Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
nutpick

first ascent [TR] Valhalla Range, South Selkirks - FA:Étoile Filante IV 5.11c, 300m, S face of Asgard 7/23/2011

Recommended Posts

Trip: Valhalla Range, South Selkirks - FA:Étoile Filante IV 5.11c, 300m, S face of Asgard

 

Date: 7/23/2011

 

Trip Report:

A new route put up this summer by David Lussier and Cam Shute. full trip report here with photos .

 

Étoile Filante IV 5.11c, 300m, South Face of Asgard Peak

F.A. David Lussier and Cam Shute, July 2011

 

The story behind the line

The South Face of Asgard has attracted climbers for almost 40 years. The first route up this sheer featured wall, the “Center Route IV 5.8”, was climbed by Valhalla pioneers Peter Koedt, Peter Rowat along with Greg Shannon in 1973. Peter Koedt returned to Asgard a few years later, in 1975, to climb the “Left-Center Route IV 5.8” with James Hamelin and Jara Popelkova. These two traditional routes follow the most dominant features on the face and continue to challenge climbers to this day. They offer varied climbing (cracks, flakes & chicken heads) with interesting route finding along with sustained difficulty. Up until now these where the only established routes on the south face.

 

The vision of a new route on this face has been shared by many over the years. From various trips in Mulvey Basin over the years, I had always been interested by the complexity of the upper right side of the wall. It wasn’t until July 2010 that Cam Shute and I ventured into Mulvey with the intention of exploring that potential. Due to the disconnected nature of the crack systems, some blank looking section and the steepness of the wall, we decided to bring a hammer drill along with some bolts. This exploratory trip, culminating with a high point somewhere half way up the steep upper right wall, revealed the potential for a great line on featured but compact rock. We were already planing our return.

 

Our vision evolved some more before we returned in July 2011. With a greater knowledge about the nature of the rock and the various line options we decided to bring the drill again. We were considering bolting an interesting looking blank arête to help straighten the lower part of the route and also using bolts for adequate protection on the upper compact wall. If the route turned out to be good quality, we also contemplated bolting the belays to facilitate rappelling. All of this would of course be done while climbing from the bottom. We were very excited about possibly finishing the route.

 

The end result was greater than anticipated. The vision, our skills and luck combined with our commitment allowed us to complete a new modern mixed (bolts/trad) route up the beautiful right side of the South Face. A lot of the visioning and actual route location decisions beautifully came together over the 4 days Cam and I were working on the wall. The climbing on the direct arête lower down (pitch 2) was challenging and quality while providing a more direct line. The intricacies of the steep upper wall revealed themselves after a few days of committing route finding on the sharp end. In someways the route revealed itself and we basically connected the dots. Completing it was very satisfying but putting the puzzle together was the best part. We really hope that others get to enjoy this quality and modern alpine rock route, feel free to download the topo and route description just below.

Access and Description

topo

 

Name background

“Étoile Filante” is french for “Shooting Star”. The name choice comes as a tribute to Valhalla pioneer Peter Koedt who sadly passed away in the fall of 2010. The inspiration for the name comes from the song “Étoile Filante” by “Les Cowboy Fringant”. This beautiful song compares each human’s life existence, turmoils, successes and absurdity to the passage of a shooting star. We feel Peter was a visionary climber who put lots of skills and creativity amongst the Valhalla peaks. We will remember his passage and contribution as a brilliant shooting star.

Edited by nutpick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey David do you know if the rockfall scars have affected the difficulty of the Centre Route at all? We were at the base in 2008 all ready for an ascent when we found what seemed to be one the the centre route belays, complete with old webbing and a rusty pin, in the fresh rockfall debris.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome! That is a spectacular face. I remember reading your summit log book entry after we climbed the much tamer SE Ridge of Asgard in August. If ever I am capable of 11c trad I will put this one on my to-do list :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is actually Cam, and I reposted David's TR here. Not sure what to expect on the centre route wrt to anchors...even according to peter koedt the line is not stellar. midway up it gets pretty runout and the line doesn't really follow the main weakness. we were in the vicinity of the lower half of this while putting up this route, and the nature of the face is that while there's not tons of gear, you can usually find something that will work as a belay, but bring pins. The left side route is in good shape, and a bolt has been added to P1 and P2 (with peter koedt's blessing) as well as a bolted station at the top of P2. Hope that helps...it's a great face.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×