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mplutodh1

Go-To Alpine/Glacier Boots

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I've been using Scarpa Inverno boots (with the high altitude liner) for a little while now and while it does keep my feet plenty warm and worked fine even on the bigger trips (Baker, Rainier, etc.) I find them to be a bit more clunky/heavy then I would prefer when dealing with a non-snowy approach. Hoping to find a leather / lighter weight boot as my go-to.

 

I have been considering the La Sportiva Nepal EVOs for a while now due to them being the standard really. They are a bit spendy but, your feet are one of the most important areas to not skimp on IMO!

 

I'm also considering the Scarpa Mt. Blancs depending on how the La Sportiva's fit.

 

My question to those with the Nepal EVOs or experience with these types of boots around here - do you find them to be flexible enough to do most of your climbing activities in the WA/OR area? Volcano / North Cascades / Ice Climbing / etc.

 

I'd keep my Invernos in case I need the super warmth.

 

I do have feet that run a little cold (at least one foot as I broke my ankle years ago and it has had poor circulation since). I've never had issues with cold feet in the Invernos though.

 

Thoughts or recommendations?

 

With the REI 20% off right now - the Evo's be 408+ tax and with the return policy - if they don't fit after an outing I'm not completely screwed.

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I like my Nepals. They've been fine for me over the past few seasons. As they're the only pair of mtn boots I own, the have done standard volcano slog routes as well as technical rock and ice climbing and they've never really left me wanting much more. Flexible enough but stiff enough, light enough but warm enough, a great jack of all trades boot for the Cascades. Can't really go wrong with them

 

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Nepals are definately a great boot if they fit your foot. I also climb everything from volcanos to ice/mixed with them. I finally just upgarded from the older one to the newer evo this season new ones are nice. I did try the Scarpa MB also very nice close fit and similar boot just went with the nepal since I've had another pair. Extra ankle support is nice to have on long ice routes also. Either boot will will get the job done just come down to fit.

Edited by Skatan

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Not that I need the temptation, but whats been your take on the new vs old Nepals? how much lighter? I've had the old generation for pushing 15 years now and no issues. A ton of life left, so no Need to upgrade... But the new ones sure look nice.

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According to a postage scale 6oz lighter than older models per boot sz44 not sure how accurate scale is. Lighter none the less. Lower profile so toe box is different. Feet are closer to crampon so climb better I think. Warmer and the goretex is a nice feature. Older version are still an awesome boot not much they could improve on the Nepals! This is why after trying on quite a few boots I stuck with these.

Out with the old in with the new

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Well I called in a favor and had the parents use their 20% off at the REI sale. I picked up the Nepal EVOs and they picked up the Mont Blanc's. Wore both around the house for a few days and found the Mont Blanc to be a bit tight fitting across my instep and started to get uncomfortable as time went on. Tried different lacing options but no improvement without causing slippage.

 

For only $80 more after the discounts, opted to go with the Evos. Wore them for my recent crevasse rescue course and enjoyed them a lot. Not nearly as warm as my double boots but lighter, and a bit more comfortable for a full day. Looking forward to them!

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Call me stupid if you will but if im not a non snow mid to late summer route, I just head 'er on up in my tennys (trail running shoes)

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LOL sorry *if im on a non snow route*

 

Non-snow route vs. non-snow approach are very different. Agreed, I wear some trail running shoes for most of my standard hikes. However, for alpine routes, mixed, glaciated, etc. I won't be wearing tennis shoes nor am I a fan of carrying a pair of boots on my back unless I really have to.

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For medium duty I used to rely on the Trango-S. But recently I bought a pair of Scarpa Charmoz. Same type construction but actually lighter than the segment leading Trango-S. These boots are amazing, super sticky rubber, I've climbed up to 10c edging in them.

 

For the big cold stuff some old Koflach Degre with Intuition liners. The liners make them substantially lighter.

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I absolutely love my Scarpa Phantom Guides. Feel like regular hiking boots. But they are my first pair. I am very hard to please when it comes to footwear also.

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I prefer a lighter boot than the Sportiva Nepal (although if the Nepal fits you well, it could be the last pair of boots you ever need to buy), but I still want a rigid-sole boot that accepts clip-on crampons, which leaves out the Trango-S. I currently use Trango Primes, which not only handle rock climbing to 5.10 better than I do any more, but are exceptionally "walkable" for a rigid-sole boot. Over the years, I've been happy with Lowa and Garmont as well. I have partners who swear by Scarpa, but my low-volume feet have swum in every model Scarpa I've ever tried on. My eldest son loves Kayland. Fit is key. Shop around and hold out for the boot that feels like you were born in it - then have a custom insole fitted. Superfeet Corks may seem expensive at first blush, but my first pair lasted me 20+ years, outlasting three pair of top-flight alpine boots.

 

Like Mr. Olsen, I'm pretty picky about my alpine boots... one of my biggest pet peeves is each time I've found the perfect boot, it has lasted just long enough that it's no longer made when I need to replace it!

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