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CraigA

Learning trad

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So what's the name of a good book that you would recommend for learning to place trad gear?

 

Thanks,

 

Craig

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quote:

Originally posted by CraigA:

So what's the name of a good book that you would recommend for learning to place trad gear?

 

Thanks,

 

Craig

Drive right past the library and head to Leavenworth where you'll find an (open) book called Gibson's Crack (5.6?).

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quote:

Originally posted by Figger Eight:

Bring John Long's "Climbing Anchors" book with you.
[big Grin]

I second that

[big Grin]

 

hey figgereight, what up??? [Wink]

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[laf][laf][laf][Wink] I hear you, but I think you are pretty safe as long as you can climb [big Grin]

 

[ 10-20-2002, 01:39 PM: Message edited by: Muffy The Wanker Sprayer ]

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is that a dreded double post??? or are we experiencing technical difficulties??? [Razz][Wink]

 

[ 10-20-2002, 01:49 PM: Message edited by: Muffy The Wanker Sprayer ]

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John Long's books are excellent;spend time at your local crag practicing placements on what you can reach from the ground(no partner required) or on toprope,where you can test with a bit more realism.Also,you have a great club right there in Vancouver; the Ptarmigans,with a wealth of long experienced trad climbers and a famous history(ever hear of the Ptarmigan Traverse?).Get in touch with them.

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quote:

Originally posted by Figger Eight:

Bring John Long's "Climbing Anchors" book with you.
[big Grin]

What I was hoping to get. Thank you.

 

quote:

Originally posted by pope:

Drive right past the library and head to Leavenworth where you'll find an (open) book called Gibson's Crack (5.6?).

What I was afraid I'd get.

 

quote:

Originally posted by pope:

I'm happy to instruct for $150 per diem or $250 for the Wochenende (just trying to get in the Leavenworth frame of mind). You drive and cook. It'll save you money on library fees. What say?

I guess I never thought of this one!

 

quote:

Originally posted by Muffy The Wanker Sprayer:
...there are people who are willing to climb with you just to climb...and more willing to share knowledge for free.

Easier said than done!! Trust me, I know!!

 

Any other books worth looking at? My plan, pope, is to read what I can, go out and practice it and repeat until I got this leading thing down. Practice is the key I know, but knowing what to practice is kinda good, also!!

 

Craig

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'how to rock climb' & 'adavanced rock climbing' cover a bit of leading... got to love jon long... well at least I do [Wink] I have not read 'freedom of the hills' but it might have something.... other than that, miles on the rock. Tex always tells me "place early and often" practice on the ground TONS. I hope you have more luck with the head game than I am having [Roll Eyes] I suck [Embarrassed]

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I was under the impression it was more focused for alpine mountain climbing types... not cragging [Razz] what do I know??? I said I hadn't read it [Razz][Wink]

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Supplementary reading certainly won't hurt. Everything you really need to know is in Freedom of the Hills, which is available at the library for free. However, the game is not played sitting down. A former student went to Leavenworth after reading a few chapters of one manual or another. His independent study had resulted in a gap in his understanding, a misconception which wasn't caught by a mentor (I was invited to attend their weekend adventure but couldn't make it). Gravity is a hard teacher. When his TR anchor failed, he fell 35 feet into the talus and with three broken limbs and a broken cheek bone....he got off lucky. The laws of physics were there to find the misconceptions that resulted from his approach to learning the craft.

 

Again, what price is too high? I recommend that you study a good manual, and then hire a guide.

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dear pope,

 

did you higher a guide to learn to climb??? or did you and dwayner flayl arround all over the mountains and crags like the rest of us gumbys???

 

just wondering

you know I luv ya [Wink]

sk

 

one step at a time, one skill at a time, don't push, don't rush, practice close to the ground.

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quote:

Originally posted by Muffy The Wanker Sprayer:

dear pope,

 

did you higher a guide to learn to climb???

I did take a class, but mostly I learned through reading/experimenting. I had a good friend who knew just enough to get us in trouble. But I was an 17-year-old punk and couldn't have afforded a guide. My folks simply discouraged my participation, but if they'd been smart, they'd have helped me hire a guide (or at least insisted that I hire one). I had no small number of close calls those first few years. We used to go out to Index with only one cam on the rack and see what happened.

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thaught so [big Grin] thanks for answering my question [Wink] I am not realy saying that one way is better than another. I can not afford to higher a guide. But I am REALY lucky to have met and climbed with some amazing climbers and wonderful people.

 

bottom line it is all about commen sense. I have seen so called "giudes" teach cragging at the local rock... and it strikes terror in my soul. some people are getting duped and paying for bogus lessons. so if you do higher some one, higher some one who realy does know their stuff [smile]

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quote:

Everything you really need to know is in Freedom of the Hills

FOTH, great book that it is, sucks big time for rock anchor building. I hear that is one of the main things the Mounties will be totally redoing for the 7th edition.

I second the bid for Long's Climbing Anchors, but that doesn't tell you how to lead, just how to build anchors and place gear. Advanced Rock Climbing, by Long and Luebben, is a better all-around resource - technique, leading, anchors (a bit), essential rock rescue, and the overall gestalt of climbing. Buy that one, and Climbing Anchors, and study them both religiously. But proper one-on one instruction is pretty key too. You might just think about pope's offer...

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PAGE TOP!

Lead easy climbs that you have TR'd many times, (i.e. 5.4-5.7).

 

Place gear on TR as you climb, find the sweet spots for the gear, then climb the route.

 

Find a good belayer

 

Find a route that is not meandering, and more straight up so you dont have to worry about runners.

 

Some good routes in Leavenworth that you might check out:

 

Clamshell Cave:

Noisy Oyster

Keep Clam

 

Barney's Rubble

5.6 Lieback

 

X-Y Cracks (short & easy routes 5.5-5.7)

Just a few thoughts........

 

[ 10-20-2002, 11:34 PM: Message edited by: scot'teryx ]

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p.s. sometimes finding someone who is willing to teach helps as well. even if you just go out with someone once or twice it helps. Don't be affraid to climb with lots of diffrent people. For me that has helped alot. [Cool]

 

but then I suck [Roll Eyes] what do I know [big Grin][Wink]

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I'm happy to instruct for $150 per diem or $250 for the Wochenende (just trying to get in the Leavenworth frame of mind). You drive and cook. It'll save you money on library fees. What say?

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ummmm, well, you see, I don't actualy have any money, so unless you want to just hang out with me because I am fun well forget it, you money grubbing capitolist [Razz][Wink]

 

Craig, although I am sure POPE rocks and is a great climber [Wink] there are people who are willing to climb with you just to climb. Look for someone who is still learning but has more experience than you... they are less JADED [Wink] and more willing to share knowledge for free. be careful and use commen sense. There are people out there who think they can do things that they can't do [Eek!][Eek!]

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quote:

Originally posted by Muffy The Wanker Sprayer:

ummmm, well, you see, I don't actualy have any money, so unless you want to just hang out with me because I am fun well forget it, you money grubbing capitolist
[Razz][Wink]

 

Craig, although I am sure POPE rocks and is a great climber
[Wink]
there are people who are willing to climb with you just to climb. Look for someone who is still learning but has more experience than you... they are less JADED
[Wink]
and more willing to share knowledge for free. be careful and use commen sense. There are people out there who think they can do things that they can't do
[Eek!][Eek!]

Hey......whatever! The thoroughness with which you explore the fundamental skills and concepts employed in preventing a potentially fatal accident should NOT be suprervised by a climber with a mediocre level of competence, no matter how enthusiastic or altruistic he/she may be. What price would be too high when your future personal safety will depend on the quality of your preparation?

 

My fee is reasonable. Payment plans will be extended to those with positive credit references.

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[laf][laf] when I have $ you will be the first one I call [Razz]

 

learning with some one who is learning as well is better than hitting that 5.6 you sugested with NOTHING [Razz]

 

I personaly prefer ropeguns who carry my pack, cook my food, drive, and kiss my ass as well [big Grin]

 

I will let you know when I find one [laf][laf]

 

[ 10-20-2002, 01:59 PM: Message edited by: Muffy The Wanker Sprayer ]

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