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jrex

[TR] Mt. St. Helens Summit - Winter Route 1/4/2011

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Trip: Mt. St. Helens Summit - Winter Route

 

Date: 1/4/2011

 

Trip Report:

A couple weeks ago I posted a trip where I made it to 6200 on Helens only to feel like I was in over my head...I hit the slopes a few times to polish my technique and build some confidence and Sunday went for it. Snow conditions were full spectrum, everything from deep powder to hard ice. I am just glad I lived to tell the tale. Not bad for my second month of skiing. I can't wait to figure out how to connect my turns better...

 

Mt_St_Helens_Winter_Summit_011.jpg

 

Mt_St_Helens_Winter_Summit_013.jpg

 

Mt_St_Helens_Winter_Summit_027.jpg

 

Mt_St_Helens_Winter_Summit_004.jpg

 

Mt_St_Helens_Winter_Summit_006.jpg

 

Gear Notes:

AT setup, next time get some ski crampons

 

Approach Notes:

Go up

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Hey good job. St Helens is a nice ski, typically more so in the spring when you get good CORN. Hard to beat the views etc. Backcountry skiing is a very very different animal than lift-served skiing, good on you for perservering through.

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Great pics! I highly recommend spending some time on the lifts and invest in at least one lesson. I tried teaching myself to ski and not only did it suck but you are more prone to injure yourself--DAMHIK.

 

Keep up the nice work!

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Yep, lifts help you get lots of downhill time, and some ski lessons help too.

 

BC skiing is better with good technique, and ski areas can help you there. The ski areas do lack the funky conditions you will encounter away from the lifts. Maybe to start spend 80 percent of your time skiing areas and the remaining 20 percent in the BC. As you progress try to reduce time at the area.

 

I like the photos!

 

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I am planning on getting a spring pass to Meadows. I am totally hooked on skiing. I summited Mt. Rainer last spring and on the way down watched skier after skier cruise by while I post holed all the way back to the car....I said to myself then "I will learn to do that" Now I am on my way. Thanks for the advice

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I am headed up there on Monday, if anyone is up there between now and then I would love to hear what the snow pack is looking like after the dumpage we are supposed to be getting.

 

Ballzy heading up there after so little skiing. Way to go after it and as most of them said, stay safe.

 

I noticed in your gear notes you thought you should get ski crampons... I have found the 'pons for you boots are much more useful, imo. If I can't make the switchbacks happen and just want to go up, ski crampons won't do that for you as well as taking off the skis and slapping on some 'pons will. I personally can't warrant having a piece of gear that tailored to one thing when I can get something else that does the job and more. Again, this is just my opinion and I don't have the experience that others around here do, thats for sure.

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Adam,

 

Ski 'pons rock and will save you a lot of time on something like St. Helens with variable conditions.

 

JRex - love the photos man. Way to go after two months. To perfect your technique, I would recommend skinning up the climber's trail on hood and skiing down that a lot. Keep it up!

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I am planning on getting a spring pass to Meadows.

No question that Meadows has better terrain, but they normally close mid April to early May due to lack of snow. A Timberline spring pass costs the same and is good through the end of May with ample snow guaranteed.

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I have found the 'pons for you boots are much more useful, imo. If I can't make the switchbacks happen and just want to go up, ski crampons won't do that for you as well as taking off the skis and slapping on some 'pons will.

I agree, especially if you don't need to break trail. In spring and summer when you are on hard snow early in the day and don't need floatation to break trail, I prefer to take weight off my feet and put it on my back until time to ride down. Thus crampons on the boots and skis on my back for the upward journey. If the climb up is not steep (i.e. south side Adams or Hood) then I also put my ski boots on my back and use a lightweight pair of hiking boots with crampons. Moving weight from your feet to your back makes the uphill journey easier.

Edited by pcg

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Thanks for the Hood spring pass tip. I mentioned ski crampons because while me and a couple other people were slipping and sliding on some icy sections 2 dudes with pons smiled and waved as they blasted past. 2 hours later they were on the summit while we where a 1000 feet below. F'n gear can't get enough of it.

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Moving weight from your feet to your back makes the uphill journey easier.

 

My experience is vastly different. So much easier for me, and faster, to skin up rather than carrying my skis and boots.

 

YMMV

 

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20+ feet, I climbed around the rim to the west then zoomed in to avoid the ground in the shot. Nice effect, almost like I was standing on a big azz cornice:)

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20+ feet, I climbed around the rim to the west then zoomed in to avoid the ground in the shot. Nice effect, almost like I was standing on a big azz cornice:)

 

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