Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
olyclimber

RIP David Pinegar

Recommended Posts

Oh damn it. I didn't know Dave well, but he was a good guy. Too many damn deaths this year. Everyone take care and condolences to all who knew Dave.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All my best thoughts go out to David's loved ones. I do well remember his TR's, informative and engaging.

 

Cautious all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a lot of folks out there in the world who, it seems, if they left us in a hurry, would be remembered 'bout as long as, say, the duration of that hole in a bucket of water that's left when you pull your hand out. I will remember David Pinegar considerably longer than that.

 

On the evening of February 17, 2008, I'd been out and about, somewhere or other. I don't remember exactly, and it's not getting any better. But on my way home, I decided to take a run up to Baker. I can do that, on a whim; I'm very lucky that way, for sure. There wasn't a lot of daylight left, and the sun was just about down on the horizon. A hard wind was blowing out of the southwest, a cold hard wind. The weather was changing, I'm sure, and because of that I was careful to stay above the summit. I knew I only had about ten minutes before I'd have to dive for home. But as I came around the northeast side of the summit plateau, I was absolutely stunned to see a human being approaching the top, with skis on their back. Late in the day, darkness looming, sun still scraping across the sastrugi up there, I have the greatest respect for skiers but I knew there was absolutely no way that person would be coming down from that position that night. I suppose a few of you know how fond I am of saying "Holy Shit!" Well, I might have said that a few times, though nobody was listening. And I really meant it. I circled and took photographs. I didn't know who it was, but I guessed they'd know who I was. In a few minutes, they were at the summit. To escape the wind, I watched as that hardy soul huddled on the northeast side of Grant Peak. I was freezing my ass off, and I was pretty well protected. Can you imagine how cold it was down there? I'm not one to disturb someone's wilderness experience more than necessary, so after a few circuits, not too close, and a lot of photographs, I turned down to the southeast. When I landed, the sun was well down. It was late enough that Walter Keilt, one of the old guys there, a WWII B24 pilot who ought to know, would say, gettin in a bit late, aren't you? And I knew I'd sure better listen to that wisdom. But I also knew, I was safe on the ground, and somebody was still up there at the top of Baker, and it was night, in the middle of god damned winter.

 

A couple of days later, sure enough, I got a message. It was from David Pinegar. We'd never communicated previously. That was me down there, did you see me when you flew over? Yes, as a matter of fact, I did. And I tell you what, David, I can still see you down there. Just like it was yesterday: http://www.pbase.com/nolock/image/93119389

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

holy shit that's a fine eulogy there, john - we'd all be lucky to live a life that could be capped w/ that :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wise king do not grieve

it is always better to avenge dear ones

than to indulge in mourning

for every one of us living in this world

means waiting for our end

let he who can achieve glory before death

when a warrior is gone

that will be his best and only bulwark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember that TR, and that picture in particular. There's something really powerful about that image.

 

You can feel the weight of the cold through the monitor, some of the last shards of sunlight in the lower 48 are retreating from the summit, and night is closing in. Then there's that *one* guy alone in the middle of it all, leaning towards the summit and punching steps, 'teeth in the wind.'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not often I shed a tear, especially for someone I didn't know. I did for Dave.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well said John. That TR and your images stuck with me as well . . .RIP David.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

very sad to hear...i remember John's pics and was quite impressed at David's endeavor on Baker

 

is there any more word as to why his rope failed on rappel?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was sad to hear the news. I got a message regarding David right before I left on a trip. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember really enjoying that Baker TR and thinking, man, now that's gutsy.

 

This man's passing is a real loss, no doubt. He was one of a rare breed for sure.

 

May his family's bereavement be assuaged by the knowledge he lived life fully, and on his own terms.

 

d

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the story John. And while I only met David a few times, many of my friends knew him well. Best of luck in the great snowy ranges, far from sight...in the hazy distances David.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×