Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
brad

Newborn found at base of Leavenworth crag

Recommended Posts

I believe it is a Western Pacific Rattlesnake. This was at the power tower. I have seen no less than 5 snakes already this season in the tumwater. especially the last couple of weeks. I almost put my hand on an adult last thursday. Scared the shit out of me. That combined with two black bear encounters in two weeks has me feeling a little on edge lately, especially off trail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Careful of the baby rattlesnakes, they don't have venom dosage control and a bite is much more likely to be severe/lethal than an adult rattlesnake. (It sure is cute though!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recall from a zoology class in college that spring was a bad time to get bitten by a rattlesnake because their venom sacs are full after hibernating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Careful of the baby rattlesnakes, they don't have venom dosage control and a bite is much more likely to be severe/lethal than an adult rattlesnake. (It sure is cute though!)

From Loma Linda University Medical Center website

Many people believe that a baby rattlesnake is more dangerous than an adult rattlesnake. However, a large rattlesnake is more likely to deliver much more venom than a baby rattlesnake. In the clinical experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center, large rattlesnakes cause more serious injuries than baby rattlesnakes.

 

http://lomalindahealth.org/medical-center/our-services/emergency/programs-and-divisions/venom-er/resources/when-snakes-strike.page

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

definitely not a rattler...biggest give-away is the shape of the head...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that is a gopher snake. It doesn't have the triangular shaped head that a rattler does nor the pit organ depression that all pit vipers have. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crotalinae

 

As for the baby debate, I recall learning in WFR that rattlesnakes are more likely use venom in a bite than older snakes, who will bite for defense without using venom. When adult snakes use venom the dose is higher, which is still inline with the previously posted article. So it would seem that you're more likely to be injected with venom by a young snake, but more likely to suffer venomous effects if an older snake uses their venom.

 

"Rattlesnakes are born with fully functioning fangs capable of injecting venom and can regulate the amount of venom they inject when biting. Generally they deliver a full dose of venom to their prey, but may deliver less venom or none at all when biting defensively. A frightened or injured snake may not exercise such control. Young snakes are also dangerous,[4] and should not be treated with any less caution than the adults."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rattlesnake

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although it was more exciting to think it was a rattlesnake i must agree on the gopher snake ID.

This one was NOT a gopher snake

 

Untitled_1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×