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christophbenells

confusion about "backclipping"

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well the title says it all...im new to the rock scene (done alot of volcano climbs) i dont really understand the concept...can anyone explain it in super layman terms?

 

 

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back-clipped (notice how the rope is "going into" the rock):

backclip1.jpg

 

correct (notice how the rope is "coming out of" the rock):

backclip2.jpg

Edited by rob

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I use the phrase "rock out" to remind myself when clipping.

I have to keep it very very simple as I am gettingold and feeble of mind. :)

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I'm also relatively new to the rock scene and have also had some confusion on this. It is obvious when sport climbing with short stiff draws, but when trad climbing with long alpine draws that are flopping around and even swinging in the wind, it appears almost impossible to determine when you are backclipped as the rope flopping around can change the orientation. My take on this has been that it is less important in this instance. See below. Is this back-clipped? Comments?

back-clipped.jpg

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Let me preface by saying I'm still pretty noobish too, but I think back-clipping and wrong-siding often get confused... back-clipping is where you run the rope the wrong way through the carabiner. Wrong-siding (yes, I made the term up) is just where you orient the carabiner gate on the "wrong" side, slightly increasing your odds of funky loading during a fall.

 

With alpine draws, it's easier to back-clip and not realize it, because there's a lot more flop in the draw, and under tension, the carabiner will just flip around to the right orientation, making it look like all is good. Then when you fall, the tension is relieved, and the carabiner flips back around and CLINK.... you're no longer clipped.

 

Just have to make sure that you run the rope OUT of the top side of the carabiner's most natural rest position, and you shnould be fine.

 

Actually... yes? I think the two on the bottom ARE back-clipped, pcg

 

-Ben

Edited by Ben B.

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pcg - you are correct that back-clipping is much less an issue when you're protecting with long, floppy runners. for placements where you have any doubt, though, consider using a lightweight locking carabiner on the rope end of the sling; or, I've seen some leaders use two carabiners, with gates reversed and opposed.

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Is this back-clipped? Comments?

back-clipped.jpg

 

Good question. At first glance, the angle of the photo combined with the tension on the rope pulling the slings outward made me think they are backclipped. But if I imagine looking at those slings from above when they hanging flat against the wall, the rope would be coming out from the rock. So, I'll say, no, they are not backclipped.

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When clipping the rope into the 'biner, the 'biner gate should face away from the direction you are climbing; otherwise it's backclipped and could pop the gate in a fall. On a vertical crack - alternate the gates.

 

Yes pcg, it's more critical on stiff sport draws than alpine draws.

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the spine of the biner and not the gate should always face the route but there are times when convenience reigns. Rock climbing involves risk.

 

I would advise never backclipping on a volcano.

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