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shaoleung

Ranger Dies during Rescue on Rainier

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http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Rescue-operation-underway-on-Mount-Rainier-159969055.html

 

these folks are usually the most on top of things (or seem to be) for the Seattle area for these types of events...like KGW.com is for Portland/Hood. Speaking of which, another Hood accident today:

 

http://www.kgw.com/news/Climber-injured-in-fall-on-Mt-Hood-159892705.html

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RIP climbing ranger hero

 

sounds like it's icy up on the Emmons

 

out of towners need a mandatory briefing, maybe a short video, this isn't like the Colorado 14ers.

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out of towners need a mandatory briefing, maybe a short video, this isn't like the Colorado 14ers.

 

x2, although I don't know what a reasonable solution would be. I know it was a rude awakening for me when I came to the Cascades - makes the Sierras look like McDonalds Playplace or whatever.

 

I know stories like these serve to remind me to be very aware of the safety of myself and my partners on the hill. Hopefully it does the same for others.

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All the Rangers I've met on Rainier are very fine people, skilled climbers, and public servants.

 

I'm gonna resist the temptation to comment, and just say this news makes me very sad indeed.

 

d

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So I'm not really the one to do the whole armchair quarterback thing, but the "facts" in this one really piss me off.

 

I wonder how hard the team even tried to perform their own crevasse extraction before calling 911? The article makes it sound like they basically just called and waited.

 

I really, really hope that's not the case.

 

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crap :(

Condolences to all those who new him and :brew: to the Rangers, Your work is always appreciated.

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My condolances to the friends, family and co-workers of the climbing ranger. This has been a very sad year for the staff at the Park and I hope they know how much we appreciate their willingness to put their lives on the line to protect/rescue the public in general and the climbers in particular. I haven't seen much in the way of "facts" on this accident but I would hope that we will reserve judgement on the four climbers that got in trouble. No matter what their decision making process I'm sure that they are grieving right now for the lost Ranger. Let's keep in mind that the press and public will be reading what you have to say on this topic.

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It has been an astonishingly bad year for the NPS staff at Rainier. Each gave their lives in the service of those who play on the mountain.

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Wow. What a terrible week in the PNW for climbing. My thoughts go out to the injured and the family and friends of those who have pasted. Let's analyze these accidents and learn from them. Especially the more inexperience climbers like myself.

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“Two members of the group slipped and fell into a crevasse on Emmons Glacier. They were all tied together.” Is “No pro, no rope” a good rule of thumb?

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“Two members of the group slipped and fell into a crevasse on Emmons Glacier. They were all tied together.” Is “No pro, no rope” a good rule of thumb?

 

As with almost every aspect of climbing that I can think of the answer is always "it depends".

 

Lets save the arm-chair quarterbacking for a different thread.

 

 

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“Two members of the group slipped and fell into a crevasse on Emmons Glacier. They were all tied together.” Is “No pro, no rope” a good rule of thumb?

 

This is like the all-time best question, of all-time.

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