Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
AllYouCanEat

Crevasse rescue on Baker...

Recommended Posts

When will the news media get it right????

The other “Hiker” on the scene first was John Colver of American Alpine Institute, a fellow guide and good friend of mine. What the news media fails to indicate that if he was not there more than one would likely be dead or in a lot worse shape.

Anyway, I left a message with John and as soon as I talk to him, I will provide more detail.

Good Job to John and all the other AAI and Rescue Staff involved.

Tommy

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got of the phone with John Colver (the guide from American Alpine Institute who was first on the scene of the accident).

We had a brief discussion about the incident and here is what he told me.

At about 8600’ just below the saddle (at 9000’) on the Coleman Glacier, there was an icy section on the route. One of the climbers slipped and fell into a crevasse. The rest of the party was unable and/or failed to arrest the fall, and as a result all 4 were drug into the crevasse.

John and his two clients arrived on the scene approximately 30 minutes after the fall. The deceased victim was still alive when John got to him. John began rescue breathing for him but to no avail. The victim suffered massive head injuries, and died shortly thereafter.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The worst thing about dying in the mountains is having people say stupid things about you after you are dead.

looks like Mom also knows nothing about mountaineering:

Hiker who died on mountain was ill-prepared: mother

KAMLOOPS (CHNL) — The mother of the 43-year-old man who died on Mount Baker on Sunday says her son was ill-prepared to be hiking on a glacier.

Mount Baker hikers' names released

Evelyn Ewan of Kamloops says her son Glynn had no previous experience climbing glaciers and shouldn't have been taken onto such a dangerous glacier.

"If he had known better operating procedures, if he had been a hiker, when the head man slipped, Glynn would have known to either disconnect the rope or not try and hold on and hold him, which he did. And then of course when he couldn't hold him and it gave way, it just propelled him right into the sharp ice and smashed his chest."

Ewan, who fell to his death while climbing Mount Baker with three other people, grew up in Kamloops and attended the 25-year reunion of his high school last month.

Evelyn Ewan says he hopes her son's body can be recovered soon from Mount Baker. Inclement weather has hindered recovery efforts on the mountain.

She said her son's employer has offered funding to help recover his body from the 2,580-metre level.

"My son's company, Francis Foods, [is] going to pay for a private recovery," she said. "That way it would give them some personnel to try to do it again today. We don't know if by the time we get all the wheels in motion they can still get it done today. But, if not today, it will be first thing tomorrow morning."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moral of the story, if you are in conditions where you cant self arrest you should probably either unrope or place pro.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So true Dru...

And sometimes, believe it or not, it's OK to back off from a climb in the face of icy conditions. Just because you're wearing crampons doesn't mean you're secure on ice, and high up on Baker isn't really where anyone should be taking their first steps. There's no shame in waiting until next year, to return & do the route in more pleasant and safer early-season conditions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did the accident occur on the Coleman - Demming route? An earlier news report indicated that the accident happened as members of the party were ascending an ice cliff. For that matter, how is the Coleman - Demming route at this time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read that they were just below the 9000' saddle, which sounds a lot like the C-D route. The "ice cliff" they mentioned is probably one of the steeper sections there below the saddle. I was there 2 weeks ago & didn't see any major ice in this area; it sounds like it's melted off & iced up a lot since then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rope Disconnectors are cheap! I got mine for less than 3 dollars and very multi use tools. Eating opening cans etc wink.gif

Sorry about those dudes up there.........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because he suffered "massive head injuries" chances are good that he wasn't wearing a helmet. Doubtful if I would have been wearing a helmet on that route either.

Should a "hiker" be climbing the C-D route at this time of year? (or any time?) How did he end up on the mountain with no experience?

Be careful who you climb with, know your limits, and don't think that turning back short of the summit makes you any less of a person. It may keep you alive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Armchair quarterbacking never goes anywhere. A few climbing friends have died because of just plain old mountain stuff. And then everyone gathers around to spew their high and mighty hindsight only to watch those same loud mouths make even worse mistakes. Climbing is dangerous. No excuses, No warnings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by Ropegun2001:

Armchair quarterbacking never goes anywhere. A few climbing friends have died because of just plain old mountain stuff. And then everyone gathers around to spew their high and mighty hindsight only to watch those same loud mouths make even worse mistakes. Climbing is dangerous. No excuses, No warnings.

 

So true

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's true. In a situation like this, where there has been inaccurate media coverage, it's good if the facts can come out and we can look at these facts and learn something. That's what accident reviews are for. Unfortuneately the parties mistakes are often exposed in the process. It's never a comfortable position to be in when a mass audience sees where you may have screwed up. Sometimes the audience does feel the need to spew their wisdom forth and let everyone know how great they are based on how stupid you were.

A forum such as this one loses it's effectiveness when this occurs.

RGY2K+1 was right. Climbing is dangerous. Mistakes and accidents do happen. Learning from them is good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×