkey.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sad to say, I hear Nicholas A. Dodge passed away last month from a battle with cancer. His pioneering guidebooks set Oregon on the map for the climbing community starting in 1968 and updating it in '75. I worshiped that book as a lad. It had a big impact on my life. Still does, Thanks Nick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wise sir, do not grieve.

for every one of us, living in this world,

means waiting for our end.

let he who can achieve glory before death.

when a warrior is gone, that will be his best

and only bulwark.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sad to say, I hear Nicholas A. Dodge passed away last month from a battle with cancer. His pioneering guidebooks set Oregon on the map for the climbing community starting in 1968 and updating it in '75. I worshiped that book as a lad. It had a big impact on my life. Still does, Thanks Nick.

 

Ditto on what Wayne said. The picture on the book was classic. I remember thinking, "I HAVE to do that route, and being surprised to learn it was only 5.7...but a damned serious one at that if such can be said of a 5.7. Sorry to hear it was cancer. Soon, all too soon, we too must all follow Nick into the void..... at least he cut enough of a swath while he was with us here to be remembered. (pretty much what Ivan said there) RIP Nick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I worshiped that book as a lad.

Me too. He made all those junky Oregon climbs look awfully cool.

 

Something about the B/W photos with the little red hand-drawn flags on the summits!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn that it sad to hear about ole Nick Dodge. I have copies of both editions of his books. I never got the chance to meet him but I tip my helmet for the work he did to catalogue climbs in Oregon. Thanks Nick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Damn that it sad to hear about ole Nick Dodge. I have copies of both editions of his books. I never got the chance to meet him but I tip my helmet for the work he did to catalogue climbs in Oregon. Thanks Nick.

 

Ditto to that. He was a bad ass for sure. 5.7 in mountaineering boots. He will always be held in high regard in my house. He was one of the inspirations for my 100 Days 100 Miles 100 Climbs adventure. I also liked the little red flags on the summits in the book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sad news & a classic book...up there with Bjornstad's 1st ed. Desert Towers one imho. Always get that tingle of excitement & fear when I crack open the Dodge guide. Beautiful (pencil?) sketches too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dad knew Nick from way back. Very cultured man- fluent in Russian and could really play the piano. He had considerable responsiblities at the Corps of Engineers for many years, as well. Always fun to talk with him; last time I saw him was 2 summers ago at an Oregon State College Mountain Club reunion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't talk about the Menagerie without bringing up current public access issues.

There is currently a seasonal Falcon closure at the Menagerie. Unfortunately, I was unable to capture the photo below so have borrowed it as an example of how Falcons have begun to pop up more and more as they continue recovery after being delisted as Threatened and Endangered almost 15 years ago.

FALCON NESTED IN TREE

Peregrines are an important part of our climbing environment at the Menagerie. It is important we respect a "reasonable" seasonal closure of the "primary nesting management area" each season until "two weeks after the young have fledged."

 

Unfortunately, closures at the Menagerie are not reasonable and have become a national poster child for unreasonable Peregrine management. We are still encouraging interested climbers to take the time to read more on this issue and send a response to the Forest Service. WARNING: The information I've provided under the cascadeclimbers ACCESS FORUM is at least three beers worth. So assign a designated driver before leaving your tree.

Edited by g orton

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×