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dorianlee

Denali sleeping bag

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I'm playing with the idea of a denali climb next June, and I'm looking for some thoughts on a sleeping bag/ parka situation. Would it be reasonable to use a 0 degree down bag in conjunction with wearing the mighty MH absolute zero parka at night? I've heard this setup is doable, just curious what others who have been up there think.

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It depends upon the quality of the sleeping bag and how warm/cold it is that year. Unless your sleeping bag is unusually large, it is warmer to drape your parka over the bag.

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Would it be reasonable to use a 0 degree down bag in conjunction with wearing the mighty MH absolute zero parka at night?

 

This kind of sleeping arrangement is best suited to someone who has considerable experience with sleeping in the extreme cold. It is one of those "if you gotta ask....." situations. Probably not a good way to go for high altitude ventures unless you are doing something like the cassin, but then it is assumed you would have considerable experience in climbing in the denali range.

 

You will get opinions and tales of "when I was there we didn't need anything warmer than a 0 degree bag", but there situation and your possible situations may be completely different. You may find yourself struggling to stay alive while they had a pleasant spring stroll. What do you want to be prepared for?

 

BTW, I didn't need a down jacket on summit day. :)

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Definitely don't want to rely on it being a warm year, but I will be there later in the season. The MH phantom is one model I've considered.

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You'd survive in a zero degree bag - and probably sleep comfortably most nights. But why chance it? You spend a considerable amount of time in your bag in the AK Range and on Denali you'll spend a considerable amount of time in your bag at high altitude where it can be damn cold. Unless you're gunning for a technical route take a fat warm -15 or -20 bag. If you are gunning for a technical route take a warm bag anyways becuase you'll be hanging out at 14 and 17 camp for a long time while acclimatizing and waiting for good weather.

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Really depends on the season. I've seen -30 at 17k. That's seriously cold and if you haven't spent a bunch of nights up high AND in really cold temps... you're in for a rough ride taking a light weight bag. That being said... I usually take a -10 to AK for high climbs (Denali, St Elias) and have good luck.

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I have a -25 with over fill, FF Peregrine (64/60/39) that has been used for less than 7 nights for sale if you are interested. I'm going up to the Snowy Goose for Everest 2012. Email me at Allen(at)livinginswflorida(dot)com.

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I have a -25 with over fill, FF Peregrine (64/60/39) that has been used for less than 7 nights for sale if you are interested. I'm going up to the Snowy Goose for Everest 2012. Email me at Allen(at)livinginswflorida(dot)com.

 

Hoe much?

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I was on the mountain for 21 days in June-July of this year. I used the REI expedition -20 sleeping bag and I was comfortable throughout the entire climb, from the airstrip to 17,200 camp. I can't recall ever shivering in my bag at night. For a parka I used the First Ascent Peak 15 jacket and found it to be the best combination of warmth, bulk, style, and packability out of any of the other jackets my team mates had. I would recommend a -20 bag as insurance for comfortable sleeping and safety. Hope this helps.

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I would not go back up high in the Alaska Range with nothing less than the best -40 bag. A pound or two more in your pack but good insurance if you get some cold weather. I've suffered with -20 bags enough to have learned my lesson well.

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A lightweight vapor barrier/bag liner is a good idea too. I will never forget the longest night of my life shivering in -55 to -60 below on the north side at only about 10,000 ft. I was thinking, if it's this cold here, what will it be like up high? Turns out, we were MUCH warmer up higher since our camp at 10k was surrounded by 8-10,000 ft walls on all three sides. Still, I'd have paid a fortune to have my buddies CWM instead of my REI -20/pollypro liner/bivy/down parka/booties/mega fleece layers. Once your up there, it's too late to add some fill. Go BIG, I tell ya, GO BIG! Better safe than shiverin all night sorry. Then again, I much prefer heavy and comfy over light and fast. YRMV.

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