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jon

13 Year Old Attempts Everest

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For what it is worth, I haven't been bitching at all and sprayers kidding.... really? Ok.... I can do kidding... When is kidding and tearing one down about a huge life long dream and accomplishment at someone else's expense a constructive, positive, and worth while endeavor that adds value to this world?

 

$30-50K is a big deal to anyone however, the fact is, in the big picture it is NOT a lot of money.

 

I appreciate your ideas as they are goods ones. I did a climb & trek two years ago and raised $10,000 for cancer research which I gave to Fred Hutchinson as a promise to my mom who died of lung cancer as she stared out the window at Mt. Rainier from her hospital bed. In addition, I did just pledge to donate thru Word of Life Ministries the entire $25,000 that they need to build an orphanage in African village (www.wolm.net) and I'm personally fund raising $100k for another 8k climb as a cancer donation to FH as well as committed to a cause to help another climber raise $1m for Alzheimer's Cure Fund.

 

We all can help in whatever means that we have been blessed, How about you? You can donate here: www.wolm.net or here:

https://app.etapestry.com/hosted/AlzheimersDiseaseResearchF/OnlineDonation.html

 

Real people? Real people.... help real people be the best they can and do not condemn, belittle or criticize others who are doing more than they themselves do.....

Edited by ASmith

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Remember when Everest was the *culmination" of decades of climbing experience? Now it's just a stunt. A long, physically challenging stunt, but a one-off stunt all the same. Any sane parent would say, "Gee that's nice, it's important to have dreams at your age." Not buying the little prince a plane ticket....
reading about historical everest expeditions and then reading about and watching on the tube how expeditions have become is exactly the reason i stand behind what i posted earlier... i'm glad i'm not the only one who sees it this way. i was just looking for a more gentle way of putting it...

 

 

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"Any sane parent would say, "Gee that's nice, it's important to have dreams at your age." Not buying the little prince a plane ticket....

 

Really, maybe if there were more parents that took their job of being a parent more seriously and really took on the full responsibility of what they applied for when they had their children by helping them reach for the stars and accomplish great things instead of sending them to baby sitters, expecting schools to raise them, and surrounding them with negative, cynical, small thinking people, the world would be a better place. Is it all about exposure.

 

This just in; 7 year old raises $8500 for Alzheimers. What have you done recently?

 

www.tonic.com/article/7-year-old-raises-8500-dollars-for-alzheimers-research-through-comics/

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Not to knock the kid, but didnt a 12 year old sherpa make the summit on a whim just a few months ago?

 

T

 

No, the youngest climber to scale Everest had been Temba Tsheri of Nepal, who reached the peak at age 16.

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ASmith: :tup::rawk:

 

Thanks for your words. Much needed with the many naysayers on this thread and site, which, interestingly, I don't think are as bad as the general populace--as evidenced by most comments posted on the net.

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Nothing wrong with the kid climbing Everest or his parents supporting him in the endeavor. That said, being a working-class bloke, I'm a Josh Lewis fan. Gotta love his style. Not likely to see his name in the headlines though.

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Really, maybe if there were more parents that took their job of being a parent more seriously and really took on the full responsibility of what they applied for when they had their children by helping them reach for the stars and accomplish great things instead of sending them to baby sitters, expecting schools to raise them, and surrounding them with negative, cynical, small thinking people, the world would be a better place. Is it all about exposure.

i sense a good bit of logic in what you are saying, smithy, which is why i won't join the other sprayers in being absolutely outspoken towards this whole thing. but since you brought up the parents and helping their kids reach for and achieve their dreams let me add something else for you to think about.

 

in the early 1980's (and i hate aging myself this way, but it seems necessary) as a youngster i used to watch oregon public broadcasting every saturday because it sometimes would feature adventurous topics. sometimes it was space travel, other times it was modern-day cowboys(ranchers) riding the open range for months during the summers. i also remember a few deep sea fishing programs that would put deadliest catch to shame, and any program concerning jungle exploration (or any kind of exploration for that matter) would completely mesmerize me. then there were the adventure sports like skydiving and climbing.

 

one saturday afternoon in the spring i remember walking into my living room and flipping on the tv only to discover that the subject of that day's program was a fellow named john bachar, who was doing this extreme type of rock climbing called free-soloing. i didn't know what this was at the time and i didn't understand why he was doing it. and watching it longer and longer my only question at the time was, "what the heck is it that he keeps reaching into that bag for that is tied around his waist?" i was totally glued to the tv for those moments watching JB climb smoothly and effortlessly up the rock, and in the next few moments my mother came into the room. upon seeing what i was watching she changed the channel and told me that i could watch another channel. it was clear - after many years - that climbing was something that my mother would never have supported me doing. it took my going to college and getting bored with studying for midterms that spurred my interest in mountaineering. after our neighbor was killed on mt hood during the OES tragedy in 1986 (several years after i saw that clip of JB) it was clear that my mother would never - while i was under her roof - encourage me to take part in adventure sports.

 

my parents never encouraged me to climb, but they always believed that i could do anything that i wanted to do. my mother, always the authoritarian, believed that if she gave me the guidance to make informed, educated decisions that i would go on to be successful in whatever it is that i chose to take part. ultimately i chose to rock climb, which led me to want to climb mt hood and the other cascades, and now i attempt such endeavors not because my parents guided my dreams (because those dreams didn't fully exist when i was a boy) but because my parents taught me to think and evaluate that with which i was presented.

 

my mother took her job as a parent very seriously and she never approved of the risky, dangerous adventures - and still doesn't. when she asked me after my recent accident if it all was worth it i told her "absolutely." her response was, "well i guess you thought it all through then and weighed the consequences." when she and i recently spoke of that day when she turned off the tv while i was watching the late JB free-solo, i told her that i met JB and told him the same story (he laughed). she didn't know what to say.

 

parents don't have to encourage their kids to climb for them to want to do it and if they do there is no guarantee that the kid will want to continue to climb. i've worked at a climbing gym in the past with kids aged 6-10, teaching them the basics of movement in climbing and some parents were there coaching their kids along side of me. others just brought their unexcited kids in and dropped them off, expecting them to get excited without them. you can't pump up a kid that doesn't want to get pumped up.

 

my point (finally) is just that parents - like you are alluding to - make all the difference in what their kids do and get excited in doing. it is remarkable that jordan is doing what he is doing with the encouragement and support of his parents. if it was me and my parents i'd be at a baseball game. :)

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I'm a Josh Lewis fan. Gotta love his style. Not likely to see his name in the headlines though.

 

yeah, me too, he is in the headlines at CC

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$30k to climb Everest is NOT very much in the big scope of things. $30-$50k barely even buys a car these days...

 

You're clearly out of touch. What kind of car do you think, the average guy is buying? A late model BMW convertible with a groovin' sound system?

 

Rich? His dad is a helicopter pilot. They make 60-80K a year, not an amount that most would consider rich. I couldn't support my family with much, on double that, and neither will you so...

 

Are you kidding me? Really??? You couldn't support your family on that much (or even double that?) and neither could I? Easily done, blue-blood, for even less, and with style and comfort. Smart folks adapt to their means.

 

But as for the kid.....if my parents wanted to facilitate a nice little adventure up Everest when I was 13, I'd go for it....but I'd need some heavy professional supervision, as this guy no doubt did. Stunt? Sure! Would you have done it if offered to you when you were 13? Sho nuff!

 

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A thought that has served me well over the years:

 

The poorest way to face life is to face it with a sneer. There are many men who feel a kind of twister pride in cynicism; there are many who confine themselves to criticism of the way others do what they themselves dare not even attempt. There is no more unhealthy being, no man less worthy of respect, than he who either really holds, or feigns to hold, an attitude of sneering disbelief toward all that is great and lofty, whether in achievement or in that noble effort which, even if it fails, comes to second achievement. A cynical habit of thought and speech, a readiness to criticise work which the critic himself never tries to perform, an intellectual aloofness which will not accept contact with life's realities - all these are marks, not as the possessor would fain to think, of superiority but of weakness. They mark the men unfit to bear their part painfully in the stern strife of living, who seek, in the affection of contempt for the achievements of others, to hide from others and from themselves in their own weakness. The rôle is easy; there is none easier, save only the rôle of the man who sneers alike at both criticism and performance.

 

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

 

Dude...if you're going to quote the great Teddy Roosevelt, give the man his credit lest others attribute his wisdom to you. In fact, here's a link with the whole essay:

 

The Art of Manliness:Teddy Roosevelt: "Citizenship in a Republic"

 

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"my parents never encouraged me to climb, but they always believed that i could do anything that i wanted to do. my mother, always the authoritarian, believed that if she gave me the guidance to make informed, educated decisions that i would go on to be successful in whatever it is that i chose to take part. ultimately i chose to rock climb, which led me to want to climb mt hood and the other cascades, and now i attempt such endeavors not because my parents guided my dreams (because those dreams didn't fully exist when i was a boy) but because my parents taught me to think and evaluate that with which i was presented.

 

my mother took her job as a parent very seriously and she never approved of the risky, dangerous adventures - and still doesn't. when she asked me after my recent accident if it all was worth it i told her "absolutely." her response was, "well i guess you thought it all through then and weighed the consequences." when she and i recently spoke of that day when she turned off the tv while i was watching the late JB free-solo, i told her that i met JB and told him the same story (he laughed). she didn't know what to say.

 

parents don't have to encourage their kids to climb for them to want to do it and if they do there is no guarantee that the kid will want to continue to climb. i've worked at a climbing gym in the past with kids aged 6-10, teaching them the basics of movement in climbing and some parents were there coaching their kids along side of me. others just brought their unexcited kids in and dropped them off, expecting them to get excited without them. you can't pump up a kid that doesn't want to get pumped up.

 

my point (finally) is just that parents - like you are alluding to - make all the difference in what their kids do and get excited in doing. it is remarkable that jordan is doing what he is doing with the encouragement and support of his parents. if it was me and my parents i'd be at a baseball game. :)"

 

Sounds to me you were extremely blessed. Our parents must have went to the same school! When I had my son my wife and promised him, in his crib, and ourself's that we would improve on providing him everything that we had been blessed with as children and would eliminate those things that I wished would have been different for myself so as not to continue the chain.

 

I woke up this morning with a message to remind myself of the truth of the universal law that always proves true of what we receive in life, will be in the exact proportion, what we do in the way of providing value for others... meaning all we have to do to get more of anything we want is to help more people get what they want......

Edited by ASmith

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Easily done, blue-blood, for even less, and with style and comfort. Smart folks adapt to their means."

 

So you are already condemning yourself with complacency and planning a life of mediocracy when you can do and have anything you want? Smart folks don't think, talk, and accept small when all it takes is an proper perspective, attitude, and effort to go big!

Edited by ASmith

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"So you are already condemning yourself with complacency and planning a life of mediocracy when you can do and have anything you want?

 

So, not aspiring to a rich and extravagant life, living within your means, equals "complacency" and "mediocracy(sic)"? If you want to leave a small footprint on this earth and can get by and enjoy your existence without abundant resources, you're a loser?

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ASmith, I'm not totally sure what you are arguing here. I don't think anyone is claiming that he shouldn't be allowed to climb Everest. What they (and I now) are doing is questioning the media's priorities when reporting "climbing news". Gimmicks such as this - "Youngest ----- up Everest!", "First -insert gender/race/nationality/age combination- up Everest!" - get headlines in the mainstream media because they have this fixation on Everest being the highest. While truly impressive accomplishments don't even merit a peep.

 

A few weeks ago two Japanese climbers made the first ascent of the Southeast Face of Mount Logan, until then one of the greatest unclimbed walls in the world, without so much as a word of their ascent other than on some of the specialist climbing media websites. Surely that deserves more attention and praise than being guided up the donkey route on Everest while sucking O2 from 7k.

 

The other thing that seems strange is whenever anyone criticizes the attention being paid to this, they are accused of jealously. But for anyone to be jealous, they would have to actually want to spend 50 grand to climb Everest. I can tell you right now that if I had 50 grand to devote to climbing, I'd get a lot more great trips out of it than a high-altitude snow slog.

Edited by Julian

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"

So, not aspiring to a rich and extravagant life, living within your means, equals "complacency" and "mediocracy(sic)"? If you want to leave a small footprint on this earth and can get by and enjoy your existence without abundant resources, you're a loser?

 

Thats what is so great about living you can choose to do with our time what we want and be whatever we want? Although I have to admit, I fail to see why anyone would want to live a life of complacency and mediocracy when one can, with little effort, do so much more. Why choose to have a life not fully experienced or of little insignificance or to simply exist? Ah yes... your choice. Done

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"

So, not aspiring to a rich and extravagant life, living within your means, equals "complacency" and "mediocracy(sic)"? If you want to leave a small footprint on this earth and can get by and enjoy your existence without abundant resources, you're a loser?

 

Thats what is so great about living you can choose to do with our time what we want and be whatever we want? Although I have to admit, I fail to see why anyone would want to live a life of complacency and mediocracy when one can, with little effort, do so much more. Why choose to have a life not fully experienced or of little insignificance or to simply exist? Ah yes... your choice. Done

 

Thats a pretty big philosophical question there. Lets take my step father for example. Here's a man thats chosen to settle down at a young age and work the same job since he was 17 as a diesel mechanic. He pulls on average 14 hour days 6 days a week. I wish I was exaggerating here. Thats his life. On Sunday, his day off, he comes home mows his lawn and washes his own log trucks. It's rough, but he loves it! On top of that he's helped my mother raise a family of two and not once have we gone a night with out dinner. He personally hates taking time off to go on vacations. Needless to say here, this is a man thats content with life. Always packs a smile and has been an encouraging factor when MYSELF wanted to go out and do my own thing (climb mt's, move to another country, ect ect). Everyone digs their own thing. Why do we have to belittle those that don't strive to earn millions and stand on the tallest peaks? Whats wrong with planting your roots and watching your seeds grow? Just sayin'

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I'd rather climb Kinga! Does she count, I mean, I'm dreaming for it!
Back off, aussie! Kinga's mine. Well, at least I'm working it. Your studliness and youth may prevail, though, but be aware that I'm not cockblocked yet! :)

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I'd rather climb Kinga! Does she count, I mean, I'm dreaming for it!
Back off, aussie! Kinga's mine. Well, at least I'm working it. Your studliness and youth may prevail, though, but be aware that I'm not cockblocked yet! :)
Watch it, sobo, those polish chicks can be just as BSC as the red-headed irish ones. DAMHIK.

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So you are already condemning yourself with complacency and planning a life of mediocracy when you can do and have anything you want? Smart folks don't think, talk, and accept small when all it takes is an proper perspective, attitude, and effort to go big!

 

First of all "mediocracy" usually refers to an institution, not an individual ("government or rule by a mediocre person or group" - Random House) so I assume you meant "mediocrity". By the way....the notion that you can be, do, or have anything you want is nonsense....otherwise there would be 10 million astronauts, 20 million "rock stars" and 50 million cowboys. Society can't sustain that....it requires a massive infrastructure of your so-called mediocre people to support the relatively few cowboys, astronauts, etc.

 

Secondly, you have know idea whom you might be addressing on this site....I'm sure there are many folks here with far more money than you and plenty more who are very successful and content with a lot less. That being said, I've got a new career for you to consider (if you don't mind joining 3,000 or so other "special" people):

 

Hire a professional Everest motivational speaker!

 

Get your BIG STOKE for only $1,000 - $20,000!

 

MAKES ME WANNAGETONOUTTHAR! :rolleyes:

 

MattFoleyChrisFarley.jpg

 

 

 

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There are people who have traveled farther than the rest of us, never going far from home and there are many who have traveled and had "adventures" the world over without escaping from their own heads. You are right about one thing, Mr. Smith: You "fail to see."

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I'd rather climb Kinga! Does she count, I mean, I'm dreaming for it!
Back off, aussie! Kinga's mine. Well, at least I'm working it. Your studliness and youth may prevail, though, but be aware that I'm not cockblocked yet! :)
Watch it, sobo, those polish chicks can be just as BSC as the red-headed irish ones. DAMHIK.
BSC??? Bed Side Commode?? DAMHIK...

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I got the DAMHIK bit. Wasn't too sure on the BSC bit.

I was coming up with something unfit to print, even on this site... :whistle:

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