Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
kingfrankiv

Alpine Climbing Pants

Recommended Posts

I am looking for a good pair of alpine climbing pants to do some local peaks in such as Rainier, Adams, Baker, and Hood. All I could find on google was some ski pants. I need some 100% waterproof and not baggy. Looking to spend under $200 if possible

 

Thanks

Frank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. Thats not to badly priced. The weather is always so mixed the last thing I want is wet underwear. I was looking at the Cohesion from Mountain hardwear. Any thoughts?

 

Edited by kingfrankiv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you need waterproof pants, then you didn't look at the weather forecast.

 

but if you need waterproof/breathable, any cheap lightweight pair will do as it should be sitting in your pack 99% of the time. Honestly.

 

I have a pair of dead bird (arcteryx) very lightweight pants that I carry almost every alpine venture and worn it 2 times in 10 years that I have owned it.

 

If you wear any kind of waterproof/breathable pant on washington volcano, you will get wet underwear from sweat anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frank, you don't need one pair of pants, you need three pairs:

 

1) Base layer for insulation, comfort and moisture wicking ( polypro, silk etc.)

2) Insulation layer (Fleece, wool etc.)

3) Waterproof layer (gortex, coated nylon etc.)

 

Add and remove layers as required. Don't forget to wear nylon shorts over your polypro as a courtesy to fellow climbers.

 

Personally I have a pair of pants made from Schoeller stretchy fabric which is a good balance of water/wind resistant and breathable. I use them for everything from backcountry skiing to alpine rock to volcano slogs and hiking - just adding a layer underneath or on top as conditions require (as described above). I have had them for almost 15 years and just this year I am looking for a new pair b/c they have worn a hole in the butt. Got them for $20 at the MEC garage sale.

Edited by bstach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wear a pair of Stoic Overhang pants from Backcountry. Got them on Steep and Cheap for like $50. They're labeled "highly water resistant" and I'll vouch for that. I used them on mountains, rainy hikes, rock, you name it. Pretty darn water resistant. When it really gets wet, I usually have a layer on underneath, so any dampness isn't noticed. I always pack pant shells, but in my short climbing career, haven't used them. If it is raining, unless it's pissing rain, I don't care. They're a softshell material. Drawbeck is the side pockets are mesh and don't zip. So when you get snow in them...

 

So something water resistant, durable (DWR?!) is good for almost anything.

 

In other news, those NWAlpine pants look sweet... I might have to check into that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are "regular" person you will have a great choices from Marmot, Outdoor Research, Mammut, Millet, Stoic and many more. Climbing in GTX is hard because you will destroy your pants easily. Especially Gore Paclite. You can't even sit on the grass in those.

 

I am having hard time to find good fitting pants.

I wear short inseam pants and choices are very limited: Marmot Scree & Cortina, Mammut Courmayer Advanced & Fiamma short and Arcteryx Gamma AR. That's it. I don't know any other .. Do you? In dry conditions, I mostly climb in 3/4 like Arteryx and Millet. Arcteryx sell them for 20$ (sometimes) but they are not water resistant.

 

My ski pants are Marmot Randonnee short. GTX ... I would climb Rainier in that pants for sure.

 

Short inseam is 28-29in. Most pants are 33in in regular. That is very bad for some of us but great for many of you. Some pants have zippers on the bottom so you can't shorten them easily.

Edited by Zoran

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like simple but very breathable soft shell pants for alpine climbng. I have good goretex versions but haven't used them in several years, even in the worst weather.

 

But I think the soft shell revolution is a NA thing. As I seldom saw Europeans climbing in soft shells this spring.

Something to be learned there I think.

 

NWAlpine makes a great salopette which is one of my favorite as is the Gamma LT from Arcteryx. Just hate paying the Arcteryx prices for pants that will eventually get shreaded by crampons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As I seldom saw Europeans climbing in soft shells this spring.

 

Maybe once the manufacturers make them in other colours besides black...them euros like their colours, well at least red!!!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Europeans were first to introduce softshell pants and hardshell top combination. Now they reversed items, and wear hardshell pants and softshell tops.

 

When they will make up their mind? Or looks like they have a difficulties organizing their drawer. Need help to match clothes on the hanger? Jeezzz! :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most definetly will layer the clothing for sure. I appriciate everyones input I think I am going to go for those NWalpine pants as see what they can do for me. Thanks everyone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe once the manufacturers make them in other colours besides black...them euros like their colours, well at least red!!!

 

 

One would think! Colors are way toned down in Chamonix these days compared to the '80s. While they have had soft shell pants since the mid 70s most I saw climbing now were in black hard shells with a good coating of silver duct tape....even guides!

 

Totally unacceptable as a fashion statement at on time :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Most definetly will layer the clothing for sure. I appriciate everyones input I think I am going to go for those NWalpine pants as see what they can do for me. Thanks everyone

 

If you think about it, let us know what you think. I'm pretty interested in them, especially after seeing Dane's clever grommet-in-the-pant-gator that could easily be custom made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got the NW Alpine pants, they already have the grommet in the ankle so are ready to roll. I've been using them as ski pants, and the only negative I've had is when the ankle is unsnapped for a while the snap packs full of snow and I have to spend about 2 seconds picking it out. Ohh the bother. They defiantly have a tighter fit, which I like. Doesn't look as steezy for skiing, but fuck it. Bill with NW Alpine was super helpful in getting them shipped to me and I've had some of the best customer service ever from NW Alpine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Europeans were first to introduce softshell pants and hardshell top combination. Now they reversed items, and wear hardshell pants and softshell tops.

 

:-)

 

Yes indeed.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My goto alpine pant is a pair of OR Credo [ur]http://www.backcountry.com/outdoor-research-credo-softshell-pant-mens[/url].

 

If the weather's threatening, I carry a pair of MEC goretex pants (bought on sale, never seen again), that DON'T have a powder-cuff and DO have a 3/4s zipper that I can fit a crampon-ed boot through.

 

I'll add long underwear if and only if the temps are in the low 20s or less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×