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Any Tips On Keeping Water From Freezing On Climbs?

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quote:

Originally posted by Dru:

I read in Sci American a few months back a piece on circadian rhythms which points out that the human body is primed to defecate at the equivalent of 8 AM every morning so maybe the coffee thing is a coincidence.

I've tested the theory, albeit unintentionally. No coffee....no movement.

 

I have substituted a good chew on several occasions when bc conditions have made my bod a little less than cooperative and the coffee isn't doing the trick...works like a charm if you can stand the nausea. (obviously not a regular user)

 

[ 10-18-2002, 05:15 PM: Message edited by: Thinker ]

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My indestructible french press and Cafe Vita coffee go in the bc with me every time.

 

Heck, I usually haul it (and a stove) to the summit of Mt. Reindeer for a quick pick-me-up before heading down.

 

edit: oh yeah, it helps with regularity when brewed good and strong. Plus the coffee grounds added to a blue bag help mellow out the stink a bit.

 

[ 10-18-2002, 12:18 PM: Message edited by: Thinker ]

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A problem/side effect of coffee is that it is a diaretic, yeah it sure helps get things moving in the a.m. but it also inhibits the absobtion of minerals and other nutrients. I think for short trips into the mountains it's no big deal, but on a longer trip, say a month or longer it might pose some problems when fresh foods are scarce. just my .02

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You can insulate your bottle, or keep it close to your body. I've been putting a Platypus 1/2 liter bag in my jacket pocket for the last year, and I like it better than a Nalgene bottle because it's malleable. I've also been using a hydration pack type bladder, and keep it deep in my pack. To keep the tube ice-free, I blow back after drinking. The bummer with the hydration pack is not knowing how much water I've got, and I'm afraid of the inevitable pack-soaking blowout. The neprene nalgene bottle insulators do work well.

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Two ideas:

 

1. Lower the freezing temperature by adding a little salt.

 

2. Climb in a gym where you don't have to encounter such difficulties.

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The Jacket I use when climbing has very large pockets in the chest area. They are large enough to put an 8 1/2" X 11 notebook in each. I put a platapus style, soft flask in each and my body heat keeps it from freezing. I'm with some of the others in that using your body heat is the way to go. bigdrink.gif

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gatorade, cytomax, et al = a little salt = less of a freezing problem. I carry along dry, and add if I melt, easier on my stomach to drink some of my calories...

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OR makes an insulated pouch for a 1 liter Nalgene bottle that works great. If you put the water in the bottle hot, it will still be warm after several hours. If it is really cold put the bottle in upside down so the ice will not clog the threads.

 

If you don't have the money or access to the OR product, make your own insulation out of an old piece of closed cell polyurethane foam using duct tape.

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I've been using one of those soft Nalgene "Cantene" bottles for the last couple of weeks during some winter attempts at Long's Peak. They are nice because putting them in your jacket is less uncomfortable when they mold to the shape of your body. Unfortunately after about two weeks of steady use, mine developed a leak where the soft plastic is fused to the hard plastic of the mouth of the bottle. Nalgene says it is guaranteed leakproof, though, so maybe they will replace it. I guess from now on I should buy these bottles at REI, where returns are most easy (I did not and also did not save the receipt). Has anyone else had leak problems with these bottles?

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i heard if you reuse your pee bottle as your water bottle it won't freeze. any guinea pigs want to test this one out?

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I'd like to second the idea of wearing a camelback under a jacket. This works extremely well in cold temperatures.

 

The biggest issue with keeping a camelback deep in your pack is the tube. This is the part that is most likely to freeze up. As such, an additional note to wearing a camelback under a jacket is to allow the tube to go down your sleeve. Then you can pull back your sleeve at the wrist a bit to take a sip.

 

If you want the tube to come out at the neck of your jacket, after taking a sip, you must blow the remaining water out of the tube and back into the camelback. This simply provides less to freeze.

 

I've used this system both in the Alaska range and in the Andes and in both cases it has worked out really well.

 

One note on the melting of snow comment: People might be telling the guy to add something to melted snow because the melt-water tastes bad. If you don't add water to the snow in your pot when melting it, the snow gets a burnt taste from the pot.

 

Jason

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Again I'll re-iterate. Just put it in your pack, closest to your back. Put Your extra clothing around it on the outside part and on top. Shouldn't freeze. Pu insulation on the tube if it is a water bladder. Maker sure you run the tube inder your armpit. You may even try puting the tube through your armpit vents and up through by your chest in the jacket.

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How the hell can you burn snow confused.gif

You don't burn snow, you burn the bottom of the pot. And then everything tastes really nasty. Usually happens if you have the stove cranked and nothing in the pot.

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i heard if you reuse your pee bottle as your water bottle it won't freeze.

 

Yes, this process helps to prevent freezing, but you must effect another step in the process: offer the first sip from subject pee-bottle-turned-water-bottle to unsuspecting climbing partner before water is frozen. After grateful partner has sipped, with bottle still in his/her hands, inform him/her of history of use of vessel. Subsequent emotional outburst and corelative increase in pulse and blood pressure of partner brings water in bottle to near boiling point. Replace bottle to insulated confine.

 

Syudla pulled this one on me... dick.

 

hellno3d.gifcry.gif

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actually, you're burning all the impurities in the snow

 

Actually you're burning the nasty dinner you ate last.

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