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corvallisclimb

Oregon Climbing History

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Hey Shapp,

I'd be real interested to find out about Baby Rock and any other of the outcroppings near there. I went up to Monteith Rock with a friend just yesterday to scout it. Monteith maybe climbable but probably not protectable...real crumbly. I'm not a geologiest but looked like falling apart sedimentary. We then made a lame try to get to Baby Rock on FSR 328 but it was getting darkish and we didn't make it. some of those outcroppings look columnar from 58.

Anybody?

G

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DSCF2476.JPG

 

Hand made Dean Fry angle. Made in the Corvallis High School shop. Circa 1970.

 

Thanks to Jeff Thomas for hooking me up with this peice. Too cool!

 

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At Springfield High School machine shop in Oregon, I built a fully operational 19th century model naval canon that has a 50 caliber bore and have shot it several times. They don't teach that anymore.

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At Springfield High School machine shop in Oregon, I built a fully operational 19th century model naval canon that has a 50 caliber bore and have shot it several times. They don't teach that anymore.

the next zombie apocalypse will mend that trend i'll wager :)

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all of this is excalibur-equivalent gear compared to the goddamn tent stake on The Turkey! :lmao:

turkey.jpg

anythign w/ a wingnut is good too! :)

turkey4.jpg

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here's more hist(e?)orical mank from the monster :)

 

IMG_5069-224x300.jpg

 

IMG_5068-300x224.jpg

 

IMG_5071-224x300.jpg

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& some shit from steins

this first one might be Don Baars' original 1950's rawl 5 pice

 

DSCN7909-212x300.jpg

 

DSCN7939-300x224.jpg

 

DSCN7940-300x224.jpg

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biiiig hanger for ben stein's knob

steins8.JPG

 

2 shitty pins in an old hole better than 1 :)

steins92.JPG

 

 

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Some notes to back up the pictures...

 

The tent stakes where from the original ascent. It amazing how they are still there and suprisingly solid all things considered.

 

On the first ascent of Steins Pillar, the FAist pulled most of their homemade hangers from the philips shells. So when Fred Becky, and I think Eric Bjornstad and who else I cant remember came for the second ascent, they found this out. So the drove back to Prineville and bought half inch lead strips about half a cm thick. They wrapped this around various pitons to the right thickness and hammered them in to the holes. Bomber, hence all the crap. I'm thinking I'm going to give Steins a solid clean up job in a month or two.

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Why clean the route of such history?? I found the route plenty safe and seeing these classic relics makes it quite fun, not generic and dumbed down..

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Why clean the route of such history?? I found the route plenty safe and seeing these classic relics makes it quite fun, not generic and dumbed down..

that's the impression i got last fall as well - there are enough new bolts to keep you from taking a bad fall if one of the relics you're using chooses to fail, and certainly the funky old stuff serves as a vertical musuem :)

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Why clean the route of such history?? I found the route plenty safe and seeing these classic relics makes it quite fun, not generic and dumbed down..

that's the impression i got last fall as well - there are enough new bolts to keep you from taking a bad fall if one of the relics you're using chooses to fail, and certainly the funky old stuff serves as a vertical musuem :)

 

Easy to leave some junk for the history, but people keep pounding more metal into that thing so they can free climb it, and I think that its more of a mess than anything. Would be nice to see it cleaned up a bit.

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saw that this week's oregon field guide (opb) will feature a segment with Jeff Thomas & the Mazamas archive = OR climbing history bit.

 

or field guide episode

 

Video not available. Hope it is sometime. That guy paid his dues to history tfs

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It is free climb-able at a relatively moderate standard. Jeff Thomas and crew added and/or replaced just enough bolts to make it safe when the FFA was made(1979). Other than anchors and upgrading those original free climbing bolts why not leave well enough alone?

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It is free climb-able at a relatively moderate standard. Jeff Thomas and crew added and/or replaced just enough bolts to make it safe when the FFA was made(1979). Other than anchors and upgrading those original free climbing bolts why not leave well enough alone?

 

I climbed it twice last year and each time there were different pitons in the same spot (new ones) obviously people try and pull the pins they think are booty, instead they are placed for free climbing. Why not put bolts????

 

It's not like he is talking about filling in all the old Angle holes but cleaning up some of that junk that could get someone hurt is a good idea.

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It is free climb-able at a relatively moderate standard. Jeff Thomas and crew added and/or replaced just enough bolts to make it safe when the FFA was made(1979). Other than anchors and upgrading those original free climbing bolts why not leave well enough alone?

 

 

Ummm Craggyman- I appricate your concern for historys sake, but thats about as far as your argument makes it. As I stated before the FA party pulled all of there hangers, the only original things are the empty shells, wich led to the addition of many more useless bolts. The only history your seeing are those bolts added by other later parties because the FA party did not use the proper hardware. Its great that your okay with free climbing on the old shitty hardware, but that route is not getting freed at all any more because that crap only gets older and people only get wiser. Saying that replacing the bolts is "dumbing the route" down is asinine. Next time I dumb a route down I'll make sure and let you know.

 

 

 

Edit: Also this thread is about climbing history, not about the ethics of replacing old hardware. If you want to question my actions please do it via PM.

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Some more desert craggin pics from out in the Ochocos....

 

Jim_Nieland_summit_Lower_Twin_Pillar_1967.jpg

Jim Nieland on top of the Lower Twin Pillar during the FA. 1967.

Photo by Eugene Dodd, courtesy of Jim Nieland.

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