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Gregory.S.

What size is YOUR 1-3 night bag?

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Right now I have a mountain hardwear direttissima 46 (large size is 50ish liters). I am thinking about buying the Marmot Centaur 38 Pack (link below) but am not sure if it would be too small. I would use it for Adams, Hood, Baker, Shuksan, etc. What does everybody else use for mountains like these? Also, the Large I would be getting is 41 liters. 1-3 nights on average.

 

 

http://www.rei.com/product/833155/marmot-centaur-38-pack-2011-closeout,-dark-coal/black,-large?preferredSku=8331550002?cm_mmc&mr:trackingCode=AE12AAF4-D12C-E111-B2D2-001B21631C34&mr:referralID=NA

 

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I use a Cilogear 45 and its more than big enough. I'll usually take out the aluminum suspension, as it carries good enough on its own. It's expandable enough and can compress down easily for when you're actually doing some climbing with it on.

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I got a old wild things andinista that worked good for even 4 nights out with a shared light tent. After 1 night, the additional weight for more nights is not that great. I think I used it at the 4000 cubic inch volume. not much technical climbing gear though, just glacier travel crap. If you where going to add technical gear, I suspect you would need to forgo some comfort items like a normal tent and use sil tarps.

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BD Mission 75 OR my CiloGear Worksack 40B (which stretches to 65L if I want).

 

I like BIG and LIGHT for overnights. Big to stuff a lot in and light because I don't want it to add too much weight to all the overnight gear.

 

P.S. Both these packs are in the 3lb 12 oz range unstripped.

Edited by CaleHoopes

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Cilogear 30L or 45L.

 

The marmot and the mountain hardwear packs you listed seem pretty good, decent weight, not too many gimmick features, but your just not going to get the versatility with those packs as you are with the Cilo Worksack (like stripping the pack down to a 1.6 lb. summit pack and customizing the compression strapping to accommodate any type of item or configuration you desire).

Edited by Sol

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A 40L size is a good sort of do-it-all pack imo. Enough room for technical gear and overnight gear, but not too much room to tempt you to bring unnecessary items. The Marmot looks good and would work fine as long as you were diligent in your packing. Sweet price too. I've gotten by with a 35L with technical rock gear for two nights out in the past and was never in want of anything, except maybe a beer, so you should be alright.

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Unfortunately pack volumes are not necessarily equal across manufacturers. I find my BD Shadow 45L to be perfect for 1 -3 nights on technical roues. I also hace a Montbel Balance Light 40 which is identical in volume, and also perfect for 1 -3 nights on technical ground.

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Just curious what it is you guys are climbing that a 40L pack is sufficient for 1 - 3 days?

 

My 26L Warthog is stuffed to the gills for a one day alpine route, and that includes the rope under the lid and helmet on top. It mostly empties once climbing, but still...

 

Heck, going for one day into the Headwall or Storm Creek (ski approach) and I can just fit everything into a 52L!

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I love my Osprey "Varient" 52L. It's tight, but I can get three days gear, rack, rope in mine. Being the gear whore that I am, you might be able to get by with the Variant 37 but I tend to bring everything including the kitchen sink.

 

One poster here put it well stating "the Variant borders on perfection". Sure is squeaky though.

 

Osprey Varient

 

"The three-point haul system of the Osprey Variant 52 Backcpack makes lugging your stuff up a wall easy. The big volume and convenient pocketry of this Osprey winter make your gear easy to access, and the removable hipbelt and framesheet shed weight when you need to go light. Stash your crampons, ice tools, and wand or probe in their own locales for quick gettin’ and puttin’ away. A water-resistant zippered front pocket keeps maps dry, and dual ski loops carry your sticks."

 

 

Osprey_Variant_52_pic.jpg

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1-2 days I use CiloGear 45L worksack.

 

Longer than 1 night I use Arc'teryx Needle 55. I'm a big dude with a big appetite and take a lot of food, necessitating a larger pack than people with smaller appetites need.

 

For winter overnight trips I use Osprey Exposure 66.

 

My personal overnight best was taking my oooold school Osprey Aether (the first one they ever made- 30 liters, no frame) on E Ridge Forbidden with about 25 pounds.

 

On the other end of the spectrum I carried 80 pounds in a Dana Terraplane on a 28-day trip in WY. My knees are happy to have retired from NOLS.

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Just curious what it is you guys are climbing that a 40L pack is sufficient for 1 - 3 days?

 

 

I'd vote for a 30L cilogear - best pack I've ever used.

 

Rather than 1-3 days, I think it makes sense to say 2-3 days, and assume there's an overnight or two.

 

I can easily fit a 20degree bag, jetboil, food, rack, a few extra clothes, and then the odds-and-ends (camera, spork, sunblock, ipod, etc). I use my thermarest for the frame/back pad. I tend to put the helmet in last to top it all off, with the rope strapped over the top and along the sides. This is without bringing the detachable lid which seldoms leaves the trailhead. Crampons and tools are strapped on the outside attachment points.

 

 

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50 liter. Specifically the Khasmin 50. Expands to 60 with the kangaroo pocket. Also, you can pair in down by removing the back sheet.

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I second Cilogear 30L.

 

It is astounding how much stuff you can fit in it in addition to being very comfy on my back.

Nobody believes me when I say I used it on Rainier for 3 nights and 4 days.

Tent, rope, rack, half bag, thermorest, food and clothes - inside.

Crampons, tools, 1 picket and helmet - on the outside.

 

Here it is in action:

6843348831_a9dee76c0a_z.jpg

 

Big props to Graham!

 

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Thank you for all of the great replies! I was kind of leaning towards it being too small and after sleeping on it and reading this responses I reached that conclusion. I like my MH bag but I am looking for something a little different. A little simpler, maybe a tad smaller for "climbs" that are more technical hiking than climbing (non technical routes: hood, adams, baker etc.).

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Thank you for all of the great replies! I was kind of leaning towards it being too small and after sleeping on it and reading this responses I reached that conclusion. I like my MH bag but I am looking for something a little different. A little simpler, maybe a tad smaller for "climbs" that are more technical hiking than climbing (non technical routes: hood, adams, baker etc.).
Sounds like the Cylogear might be a good choice for you then. I've never used his packs but they sure look nice if you want simple & durable. Seems most people that have one, really like it. I'd like a smaller one for longer alpine day routes/over-niters. Good luck.

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By the way, you can check but most of the MODEL NUMBERS of the CiloGear work sacks don't represent volume.

 

My "40L" Worksack is the model and it AVERAGES 40 Litres. However, I can stretch it out (by uncompressing and pushing up the straps for the brain) to 65L and I can strip and compress it all the way down to 23L.

 

So, don't be too thrown off. However, some people CAN stuff overnight gear into a pack that small - it definitely is possible depending on the route, the required gear and the choices you make. Going ultralight and ultrapackable, you'd be surprised how small you could get things to fit in a small pack.

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I second Cilogear 30L.

 

It is astounding how much stuff you can fit in it in addition to being very comfy on my back.

Nobody believes me when I say I used it on Rainier for 3 nights and 4 days.

Tent, rope, rack, half bag, thermorest, food and clothes - inside.

Crampons, tools, 1 picket and helmet - on the outside.

 

Here it is in action:

6843348831_a9dee76c0a_z.jpg

 

Big props to Graham!

 

I third the cilogear 30L.

 

I have a 40b nwd and I got a standard 30L that is now becoming my favorite pack. If it does not fit I don't take it, but you can fit a lot in it.

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Adding another vote for the Cilogear 30L. I used to use the 45 all the time but managed to stuff a 4 day/3 night Rainier trip into my 30L a few years ago and the 45 hasn't left the gear bin since. For any trip that I can't make the 30L work for I bump up to either my Golite Gust (~68L, 1lb 5oz empty) or Cilo 60L, depending on how heavy the load is.

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I second BigSky's recommendation. While the HMG ice pack has a couple small issues (i dislike the crampon attachment setup), it is exceptionally comfortable, light, simple. A great pack from a super tiny company.

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