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Dave7

Tent help

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So right now I have decided its time for my first mountaineering tent and need some advice.

 

Hilleberg Jannu vs Bibler Eldorado

 

My thoughts: The Jannu has excellent reviews, a rather lightweight for a 2 wall tent at 6 lbs 6oz (can be stripped down to a little over 5). However it is expensive at $735 and I have seen 0 sales on it over the past 3-4 months.

 

The Eldorado has reviewed well for a single wall tent, weighing in at a little over 4 lbs (good for going light and fast) and I found one on sale for a reasonable price for $475. Downside is that it does not come with a vesti, and venting can be somewhat of an issue.

 

Thoughts?

 

About me, I am fairly new to climbing, but I enjoy alpine climbing and mountaineering. I have been doing it for a little over a year now. I want something that will last and progress with me to bigger objectives (Denali maybe?)

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I have a bit of experience with the Bibler Eldorado, though none with the Jannu.

 

I had the older version of the Eldorado with the two vestibules already attached. I believe they have shaved a few pounds off in the new design.

 

It was pretty torn up when I scored it from some hippie lady who had an epic on Rainier or something. One vestibule was mostly torn off and the other was decently shredded, as well as there being a 1.5 ft tear in one side of the tent.

I mention this because it was easy to repair and held up very well to abuse after it was repaired.

 

Most extreme conditions I had it out was in full winter conditions pitched about 8000ft on the top of an unsheltered ridge. Tent poles required some body-weight on them due to the high winds, just make sure you're the one to sleep on the lee side or guy it down nice and tight and you won't have to worry about it.

 

Putting the tent up in high winds is made easier by the poles inserting from the inside, just crawl in and assemble.

 

Single wall makes it easy to separate the load with a partner, the fabric portion packed down pretty small and compact with no fly to worry about. There was usually some frozen condensation in the morning, only negative it has. The new design looks like it has vents in the roof where mine had none.

 

All in all I recommend this tent. Get the vestibule if you can afford it, well worth the extra $$. Never used a footprint, but it was always pitched in the snow.

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May also want to look at the North face assault 2 and Sierra designs Convert 2

 

Both tents come with a removable vestibule, are single wall, waterproof breathable material, and pretty light. The Assault is lighter stripped but the Convert 2 is a bit nicer and more flexible. I had both and now just have the Assault as it's a bit lighter stripped (just under 3lbs)

 

285167_598213330378_184700619_32520548_3350358_n.jpg

 

both of these tents I would not want to spend many days stuck in a storm in them. They are small and cramped (most single walls) but for light and fast the only way to go.

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Stepenson Warmlite makes two double-wall two-man tents for around $600 that weigh under three pounds. 2R is roomy for two, 2C is two feet shorter.

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I love my Hille and have had it for about two years now. Super lightweight and it's double wall, which is a huge selling point in my opinion for any alpinism in the Cascades. I've spent similar weather situations in both a single wall Bibler and my Hille and I'd take the Hille hands down; kept me drier. I haven't had experience with the exact models you're looking at, but that was the case with the ones I've tried.

 

Also, Hilleberg's North American office is in Redmond. So if you live in the Puget Sound area and need help or parts, call them up and pop on by. They're very helpful and great people.

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I got a Nammatj 2 this past spring and used it in the AK Range. I loved it. Super light (under 6lbs) for a very roomy 2 person tent. I checked out the Jannu and was considering it but opted for the heavier fabric for Alaska Range trips. The Jannu looks quite bomb and is super light for the size. I'd consider either the Jannu or the Nallo over any single wall out there.

 

FWIW I used an Integral Designs MKXL for years and was quite fond of it for winter trips. However it sucks for summer.

 

PS - tent specs below for when I was looking at tents:

Tent / Length (in) / Width (in) / Height (in) / Weight / Cost

Integral Designs MK3 / 88 / 54 / 45 / 7 lbs / $700

Integral Designs MK1XL / 86 / 46 / 39 / 6lbs 1oz / $650

Bibler I-Tent / 82 / 48 / 42 / 6lbs 4oz / $700

Bibler Eldo / 87 / 51 / 43 / 7lbs 7oz / $700

Bibler Fitzroy / 93 / 60 / 40 / 8lbs 7oz / $800

Hilleberg Nallo 2 / 87 / 52 / 40 / 5lbs

Hilleberg Nallo3 / 87 / 64 /42 / 5lbs / $580

 

Hilleberg Nammatj2 / 87 / 52 / 38 / 5lbs 5oz / $575

Hilleberg Nammatj3 / 87 / 64 / 42 / 6lbs 5oz / $615

Hilleberg Jannu / 93 / 57 / 40 / 6lbs / $735

Marmot Alpinist / 88 / 52 / 40 / 5 lbs 4 oz / $495

Sierra Designs Covert2 / 85 / 54 / 45 / 6lbs 10oz / $450

 

NF Mountain25 / 84 / 54 / 39 / 8 lbs 3 oz

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I was going by average packed weight on the Black Diamond site and included the vestibule for everything. They list the tent as 5 lb 1 oz and the vestibule as 1 lb 6 oz.

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What about the Stephenson's Warmlite tents? I personally own the Integral Designs MK1XL, but I've always wondered if the Warmlite tents perform as well as they claim. If so, they're lighter than any other tent on the market. To add to your chart:

 

Stephenson's Warmlite 2R / 134 / 60 / 41-26 / 2lbs 12oz / $500+options = ~$575

Stephenson's Warmlite 2C / 110 / 60 / 41-26 / 2lbs 9.5oz / $500+options = ~$575

Edited by skibum14

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I just returned from Rainier and used my Hilli Kaitum 3GT http://www.hilleberg.com/home/products/kaitum/kaitum3gt.php. Out of our group of 10 or so tents this tent was the envy. When the weather was bad, and rain on the lower mountain and the Bibles, BD's, and MH's had water in them, all our gear was totally dry with more than amble room for a complete dug in kitchen in one end. When two tents blew away in 70+mph winds on the upper mountain mine had no problem. One minute, and one step, pitch of both the inner and the outer at the same time and then if you want to, or need to sleep 5 or more, just use the ground sheet (which covers the entire outer footprint vestibules and all, and you can accommodate I would estimate 8-10 or a group shelter.

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What about the Stephenson's Warmlite tents?

When I was looking I didn't include the Stephenson tents or the super light BD bivy tents (Firstlight etc.) in my list of tents becuase of their limited usage. Those tents are made for alpine / snow only and aren't so great in rainy environments. If I were looking only for a high alpine bivy tent I'd go with the Firstlight.

 

That said -- if you want a good laugh email Stephenson's tents and request a catalog. Classy 70s marketing with lots of naked people in tents and sleeping bags.

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What about the Stephenson's Warmlite tents?

When I was looking I didn't include the Stephenson tents or the super light BD bivy tents (Firstlight etc.) in my list of tents becuase of their limited usage. Those tents are made for alpine / snow only and aren't so great in rainy environments. If I were looking only for a high alpine bivy tent I'd go with the Firstlight.

Yeah, I have the Firstlight as well, and definitely agree that it shouldn't be used in the rain. Didn't realize that was also true of the Stephenson's tents also...do you have any reason for grouping those two together other than the weight? In other words, how do you know the Stephenson's performs poorly in rain? I've been looking intermittently, but never came across a review stating something to that effect.

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Yeah, I have the Firstlight as well, and definitely agree that it shouldn't be used in the rain. Didn't realize that was also true of the Stephenson's tents also...do you have any reason for grouping those two together other than the weight? In other words, how do you know the Stephenson's performs poorly in rain? I've been looking intermittently, but never came across a review stating something to that effect.

 

Just going on what friends have told me - I don't actually have any first hand experience. My main reason for grouping was a combination of weight and durability. I'm pretty careless when it comes to caring for gear so it gets trashed pretty fast. Thus I lean towards heavier stuff so it lasts a little longer.

 

PS - if you want more info on Stephenson google "Stephenson site:backpackinglight.com"

 

 

Edited by wfinley

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Yeah, I have the Firstlight as well, and definitely agree that it shouldn't be used in the rain. Didn't realize that was also true of the Stephenson's tents also...do you have any reason for grouping those two together other than the weight? In other words, how do you know the Stephenson's performs poorly in rain? I've been looking intermittently, but never came across a review stating something to that effect.

 

Just going on what friends have told me - I don't actually have any first hand experience. My main reason for grouping was a combination of weight and durability. I'm pretty careless when it comes to caring for gear so it gets trashed pretty fast. Thus I lean towards heavier stuff so it lasts a little longer.

 

PS - if you want more info on Stephenson google "Stephenson site:backpackinglight.com"

 

I have used a Stephenson Warmlite tent for some time now. I bought it back in 2002 and I have put it through its paces since then. It's been used heavily in diverse environments including Bolivia, Patagonia, Washington, Utah, Colorado and Canada. It's stood up to gale force winds, snowstorms and downpours. I have the 2 walled version with side windows. This allows it to truely be a 4 season tent. It gets a lot of condensation on the ends (single wall) and I bring a camp towel to wipe it down with. From the desert to the cascades to high altitude mountaineering, it has performed flawlessly. The only down-sides are the lack of a vestibule and that it is not freestanding. However, as a tube tent it is very easy to set up in the wind. I stake the back from a single point, insert the poles, orient the front end according to the wind and place 2 stakes in the front. Using this method it stood up to 100+ MPH winds in Patagonia without a problem. It's lighter than 2 bivy sacks and a whole lot more comfortable and safer. Wy wife just used it for a 7 day solo backpacking trip along the Colorado Trail that featured nightly thunderstorms without a problem even though it's 9 years old and I only sealed the seams once when I first got it. If it ever wears out (no signs of that yet) I would replace it with another. Anyways, that's my $0.02.

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Good timing of this post, I was able to find a Jannu on sale. Looking forward to testing it out on Rainier and Baker in September.

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Hello.

 

IMG_23552.JPG[/img]

 

I know people may scoff at this, but I bought this 6 lb tent for mountaineering and winter camping, and it's been great. The reviews for it are also very good and consistent. You absolutely cannot beat the price. Photo prior to storm in the Canadian Rockies above treeline:

 

http://www.rei.com/product/794285/rei-arete-3-asl-tent

 

Brad

 

 

 

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try to get johndavidjr to chime in. He has some serious tent knowledge that will help save some coin.

 

I can't speak as highly of my RAB Summit Mountain as mneagle or wfinely of their tents. But haven't had a bad experience of it--but it has never wowed me other than just being uber-bomber once guyed out (zilch flap). It is made of eVent, so breathes decent. But it is no frills at all--no vents/windows/ports. Door, screen door, built on triangular guy pouches on 3 sides. 2 donut tie-throughs if you're camping in that sketch of a place. not for all people. winter bags with 2 will make edges and foot contact for sure, not a lot of extra space inside. 4 'hanging' side pockets. Could rig a gear loft pretty easy tho. fairly easy to setup.

 

I find the vestibule for it to kinda stink--not easy to setup, too many lines and cords and tie-offs. 5# with the vest, 4#s without.

 

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yes two can sit up in it sure. I'm 5'8" and it is fine for me. If I was 6'2" it might be a different story. my winter bag has event shell so i dont worry about side touching really.

You could definitely rig a hanging stove, tho all you have is door for venting (that is why I am slightly dismayed no rear port or top vents that would kind of help the whole cooking in the tent deal.

 

I have summit mnt which is 'normal' vs the summit bivi or the version that is only 30 inches high--that one has a rear port at least (oddly missing from the summit mountain).

 

It is very solid and not a complaint with how it functions as it is suppose to, so maybe in the world of gear that is all you need in a review. But at the time I was a little obsessed with RAB and eVent and was able to get it for around 300 so I moved on that vs the 500-700 for some of the other tents i looked at like exped polaris, etc. If I could lug it to the top of adams or rainier I have no doubt about its performance once guyed out--burly and cuts the wind from 3 directions easy, and from the front door if you used the guys on either of the front vertices.

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