Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
Alasdair

Wildlife of the cascades

Recommended Posts

Ok dont know if many of you guys care about this, but I put together this blog post last week with photos and some information of all the wildlife I have seen and photographed above treeline in the Cascades. For some of the birds I included links to the call since most of us hear the birds but never see them (click the links, I guarantee you have heard these bird calls if you ever pay attention).

 

Hope you enjoy the photos, and I would love to know what other things I am missing in this list. What birds and animals have you guys seen above tree line in the cascades? Yea I dont have a photo of a bushy tailed woodrat. I would love to get one, but it would likely be impaled on an ice axe pick. I also dont have a kangaroo mouse on the blog, but I do have a photo of one I need to dig up.

 

Here is the link to the post.

http://alasdairturner.blogspot.com/2011/07/animals-and-birds-of-washingtons-alpine.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder how common the Hermit Thrush is around here (even though the range map shows it in this area). I may have heard these, but I much more often hear the Swainson's Thrush. Slightly, but noticeably different call.

 

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Swainsons_Thrush/sounds

 

Nice blog post though, it is cool to see some familiar faces. . . . Let me know if you want a pic of a ptarmigan in winter plumage to use on the blog.

 

No snaffles though???? Have you never had the pleasure of meeting one up close and personal? :pagetop:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hermit thrush is more common near treeline, swainsons deeper in the forest. Swainsons are very common at index. I have a bunch of ptarmigan in winter plumage photos, I just have not uploaded them yet. I would love to see the photos though.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah....thanks for the clarification on the thrushes. Are the rosy finches the ones you see sometimes very high around the summits, flying in small flocks? If so, I agree with the Commander- they do show up in the most unusual places.

 

When I get home I will try and upload a winter ptarmigan photo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

June-2011middle_sis_KaraAl-24.jpg

rosy crowned finch

 

not the best, not the worst. i only have 3x zoom and was about 20ft away or so. taken 2011 on middle sister, oregon

Edited by Water

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice post, that's an interesting list. I think you're more correct to put the Anna's Hummingbird up since I'm fairly certain that the range for the Ruby-throated Hummingbird doesn't extend this far west. Maybe you are thinking of the Rufous Hummingbird? I see those quite often.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nice post, that's an interesting list. I think you're more correct to put the Anna's Hummingbird up since I'm fairly certain that the range for the Ruby-throated Hummingbird doesn't extend this far west. Maybe you are thinking of the Rufous Hummingbird? I see those quite often.

I was camped at Squamish once and a Rufous Hummingbird somehow got inside the van at 6am and proceeded to buzz around frantically until we opened the door and let it out. An exciting wake up call!

 

BTW - beautiful shot of the hummingbird -- it's super sharp!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome photos and spot on with the raven description; they make camp stories so much more fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×