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dawuda

Scarpa TX Pro boots and mountaineering

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Hey, i'm just getting into an AT setup. I scored some skis and bindings and then an awesome deal on the TX Pros, but then I started looking closely. They have the bellows with tons of flex in the toe. Does anyone have any idea how these boots would do on a mtn if you had to switch to front pointing instead of skins? Would i be better off with a more rigid AT boot? What are some of you experienced ski mountaineers using for boots that work well for approach, tech climb, and decent? One friend suggested carrying in my mountaineering boots, but certainly that is too much bulk and hassle to switch boots for that section of the climb! Any advice would be great! Thanks

 

dan

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Forgive a silly question but, aren't those telemark boots? They may not work in your AT bindings.

 

Check out the new line of boots from Dynafit, they sound like more what you're looking for as an all around boot.

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they are technically tele boots but claim to be at compatible and have benefits of being lighter and more comfortable for the skin up and any walking because of the bellows. However this also makes them prob too flexible for any serious cramponing. I'm thinking I'll end up selling and going for a stiffer boot. But any advice or experiences are appreciated!

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No question, that model; the TX Pro is a telemark boot. They are not a rigid boot and are intended for free heel skiing. I can't imagine they'd be great for frontpointing with crampons on them, but then I've always been a randonee skier and eschew the telemark at all costs. ;)

 

Like Bronco said check out the offerings from Dynafit and perhaps Garmont's AT boots, possibly the Maestrale.

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I use the Scarpa F3 boot and has similar design to the Scarpa XT Pro. The XT pro is a telemark boot that uses the NTN binding. NTN bindings do not use a boot with the standard (duck bill) boot. The XT Pro is also dynafit compatible. The F3’s also has a flexible toe but is strictly an AT boot. I have never had any problem with too much flex while using crampons and front pointing with them.

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I agree with ilookeddown, and the AT-only posters may need to do a little more homework (Tele - the horror! Does that mean, I would have to not be weak?). I ski mostly tele but also have the Scarpa F3 for use when I AT. The TX Pro feels a lot stiffer than the F3, which works great with crampons. For AT skiing and general mountaineering, I LOVE having a flexible bellow. For anything short of vertical ice, they work great. So much nicer to have your foot flex a little. Kinda why Koflach engineered some flex in their plastic mountaineering boots. I doubt I will ever ski (meaning tour) AT without a bellow again. They climb rock way better too. This Spring, I did the Stuart Glacier Couloir/West Ridge with F3s and they worked great.

 

You DO need to get a shim (made by Scarpa or maybe Dynafit) which slots in the Dyanfit crampon slot to prevent the bellows from flexing when you switch to downhill mode.

 

Actually, if those TX Pros are sized 26.5/27, forget everything I said, they really, really suck. What an incredibly dumb idea to combine the benefits of both boot systems! Since I'm a nice guy, I will be happy to get you out of your mistake at a minor loss. I am serious, PM me if you wanna sell them.

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I stand somewhat corrected, on the new hybrid AT/Telemark boots (tech fitting compatible), in light of the comments directly above this post. Lacking the duckbill, cramponing as ilookeddown indicates probably isn't much of a concern in climbing the sorts of terrain you're likely to be attempting in a randonee boot anyway.

It may be best if you're attempting to become a randonee skier to stick to a strictly AT/Randonee boot.

 

FWIW I'm currently skiing the DYNAFIT ZZERO4 GREEN MACHINE TF, and a pair of BD Methods.

 

Certainly look into the DYNAFIT TLT 5 PERFORMANCE TF SKI or DYNAFIT TLT 5 MOUNTAIN TF-X SKI boots for reportedly the best climbing and skiing performance. Ask Dane Burns (or visit coldthistle.com) about these boots as I've no direct experience with either. Numerous regular posters on this forum do however.

 

Best of luck in your ski/boot/binding quest. There's quite an array of worthwhile choices out there at the present time. Now when I started,...

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Thanks for the imput guys!

 

Sounds like I should maybe put the boot to the test on some crampons and see how they do and decide after that.

 

 

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I think you need to consider what grades of climbs you plan to do. If it's all Alpine or Water Ice 3 then you can get away with whatever works best for your preferred style of skiing.

 

When you start climbing harder ice or mixed things get tricky.

 

Heavy, stiff boot suck when climbing, and light flexible boots rule. The question is where do you need the flex. If you're in crampons all the time you want ankle flexibility but a stiff foot bed is just fine.

 

I got some of the new Dynafit TLT 5s last winter. Each boot weighs a pound lighter than one of my old Megas. They have a vibram sole with a rocker design. The ankle flexibility is crazy. In climb mode they're almost like light hiking shoes, but they lock down solid for skiing. I know I suck for product plugging but...

 

I'm not familiar with they bindings or boots ilookeddown is talking about. If they eliminated the duck bill that is an advantage for climbing ice. It all boils down to how hard do you want to climb, and try before you buy.

 

You'll have to figure out what kind of fashion statement you want to make ;) Splitboarder comment in 5, 4, 3...

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Sounds like I should maybe put the boot to the test on some crampons and see how they do and decide after that.
I think you'll be pleasantly surprised at what you can climb in them.

 

I've climbed up to grade 3 in two buckle T2 tele boots (traditional duckbill and much more flexible than TX Pros) with BD Sabretooths. Not ideal, but it'll get the job done.

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