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CraigA

Learning trad

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For $150 a day, you better be AMGA certified or something.

 

I'll teach ya for $125. I've been climbing for 15 years, have climbed 5.12 trad, 5.14 sport, and V10 boulder. If you're interested. PM me.

 

MTWS: The militia is out to get me. Gotta lay low.

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I haven't climbed much in this area. It's great to get some name/locations of good routes. Where the easiest and closest trad routes to Tacoma/Seattle? I'm just getting back to it after taking several eons off.

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Aid climb. Nothing like a good old fashioned bounce test to let you know if your gear is placed well.

 

Beacon has some killer beginner routes. I've done some solo aid at Broughtons as well.

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I agree that aid climbing is the best way to really learn how to place protection well, especialy difficult placements.

 

But I don't think that it is the best way to learn how to Trad Climb on free routes. Mostly because you will will want to place a piece every 5ft and you will want to pull on the gear all the time! [geek] At least thats what happenss to me after every long aid climb I do... [laf][big Drink]

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I agree with Lambone that the best way to learn to trad climb is to climb trad routes. But the initial post asked about learning to place gear. Aid climbing involves a lot of time spent placing gear and testing it, for sure. But leading a lot of trad climbs will offer opportunities to learn to hang from one hand while fiddling with gear and worrying about a fall and maybe not knowing where the route is going to go next.

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Then again, most beggining trad climbers won't have a large enough rack for aid climbing, or all the other accesories...

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Or rather, how NOT to trad climb. Great movies, actually, you have good taste. [laf][laf] Oh, and what about Cliffhanger? Damn, I wish I was as good as Stallone. Well, back to the gym for some weight training.

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I'll add my support for John Long's Climbing Anchors.

 

Can anyone recomend a text for learning aid beyond that of FOTH?

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quote:

Originally posted by b-rock:

I'll add my support for John Long's Climbing Anchors.

 

Can anyone recomend a text for learning aid beyond that of FOTH?

John Long's MORE Climbing Anchors? [Confused][laf][laf]

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quote:

Originally posted by b-rock:

I'll add my support for John Long's Climbing Anchors.

 

Can anyone recomend a text for learning aid beyond that of FOTH?

John Long also wrote a book with Minnendorf called "Big Walls." It takes you through the basics, but that's all. Mike Corbet also wrote a book, I believe called "Aid Climbing" I didn't like that one as much. Both books are ok, but they don't go into some of the newer equipment and time saving techniques.

 

Then there is also Chongo's elusive 1000 page wall climber's bible. I don't know the title, probably something about Big Wall Metaphysics or something...It costs $80, but I have actualy heard that it is worth it.

 

I think it's distributed out of the Camp 4 parking lot, or the Lodge cafeteria.

 

Or you can persuade me to teach you...

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