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BootsandPants

Recommendations for a camera for climbing

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Is there anything wrong with buying a used camera? Or do you need to be pretty camera savvy to make sure if not messed up. Wanna break into the dslr style but I'm on a budget.

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May not be what you are looking for as it does not have all of the typical DSLR 'options' - but I've been happy with my Olympus – Stylus Tough 6020. It's pretty sturdy, I don't stress over it being in my pack or jacket pocket that gets bumped, etc.

 

 

Slowest......Camera........Ever.

 

But I've seen one dropped a long ways and be just fine. So it really depends on what you need.

 

 

Yeah - but if it works for what you're looking for... and holds up, does the job. I'm by no means a camera snob and really don't care much about speed, etc - just take a decent photo, don't break the bank and hold up to a little abuse and it'll work fine. I didn't want a camera I had to worry about if it got wet, got bumped or dropped, got too cold, etc.

 

Works for my needs, might not for others.

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Is there anything wrong with buying a used camera? Or do you need to be pretty camera savvy to make sure if not messed up. Wanna break into the dslr style but I'm on a budget.

 

I'd probably do it if it was from a reputable shop who'd take it back with no questions. (And not Craigslist.)

 

I've bought refurbished cameras a couple time through Adorama & B&H - nothing wrong with that, factory re-certified, etc. And at a decent discount.

 

Adorama refurbs

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Is there anything wrong with buying a used camera? Or do you need to be pretty camera savvy to make sure if not messed up. Wanna break into the dslr style but I'm on a budget.
I second the refurbished. I always avoid buying used electronics. Have you checked some of the discount sites online? Plenty of deals out there.

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May not be what you are looking for as it does not have all of the typical DSLR 'options' - but I've been happy with my Olympus – Stylus Tough 6020. It's pretty sturdy, I don't stress over it being in my pack or jacket pocket that gets bumped, etc.

 

 

Slowest......Camera........Ever.

 

But I've seen one dropped a long ways and be just fine. So it really depends on what you need.

So here's what I call a long drop!

I dropped a guys brand new $450 Nikon off the top of "Rod of God" at Vantage, plus scratched the b'jesus out of my wife's nice p&s.

:cry:

ALWAYS use the STRAP! ALWAYS!!

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So, can we get a final synopsis of the best camera opinions? (Or, do I have to re-read the whole thread?)

 

What camera(S) got the most recommends? Survey?

 

My Panasonic Lumix is on it's last leg. I really like a lot of the features but it lacks durability and RAW. I may get another one like it unless I can be convinced otherwise.

Pano_9_24_11JPG.JPG

 

Ruth_Glacier_Moon_3_1_.jpg

 

Chugach1.jpg

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So, can we get a final synopsis of the best camera opinions? (Or, do I have to re-read the whole thread?)

 

What camera(S) got the most recommends? Survey?

 

Here's my brief overview of what people have said:

 

Canon S100 - Small, light, IQ is pretty good, does RAW, little pricey but that's what happens when you put stupid things like GPS on a camera

 

Panasonic LX5 - little bigger than the canon but great IQ, does RAW. A little "outdated", but LX6 should be coming out soon

 

Nikon AW100

 

Sony NEX5 - m4/3rds CCS that a few seem to like. Too bulky for my goals though

 

Olympus E-5 - another m4/3 ccs with high praise.

 

 

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Well it should really be divided into 2 or 3 categories.

 

1) Snap shot rock climbing shots for a screen saver

- Want small and non cumbersome(Paramount)

2) Snap Shot snow ice backpacking/camp shots

- Slightly better quality may be blown up large

3) Landscape camera.

- Quality of optics is overwhelming need

- Forces one to large glass lenses.

- Body/Sensor doesn't really matter except MPix count

 

Throw in

1) $$$

2) How avid of a photographer are you?

- Are you into screen saver Roger Wilco Shots?

- Or do you print them VERY LARGE as wall hangings...

 

Personally for me? I would rather have top quality pictures and climb slower attaining fewer summits giving me lasting memories to hang on my wall and also as conversation starters when people come over. This DOES NOT MEAN that I buy the newest, latest and greatest camera body. In fact, I generally use OLD equipment. Its half the cost and 85%-99.999% of what a newer camera is capable of. I rarely use a camera at anything other than Base iso when in the mountains. This includes sunrise/sunset shots. I don't see any need to upgrade from a camera that is 5 years old. The new 36Mpix Nikon that just came out might sway me as it has 3X the theoretical resolution of my old camera Meaning I could theoretically blow the picture up far larger assuming I could actually afford to buy the printer/costs that is...

 

PS. Rock climbing with a large camera is next to impossible except for the rear guy and then you get nothing but butt shots...

 

PPS. Stitching pictures is near seemless today without any work at all. With a little work it IS seemless, so why on earth do we really need trillion pixel cameras? EDIT: Detail of macro shots for starters. Purist landscape photographers who can't stand the thought of stitching and a slight blur. In some instances they are 100% correct, usually its undetectable with a little forethought when you take said pictures in question.

 

Give me quality glass everytime, sensor doesn't matter for 99.999% of mountain shots. Indoor photography, people photography on the street one needs the newer sensors on a real camera. The tiny sensor cameras are still garbage.

Edited by Wastral

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PS. I honestly don't think one can go wrong with any camera produced in the last 5 years. Well that is a big stretch as all the phone cameras are garbage.

 

PPS. A "TOUGH" "RUGGED" camera might be quite a few folks ticket. Don't know how much water sports, beach combing, kayaking, river pictures one takes, but they are rather nice even rock climbing because they have recessed lenses generally meaning its near impossible to scratch the glass compared to a standard compact camera. Know a guy who has trashed 2 "normal" compacts this way and his "tough" camera is still going strong several years after the fact.

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Guess I should add that I tote around and APS-C sized sensor camera. At the time I bought it, all compacts were pretty much junk as none had good lenses on them for sharpness. That is not completely true anymore. Just mostly all true.

 

Me and my friend tote around a Cannon s95 when rock climbing. Also the Sony W10 I believe provides good snap shots.

 

If one wants to color correct compact cameras one can stitch and get good pictures, but it requires a lot of extra work if you are a perfectionist like me.

 

All the new super thin/small large sensor cameras are really tugging on my purse strings though I have not jumped yet. With a pancake lens they do nearly everything you wish and are just as small as a compact camera, but without the zoom range, but also provide far better pictures as well in terms of clarity, dynamic range, color profiles.

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If I had to buy another small camera I would get one that could do RAW. All my JPEG point and shoots have been a disappointment compared to my DSLR cameras.

 

Currently I am carrying my Canon 7D everywhere. I lead with it, but it cuts me down from 10a to 5.9, which is an ok sacrifice considering the fun I have when a photo (or video) opportunity appears. Nothing like seeing an awesome climber below you in great light, and knowing you can capture it, no problem, because you have a real camera.

 

This is Craig Sunday at Index:

 

IMG_0788.jpg

 

And here is Craig leading Libra onsight, 10 minutes later. Vladimir is belaying:

 

Craig leading Libra on Vimeo

 

It was bad light (evening), but my 7D was able to capture it reasonably well. This is right out of the camera, no post edit, other than the compression Vimeo did on my compressed 280meg mp4. I'm brand new to video, but it's a lot of fun.

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the still photo was shot with a $130, 50 mm, 1.8 prime lens:

http://www.amazon.com/Canon-50mm-1-8-Camera-Lens/dp/B00007E7JU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1335312267&sr=8-1

 

It's an amazing lens, super cheap, all plastic housing, but awesome glass and very fast.

 

The video was shot with my Sigma 10-20 wide zoom. It's the older 10-20, not the new one with the fast constant aperture:

http://www.amazon.com/Sigma-10-20mm-4-5-6-Digital-Cameras/dp/B0007U00X0/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1335312346&sr=1-2

 

I'm saving up to replace my Sigma 18-250 zoom, which broke. I'm leaning towards the Canon 24-105...maybe even the "L" glass model. I'm tired of $500 lenses that break in a few years.

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Thanks for the info!

 

I hear you on the lens front, it seems like for the zooms you have to get above 1K before you get quality and durability. I know John Scurlock is very happy with his f/4 24-105. Seems like a great lens.

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I'm leaning toward the Lumix LX5 now that I lost my other Lumix at the Black Keys show last week. :( It was all taped together and on it's last leg but I sure want the memory card back as it was an amazing show with excellent seats :rawk::rocken: ...

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I'm leaning toward the Lumix LX5 now that I lost my other Lumix at the Black Keys show last week. :( It was all taped together and on it's last leg but I sure want the memory card back as it was an amazing show with excellent seats :rawk::rocken: ...
I just pulled the trigger on the Lumix. Can't wait till it gets here...

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I have a Lumix and have been really happy with it.

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If you want a good point-and-shoot, I’d get:

Canon S105

Or

Canon G1x: note, this has a near-DSLR-sized image sensor and image quality, but it’s quite bulky for a point-and-shoot

 

If you want a “tough” point-and-shoot, I’d get this:

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/05/08/Olympus-Tough-TG1-iHS-rugged-waterproof-shockproof-12MP-compact-camera

Why? Much better and faster lens than your average “tough” point-and-shoot (which have horrid optics). Just note that you are definitely sacrificing image quality on the altar of toughness. (read: a non-rugged point-and-shoot in the same price range, like the ones listed above, will give you much better image quality)

 

If you want something in-between a point-and-shoot and a DSLR, I really like this:

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/04/30/Olympus-OM-D-E-M5-review

 

Why?

Awesome build quality: it’s weather-sealed (not that same thing as waterproof, but good enough to protect against splashes/snow/drizzle), you can set it in the snow and not have to worry

Awesome image stabilization: works with any lens as it’s built into the camera body

Great lens selection: I’d highly recommend getting some fast primes for it, like the Panasonic 20mm f/1.7.

Built-in viewfinder: this is a must for me, I hate composing using the screen on the back of the camera, a lot of people could care less about this though.

Size: it’s small, much smaller than you probably think.

 

The Sony NEX series are also good (particularly the NEX-7) but the lenses are quite large and they need a more diverse lens selection (not enough fast primes, which are what I like to shoot with) I'm also not a fan of the interface and the lack of external buttons (the NEX-7 is an exception to this)

 

I personally shoot with a bigazz DSLR but I don’t care about the extra clunk/weight, it’s worth it to me and I’m used to sherpa'ing it around by now :)

Edited by Xerinae

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I'm leaning toward the Lumix LX5 now that I lost my other Lumix at the Black Keys show last week. :( It was all taped together and on it's last leg but I sure want the memory card back as it was an amazing show with excellent seats :rawk::rocken: ...
I just pulled the trigger on the Lumix. Can't wait till it gets here...
Wow, muy pronto on the delivery. I ordered a refurbished Lumix LX5 on the 14th and it arrived, along with the extra battery & auto lens cap, on the 17th. Hoping the case arrives today.

 

This is my first P & S camera that does raw and I'm excited to play with it once the software finishes downloading. At least I am familiar with the Lumix set-up so I don't have to re-learn a new system...

 

So far, I love it! The lens quality is great for a P & S digital. I'll post up some pics from the test drive.

 

Next question for those that own the same Lumix LX5 is... Do you have any "custom settings" for shooting in common climbing scenarios (IE - snow/bright light, rock, sunset/landscape, etc)?

 

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To me this looks like it could be the cream of the current crop of 'tough' cameras, but we'll have to wait to see some real-world results.

 

I used 5 of the Pentax "W" series cameras (starting with the 33WR) over the last decade. One quit working; the other 4 were lost in various 'mishaps'. I noticed that as each newer model crammed more pixels onto the sensor, IQ suffered - the usual story with P&S cameras.

 

I really like the new Nikon P&S, as far as getting bang-for-the-buck image quality. But the funky touchscreen is just not usable in the mountains, especially with gloves on. The Panasonic Lumix TS3 & TS4 are fast to power-up and have great IQ, but the waterproof case seems to be unreliable. Might not be a deal-killer in the mountains, but I'd like to take the thing kayaking or snorkeling too. I still like the design of the new Pentax WG, but they really lag behind on IQ. Haven't really seen the Canon D20 yet.

 

For now, I just carry a lightweight DSLR setup (or a cheapo compact P&S) in a bag on my pack strap, and try to keep the thing as dry as possible.

 

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I'm still figuring out how to edit RAW, but here are a few pics(not yet edited) while playing around with the Panasonic Lumic LX5...

 

I smell BACON! YUM, BACON!

P1000105.JPG

 

Cosmo!

P1000108.JPG

 

P1000114.JPG

 

P1000132.JPG

 

P1000148.JPG

Chicken Fried Rice, my best yet. YUM!

P1000175.JPG

 

 

P1000150.JPG

 

P10001511.JPG

 

BTW, those rocks are balancing like 5.11+, they take grounders daily.

 

P1000153.JPG

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That is some good looking chicken fried rice! Are those red onions I see?

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I have the lumix ts3. The case is waterproof. I tested it. You do have to be careful when you shut it. The gaskets must be perfectly clean. They ship it with a brush to clean the gasket.

 

But the image quality suffers in any kind of challenging light: burned out highlights, plugged shadows. Even in perfect lighting conditions, when you zoom in to 100 percent in Photoshop, the pixels are badly compressed with a lot of artifacting.

 

So, if you can, get a P&S that shoots raw. That way *you* get to choose the jpg compression settings, afterward, in your image editor (Photoshop, etc). Small sensors suffer already, and if all they deliver is a jpg...well, it's like having a camera that only gives you prints, like a Polaroid: no negative. RAW is your negative.

 

I'm glad I have the TS3 for sea kayaking, but if I had it to do over, I'd buy a Canon that could shoot raw.

 

Meanwhile, my DSLR Canon 7D is my everyday shooter. I'll be packing it around Index Sunday. A great combination of DSLR and light plastic lens is the $130 Canon 50mm 1.8 prime.

 

 

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