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The old and the young...


RuMR
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Not Spray: Rudy - cool vid!

 

Spray: Kevbone - fuck off and die.

 

Echo that sentiment...absolutely no spray involved...simple statement of what happened in a young guy's climbing ability development...

 

Kevbone, you are an absolute douchebag...don't post in this thread if it bothers you...move on...dick

 

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Not Spray: Rudy - cool vid!

 

Spray: Kevbone - fuck off and die.

 

Echo that sentiment...absolutely no spray involved...simple statement of what happened in a young guy's climbing ability development...

 

Kevbone, you are an absolute douchebag...don't post in this thread if it bothers you...move on...dick

 

Dude relax. You assume too much. You assume I think spray is bad. Totally the opposite. For me to write "awesome spray" is a total complement. Not a dis.......

 

spray is the reason this site rules. You may not agree, but that is also why this site rules.

 

The link to the older gentlemen is awesome. Along with your son. We may agree to disagree (along with whatever moderator deleted my post) but talking about yourself of other climbers and how amazing they are is spray....and stoke and its awesome. This is not a bad thing like you think it is.

 

Now moderators please remove all of Rudy's and all the other posters who swear and call me names. Hardly what is OK in this forum.

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Kevbone doesn't have the moral fiber and work ethics to even comprehend the degree of hard work and commitment it takes to achieve such level of body/mind control.

 

not that i'm necessarily defending kevbone here, but your post raises some interesting questions about "performance", and doing "well" in anything one might do...

 

firstly, it seems kevbone has a pretty high degree of proficiency with the guitar. i would think this would lead him to have some understanding of the processes involved in "mastery" (high skill level) of a particular medium of expression, right? i wouldn't dismiss him simply because he chimed in with a perhaps misunderstood comment. (btw, is it "spray" every time you play your guitar in front of somebody, kevbone?)

 

secondly, is "moral fiber" really a requirement for "sports performance" of any kind? seems like too many counter-examples everywhere to even go here. and "work ethic"? isn't this a rather puritanical approach to "climbing", simply reducing it to two such criteria seemingly devoid of the fun and passion that might be the ideal driving forces in any endeavor we partake in?

 

words words words.

 

 

 

 

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Kevbone doesn't have the moral fiber and work ethics to even comprehend the degree of hard work and commitment it takes to achieve such level of body/mind control.

 

not that i'm necessarily defending kevbone here, but your post raises some interesting questions about "performance", and doing "well" in anything one might do...

 

firstly, it seems kevbone has a pretty high degree of proficiency with the guitar. i would think this would lead him to have some understanding of the processes involved in "mastery" (high skill level) of a particular medium of expression, right? i wouldn't dismiss him simply because he chimed in with a perhaps misunderstood comment. (btw, is it "spray" every time you play your guitar in front of somebody, kevbone?)

 

secondly, is "moral fiber" really a requirement for "sports performance" of any kind? seems like too many counter-examples everywhere to even go here. and "work ethic"? isn't this a rather puritanical approach to "climbing", simply reducing it to two such criteria seemingly devoid of the fun and passion that might be the ideal driving forces in any endeavor we partake in?

 

words words words.

 

 

 

Well, climbing a run-out 5.11 slab after climbing a 14a section hardly compares to a "danger" of playing a guitar. I think playing guitar will never result in joint sparins and bone fractures, long falls can..... just saying...

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Kevbone doesn't have the moral fiber and work ethics to even comprehend the degree of hard work and commitment it takes to achieve such level of body/mind control.

 

not that i'm necessarily defending kevbone here, but your post raises some interesting questions about "performance", and doing "well" in anything one might do...

 

firstly, it seems kevbone has a pretty high degree of proficiency with the guitar. i would think this would lead him to have some understanding of the processes involved in "mastery" (high skill level) of a particular medium of expression, right? i wouldn't dismiss him simply because he chimed in with a perhaps misunderstood comment. (btw, is it "spray" every time you play your guitar in front of somebody, kevbone?)

 

secondly, is "moral fiber" really a requirement for "sports performance" of any kind? seems like too many counter-examples everywhere to even go here. and "work ethic"? isn't this a rather puritanical approach to "climbing", simply reducing it to two such criteria seemingly devoid of the fun and passion that might be the ideal driving forces in any endeavor we partake in?

 

words words words.

 

 

 

Well, climbing a run-out 5.11 slab after climbing a 14a section hardly compares to a "danger" of playing a guitar. I think playing guitar will never result in joint sparins and bone fractures, long falls can..... just saying...

 

Ummm... I don't think he got the point?

:noway:

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Well, climbing a run-out 5.11 slab after climbing a 14a section hardly compares to a "danger" of playing a guitar. I think playing guitar will never result in joint sparins and bone fractures, long falls can..... just saying...

 

now you're reducing the equation to the very subjective notion of "danger", which i think has little to do with "moral fiber" or "work ethic".

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back to the original post!

 

props to drew and the old dude(!), and bailey. really cool achievements!

 

 

what struck me the most with watching bailey climb scar face was how friggin much harder he'll be climbing soon. the sky is obviously not the limit for him at this stage. i think the same is happening to drew, as he gets stronger and stronger.

 

fun stuff.

 

 

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Well, climbing a run-out 5.11 slab after climbing a 14a section hardly compares to a "danger" of playing a guitar. I think playing guitar will never result in joint sparins and bone fractures, long falls can..... just saying...

 

now you're reducing the equation to the very subjective notion of "danger", which i think has little to do with "moral fiber" or "work ethic".

Not everyone can climb 11 runout after climbing 14a, it takes enormous amount of training both physical and mental to get to that point. These guys do it, not because they are talented, but because they are committed. Vast majority of people on bb have no frigging clue to what it takes to get to that point. So props to these young guys! Of course the result are a related directly to "moral fiber" and "work ethics". And comparing playing a guitar to climbing hard just showed you are missing the point. Danger is not subjective- how many 40 ft falls have you taken?

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Not everyone can climb 11 runout after climbing 14a, it takes enormous amount of training both physical and mental to get to that point.

 

ok just for fun, let's continue this insightful conversation.

 

so you are saying above that a 5.14 climber would have to undergo an "enormous amount of training both physical and mental" to climb a runout 5.11 slab? quite frankly, that's ridiculous and you know it. it's preposterous even. ludicrous. silly. tortured.

 

These guys do it, not because they are talented, but because they are committed.

 

i'd humbly suggest that they are quite "talented", if that word is to mean anything anymore. their talents came about through much climbing, and from an advantageous genetic predisposition, and in rudy's case at least, parents who support and share in his exploits.

 

 

So props to these young guys! Of course the result are a related directly to "moral fiber" and "work ethics".

 

how are the results related to "moral fiber"? please explain.

 

also, defining "work ethic" as "a set of values based on hard work and diligence", i do wonder if this is the relationship these kids have to climbing, or one that you are projecting onto them. my suspicion, at least with the case of bailey, is that there isn't really an "ethic" at play here, more just a non-ending psych to climb, and this i personally wouldn't call "work"!

 

And comparing playing a guitar to climbing hard just showed you are missing the point. Danger is not subjective- how many 40 ft falls have you taken?

 

what is the "point" you speak of?

 

and yes, "danger" is very subjective. everyone defines it differently, and everyone responds to situations differently. shoot, my parents think leaving the house is dangerous!

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actually Kimmo, with regards to Bailey, he really really worked for this climb.

 

To be frank, he had the physical tools to climb this route over a year ago. His brain was the problem. He freaked out at smith and outdoors.

 

We spent a lot of time (well, i spent a lot of time hiking and belaying him, he spent a lot of time climbing) seeking out more runout "old school" climbs where he was operating in an uncomfortable space (for him) to get his grey matter ready. He invested a lot of time being uncomfortable. I had to practically browbeat him into this approach.

 

He had tried this route earlier and was shutdown. There was no way he was going to link it. He was quite upset with himself, so we developed this approach that incorporated the whole "large base" approach, but with the caveat that they had to be stiff old school routes, not just clip ups...and absolutely no taking was allowed. He had to go for it and the consequences were what they were...no grabbing draws and no takes...

 

In that regard, i believe Bob is right that he didn't just take the approach of "wiring that down to a 5.11", the cheezy approach so to speak. His actual try count is well below ten tries, albeit it was spread out over a season. He is a better climber for it because of this approach and is now more comfortable at his limit. You are right, scarface is nowhere near his limit.

 

Unfortunately, there was no way Chris' little flick can capture the work that went into that redpoint. But Sean knows it internally. Was it fun for him? I don't know...maybe its type 2 fun...it certainly is rewarding though.

 

For what its worth this is the approach that i've taken with Drew.

Edited by RuMR
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