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jhiggy

Mt Hood Gear list?

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Hello! 2 buddies and I are going to climb Mt Hood in May and I was just wondering what a typical climbing party brings up for a spring accent? I'm mostly curious about technical gear but it wouldn't hurt to see what people typically bring up for individual gear as well. Thanks a ton for the help!

 

Edit: Sorry I should have mentioned that we are doing the south side old chute/pearly(depending on conditions) in late May.

Edited by jhiggy

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ice axe, crampons, helmet. Maybe a rope, harness, and a few pickets if you want to be safe and know how to use it.

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What DPS said... Plus maybe a shovel. It's kinda wide open to the elements/wind. Have had to dig a pit before to get out of the crazy high wind.

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What map are you using? For Mt. Hood Hogsback? I was recommend "Green Trails #462S Mount Hood/Timberline Trail." When I went to the green trails site they had two Mt. Hood maps I was not sure which to buy.

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Good point about the map. Some type of way-back device would be prudent e.g. wands, GPS, map with waypoints and compass bearings should you encounter poor visibility.

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Yeah...I agree...having a map and compass and knowing how to use it might be a good idea. Maybe.

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I am sorry I should have clarified, my question was for myself, which map do people use? I am also climbing Mt. Hood in late June. I can use a map and compass-waypoints. I was wondering if anyone had a recommendation for which map was better. As I said I was recommend "Green Trails #462S Mount Hood/Timberline Trail." map but on the Green Trails Web site their were two choices. (I might have typed the wrong info in which is possible.) Their was just a Mt. Hood map and a Timberline trail map. Which I know wraps around the mountain but does not go to the summit. I need a summit map. That has detail of different routes.

 

Or is it pretty easy to determine where you are going?

 

Thank-you

Jamie

 

 

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Hi jamebill,

 

I can't answer your question specifically, but I would say get the largest scale map of the south side you can find be it Green Trails, USGS, custom map, etc. The route finding is pretty straight forward if the visibility is fine.

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Thank-you DPS.

Sorry another question. I am taking a friend up the climb. I know how to use pickets. How long a rope should I bring. I have a small light 8mm 30m rope for glacier travel. Is that enough or should I bring the 60m for the top section past the bergschrund. I have read a lot of people don't rope up...we were going to. I guess long is that section is my question?

 

Again thank-you for taking the time to answer my questions,

Jamie

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I think a 30m x 8mm would be perfect. The last time I climbed hood the easiest route to the summit was climber's left of the old chute. If conditions are similar to what I last saw, there really were no steep sections on the left hand side, but the old chute was maybe 50 meters of steep ice, something I would have wanted a second tool for.

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The first climb up a volcano is such a sweet experience. Everything is new and exciting. Remembering that feeling makes me want to take up something new. Or travel to someplace new.

 

Good luck jamebill and let us know how things go for you. Send photos of smiles.

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Don't ever underestimate Hood. There's dead bodies still up there of people that underestimated Hood.

 

this is like a minimum non-negotiable list, in addition to all the regular stuff like already mentioned, helmet, axe etc.

 

Shovel (at least 1 for the party, and know how to dig a snow cave)

Stove (at least 1 for the party)

Fuel (enough for 3 days to melt snow for water)

Pot

1 foam pad per person (3/4 okay)

1 puff jacket per person

Wind/rain gear, including pants, this is more for the wind

extra gloves, can easily get lost in the wind

1 bivy sack for the party, in case someone gets hurt.

 

other things you might want, to keep from getting turned around by conditions

 

touk or turtlefur

goggles

mitts

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Nobody forgets to bring their pot. You might add a pan to go with the stove and fuel, though. Dave A.

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Pot will not help you if Hood decides to come after you. People have been found in their snow cave, frozen like popsicles with their pot by their side doing nothing.

 

It's dangerous to tell people that pot is going to save them from the dreaded Hood when it's not going to happen.

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I thought it was funny. I don't think a new climber would read Dave A's post and think 'Oh, pot, why didn't I think of that? The lifesaving properties are so obvious.'

 

Stove, foamy, bivi sack, shovel, puffy, etcs certainly is not a bad idea, but may give new climbers a false sense of security. Didn't the three fellows who died on the North Face a few winter's ago have all that shit?

 

 

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Stove, foamy, bivi sack, ... Didn't the three fellows who died on the North Face a few winter's ago have all that shit?

 

No, they left it behind so they could travel light. Edited by pcg

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I think most important is taking a hard look at the forecast and making sure you have a minimum couple day window without precip. AS when the clouds move in and everything goes white is when it gets interesting, especially if you are unfamiliar with the terrain and you could be forced to hunker down. If its clear,you can always find your way down.

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Stove, foamy, bivi sack, ... Didn't the three fellows who died on the North Face a few winter's ago have all that shit?

 

No, they left it behind so they could travel light.

My mistake. I suppose the take home message is if you are going to go light, you should probably go fast, also.

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I suppose the take home message is if you are going to go light, you should probably go fast, also.
and don't fall...

They apparently had an accident, and because they were traveling alpine style they were unable to successfully cope with it.

Edited by pcg

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