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Sig Olsen

Trekking Poles...

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Does anyone like using them? May buy a cheap pair before I go to Mt. Shasta on the 26th. I find they wear me out more than help me, but this will be my first time hiking up in snow. May get these since they are so cheap. Under $25 per pair shipped. Found a link to make them light on backpackinglight.com build your own gear section.

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002QG1EMO/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?ie=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER

 

21TqijDUZaL._SS500_.jpg

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Trekking poles rock, walking up steep easy snow without them kinda sucks

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Only thing I'll say about getting cheap poles is consider durability. I once bought a pair of cheap poles and they broke on my third trip with them. The Black Diamond Flicklock Expedition poles I got after that are still going strong after many years. Sometimes you get what you pay for. If those poles are good quality, then you've got a bargain.

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I bought a pair of those exact poles to go up MSH last year. I lost the tip and snow basket under about 6" of snow on the first time out... just came right off in the snow half way up, making it useless for the rest of the trip.

 

Whatever you get, make sure it's not these.

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I was skeptical of trekking poles for years, then was faced with a long approach day for a carryover with a heavy pack so I borrowed my wifes and never looked back.

 

My own preference is for light and rigid. None of that spring loaded damping shit. BD is great and had some flick locks that are still going strong after several years. Also have a pair of REI ultralights (made by Leki I think)

 

Not sure why they would wear you out though. With a pack on, they are the bomb.

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I don't go up without poles. Sometimes I climb with guys who don't have poles, and I almost always end up loaning one of mine out.

 

I have a pair of Leki women's (lighter than men's) Ultralite Titaniums with powder baskets... I don't know what they weigh, but it's probably gonna be less than half a pound for both.

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If you're in Seattle, stop by Feathered Friends and play with their BD poles. OMG they're light! Kinda pricey, but if you're going to bother buying a pair, get a good set that you won't hum and haw about taking with you.

 

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I never leave home without them. For snow slogging you just get in a rhythm. Coming down steep slopes this old guys knees like em.

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some studies have indicated that using trekking poles reduces the load on knees by up to 30% - HUGE benefit over the long haul (say, decades), especially if you're humping heavy loads...

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