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rocketparrotlet

Winter rock climbing?

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Why is it that in the winter, people tend to head for the alpine instead of the crags? I've noticed that there are very few people who seem to be excited about the idea of a day spent rock climbing in winter when there is any chance of an alpine trip.

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Well for me, fingers get too cold and turn white when cragging. However, if it's sunny in Vantage the south facing crags, of which there are many, are great any time of year. We have climbed there in T-shirts every month of the year.

 

Be careful about driving all the out there on a sunny day. On such days there is often a fog layer over the coulee and then it stays way too cold. If you go to the WSDOT site and check out the real time photos for Silica Road and the Vantage bridge, you can tell if it's sunny or fogggy.

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Good post,

 

It is perhaps that many of us love to ice climb.

 

As for winter rock...

 

Fossil Rock is my vote for the best. It is near sea level, many cliffs stay dry in the rain, and it doesn't seep like the world wall or all other i-90 crags. If you get up early the drive from Seattle isn't bad.

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I've never been to Fossil Rock, can you aid there? I thought it was just sport climbing on conglomerates.

 

I love to ice climb too, just got out 2 days ago and might head out again on Thursday. Was hoping to get out to Index once more before heading back to college (lots of ice climbing in New York but nothing like Index rock) and just wondering about other people's opinions on the subject.

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i'm sure fossil is fuckall for aid - index's yer best cragging bet near you pat - bit of a bitch in winter though, in my very limited experience

 

suuuuuure would like to go up to squampton this spring w/ you though, though i'm not sure either of us could make it through the border :)

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Wait a sec. Are you going to school in New York? There are some ice climbs at Chapel Pond and Poco Moonshine, but the best rock climbing crag in the nation is at New Paltz. It might not be nice THIS week, but you gotta go climbing at the Schawangunks at your first opportunity. Index is really good, but the Gunks is really really good.

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The Gunks are like Seneca - I think they are the same rock - but better. The bedding angle is incut, as opposed to straight up. I have not been to New River Gorge, so my sampling is incomplete. But I think these are the best ever crags. Maybe second to Verdon, in France.

 

The Gunks rule.

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Never made it to the Gunks when I lived in the Old Dominion, but Matt's right, both the Gunks and Seneca are Tuscarora sandstone, a hard quartzite rock of the Tuscarora Formation that runs through PA, MD, VA, and WV. Of this I am absolutely sure for Seneca. The difference is that the bedding angle is nearly vertical at Seneca because of upthrust, whereas at the Gunks, it's horizontally bedded. The rock is nearly bright white and hard as shit...

 

The NRG is composed of a sandstone called Nuttall (sp??). I'm reasonably sure of this. It's a tan rock, and kinda "blobby-looking" in exposed formations. It cuts a bit easier than the Gunks/Seneca rock, but it is still a bitch to drill...

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I'll be sure to check out the Gunks when I get a chance, definitely looking forward to it. I'm going to school at Rensselaer for those who are wondering, probably a little over an hour away. The biggest issue is not having a car (can't afford one) so going anywhere can be difficult.

 

It might sound corny, but Index holds a special place to me because it's the crag I learned to climb at. In addition, I've made all my personal climbing breakthroughs at Index or Squamish so I try to go to those places as much as possible. I've still got some unfinished business at the LTW...

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but the best rock climbing crag in the nation is at New Paltz
Please PM if this is not an appropriate question in this thread. Just curious about this New Paltz crag?? Thanks. Grew up in Woodstock & Pok.

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but the best rock climbing crag in the nation is at New Paltz
Please PM if this is not an appropriate question in this thread. Just curious about this New Paltz crag?? Thanks. Grew up in Woodstock & Pok.

 

Google "the gunks" and you'll find a bunch of info on it. This crag was my first foray into climbing. Awesome place.

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Why is it that in the winter, people tend to head for the alpine instead of the crags? I've noticed that there are very few people who seem to be excited about the idea of a day spent rock climbing in winter when there is any chance of an alpine trip.

 

Not me. I dont like to be cold....so I never got into mountaineering.

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Why is it that in the winter, people tend to head for the alpine instead of the crags? I've noticed that there are very few people who seem to be excited about the idea of a day spent rock climbing in winter when there is any chance of an alpine trip.

1. one can alpine climb with gloves on, can't rock climb with gloves on

2. same can be said for feet with warm boots

3. mountains are more beautiful in winter.

4. less people on classic alpine routes. (for good reason)

5. backcountry skiing

6. we get to crag for many months and those rare clear winter days are a treat

7. we all want to be the new "twight" at least in our own minds

8. got to use all that expensive crap we just bought at the rei garage sale. You know the stuff that lays around unused for 11 months out of the year.

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Google "the gunks" and you'll find a bunch of info on it. This crag was my first foray into climbing. Awesome place.
Oh thanks for responding without a negative comment, I was being a dumbass and didn't realize the gunk and new paltz were the same:blush:

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In my 5 years of living in Western Washington I have learned to take what the weather gives you and let that guide your winter recreation.

For example, Sunday was supposed to be Sunny but very warm. That led me to go rock climbing at index (50 degrees) than hit some ice, the alpine, or ski mush.

Index was wet (surprise! ;) but we still had fun.

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Tons of people rock climb outside in the winter if the weather allows. A lot of people switch to bouldering though, because of short days and quicker drying times.

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Why is it that in the winter, people tend to head for the alpine instead of the crags? I've noticed that there are very few people who seem to be excited about the idea of a day spent rock climbing in winter when there is any chance of an alpine trip.

You're hanging with the wrong crowd.

fossil_002.JPG

Last sunday at Fossil.

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head down to oly mark, the crew there will (hopefully) take my words to heart when i say you're a solid climber and need to get out on some rock. you better be bringing your tools back to school, any climbing clubs that'll take you to those fabled east coast ice destinations?

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Thanks for the good word Keenan! Don't think I can make it down to Oly this time but maybe later. I'm ice climbing chair in my outing club because the position was up for grabs, hopefully I'll be getting some sweet ice out there if I get a chance.

 

EDIT: Looking for a last-minute partner for tomorrow to hit up winter rock, was originally going to do Chair Peak N Face but that fell through and left me with a free day.

Edited by rocketparrotlet

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good luck on your quest mark. The last time he got out was with me on inspiration in early august. too long....

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Why is it that in the winter, people tend to head for the alpine instead of the crags? I've noticed that there are very few people who seem to be excited about the idea of a day spent rock climbing in winter when there is any chance of an alpine trip.

 

Cranking on small holds when it's cold out increases chances of injury significantly (or at least, my experience seems to show it is the case for me)

 

Many view cragging more as practice for the mountains than as an end.

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