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keenwesh

boot question

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I've got a pair of Garmont Tower GTX's for ice climbing and the like. they're great in the cascades because they're light and warm enough, my question is, will they be too cold for ice climbing in bozeman? also they do not have toe welts so I have to get clip crampons for them (I'm about to purchase a set of cyborgs...) Is it worth it to pick up a pair of Baruntse's for the extra warmth and toe welt? I'll be going to patagonia next winter (I think the garmonts should be alright there) but I'm worried about the cold temps in bozeman and I'd like to eventually do some trips to Alaska, where I'll need a pair of warm boots. thoughts?

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oh, and I've got size 15 feet, so that severely restricts my options as far as different boots available to me

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you will definitely need warmer that tower boots for AK. Depending on season and location, but classic routes in usual times are too cold for towers, unless you are going to little swiss.

 

You would need plastic or nylon toe piece for your crampon (for towers) which is fine unless you are going for super rad ice and mixed lines in hyalite. This type of crampon would be good for AK though.

 

I think that hyalite can be pleasant for down right frigid. All depends on luck wether your towers would be good or not. If you go with the towers, it will be to cold according to Murphy.

Edited by genepires

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I need a boot with a toe welt, I want to get into mixed and hard ice. are the Baruntse's the way to go? I don't think I can pony up the dough for those and they seem to be overkill for my current needs...

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My two cents if you like - I stay pretty warm so take it with a grain of salt...

I have three pairs of boots. One pair for warm temps similar to yours (Trangos Evos), one for basically all of my waterfall climbing (Nepals), and one for frigid temps and alpine (Spantiks). Yes, Sportivas do fit me well. :) I have always been fine in my Nepals down to -35C, the caveat being that I get to sleep somewhere warm and dry them out; over the years they have logged the most miles by far. If I were you I would grab a Nepal or equivalent and worry about AK when that happens. Myself, I would not try to get a crossover boot between nasty cold multi-day and technical, I would buy the correct one for your needs now and do the same later so that they perform for what you need. If you plan to do a lot of steep ice and mixed you will want a toe welt I think. My Nepals are going on 8 years of climbing, probably worth the investment.

good luck :)

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Many climbs in the alaska range can be done with nepal evo and add insulated overboots for when it is real cold. Nepal evo is a good ice boot also. I don't know if I would call it a mixed boot though but it would still work.

 

Maybe you need to explain what your AK and patagonia aspirations are.

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the nepal evo, what about the extreme? In mountaineering boots I like to go slightly bigger because if theres not enough room in my boots my feet get cold and I get more blisters... they say they make size 49 and 50 by request for the nepal extreme.

 

My patagonian aspirations? I'd like to get up Exocet, Marc is gunning for the west face of cerro torre but thats a little bold for me to declare. Canadian route or supercatalena on Fitz Roy. Poincenot.

In AK I'd like to eventually do the Cassin

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Hey gene & matt, what about multi-day trips with the nepal evo's... What's the drying out experience been like?

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Buy used. Look around all year and maybe something will turn up. If you are moving to bozeman you can be picky and stay at home when it's really cold. I climbed about 20-25 days there a couple of years ago and don't remember going out on any really cold days because my partners were locals and wanted to stay inside and drink when it got cold. Cold nights and warmer days is pretty normal. You could also get some cheap used plastics to use on really cold days, and just plan on not climbing super hard (though learning to climb hard in plastics will make you a better climber when you finally get nice boots).

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I own the extreme and not the evo. I was not aware that they still made the extreme. My extremes were good for alaska range but we didn't on denali. For the cassin, you are going to need the best boot money can buy. You will be commited and doing it in less than perfect boots is a very bad idea if you love your toes. Nepals are good for things like moose tooth, francis, huntington, ect.

 

My nepals are sized a bit bigger and still climb ice well. It is all about the cuff to lock the foot in place. Roomy toe box counts. Fit is a personal thing though so you will have to try on different ones which will be hard due to your snowshoe feet.

 

calehoopes. I only used them multiday in AK and they were fine drying out. But the air is so dry that it is real easy to dry things out. My multiday experience in cascades with leathers is that they are difficult to dry unless you are at a sunny camp and not wearing the boots. take the insoles out to dry separately.

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About the multi-day with Nepals - I have done it but probably won't much now that I have an option. Like Gene says, it depends on what you're doing, but if they get good and wet then they do take quite a lot to dry out.

I was talking to a guy last night about his Baturas, he really liked them. Said they were lighter and climbed better than Nepals, and I would be inclined to trust his judgement. Probably stay drier as well, at least from the outside. Pricier, though.

The Spantiks I have found really easy to dry, and it has been really well appreciated recently.

 

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Thanks for the replies! Maybe I'll check out the Spantik's then - even though they are pricey. Anyone had a good experience in the Spantik's in AK on Denali?

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When your reday to buy the Spantiks, Google them and see what price you can find. I found some for 450 and a local store did a price match. I had them in hand the same day

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My wife has a pair of Baruntses and really likes them. We haven't been out on super cold days - but they appear to be as warm or warmer than my Invernos.

 

As for leather boots in the AK Range - I wouldn't recommend them. If all goes to plan and you're back in your tent within 20 hours they'd be fine - but too often things do not go to plan. Likewise double boots allow you to pull the liner out and place them in your bag to aid in drying them.

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how do the baruntse's climb? I like that they're a double boot so I can curl up with the liners at night and dry them out, and I really like that they make them up to size 16. is there a marked difference in their performance compared to the nepals?

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>how do the baruntse's climb?

 

better than 99.9% of the people climbing in them :)

 

>is there a marked difference in their performance compared to the nepals?

 

dude...it is a dbl boot. Of course there is marked difference.

Dbls are way better on endurance ice and most pure, technical ice, They aren't much worse on anything hard, desperate and thin. They are clunky. All dbls are. The 6000 being the least so. But if you can climb hard desperate and thin in temps you need a dbl boot it aint going to matter to you.

 

The Baruntse is best described as a Nepal in dbl boot form. It climbs technical ground better than the Spantik, not as good as the Scarpa 6000 and is likely as warm or warmer than either. I know the Baruntse design is more reliable than either.

 

La Sportiva likely sells three pair of Spantiks for every one pair of Baruntse's...and THAT is silly! Buy the Baruntse of sale and save yourself some hazzles and get a better liner.

 

Few knowledgable climbers take a single boot to Alaska or a leather boot for that matter. Most use a single boot in Patagonia during their summer (our winter) season. There are a few exceptions. Take a look at Colin's Haley's or Jon Griffith's blog for some insight there.

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Dane, thank you for your EXCELLENT EXCELLENT reviews. I ended up purchasing a pair of Baruntse's based on these comments and your blog reviews. I think this might be the best choice for someone who's going to do a lot of mountaineering with a bit of alpine ice/water ice thrown in. Really looking forward to trying these out in Ouray too. And for me, it's not a big change - I did most of my days in Ouray on Koflach Degre's. I'm really looking forward to getting em and fitting them up. I also learned that the return policy at backcountry.com basically MATCHES REI's (return if not 100% satisfied). Therefore, I picked a size (1/2 size up from my street shoe) and I'll start with that.

 

Also, nice blog on the heat molding. However, I'm gonna have to see how the boots fit without them since I only went a half size up. Oh well, if I have to go back to get a bigger size, that should be no big deal.

 

Thanks for the recommendations.

Edited by CaleHoopes

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Thanks Cale. No matter what size you got, it is worth taking them into Sturtavants in Bellevue and having them molded. It make a world of difference for the better. Awesome boot.

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I need your wisdom once more dane.

I figured out that the Batura's fit me in size 48. super comfy! really like the integrated gaiter. I know they'll be great doing daytrips iceclimbing in bozeman and be warm in patagonia, but would they hold up in somewhere like little switzerland or on Huntington? the smaller (but by no means less difficult) peaks in the AK range. They kept me feet plenty toasty inside my house here at sea level in Olympia, but that obviously doesn't mean shit.

 

ps do they climb better than the nepals?

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I'm reading your blog right now and realized you've already put up a very good and comprehensive review of the batura. sounds like you dig them, I realized though that the boot I tried on is the first gen boot

is there a fit difference between this and the new boot?

Edited by keenwesh

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Earlier on this thread I asked about boot opinions. So far so interesting.

 

I bought a pair of Baruntse boots. Size 42. Then did 16.5 hours of snowshoeing, bushwhacking, creek crossings, etc. with no fitting and the stock footbeds.

 

All was not right with the world. I didn't get a blister but got many hot spots (probably just not broken in). However, my biggest problem was that the boot was pressing in on my 5th metatarsal on both feet. Ugh.

 

Therefore, I've purchased a pair of 42.5's and took them to Rick @ Sturtevants. The first thing he did was look at my feet in the boot without the liners. He took the boots back and made them WIDER! So, that was huge. Then custom footbeds and heat molded everything. The whole thing took 45 minutes and I definitely could tell the difference when he had me walk the boots for 10 minutes around the store.

 

I'm very happy with the custom fitting at the moment and they will get a big test in the mountains this weekend.

 

Anyway, I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks for all the help Dane!

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