Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
LostCamKenny

WTF! Climber falls on St Helens!

Recommended Posts

WTF! It's not like there are a bazillion warnings on various websites and such to stay the fuck away from the cornice at the top.

 

A couple of years ago some sledder fell in the crater too when he walked out to the edge to "get a better look" after driving his 2T smoke belch-o-matic 2000 up to the summit. (Which is now banned, thanks to that guy!)

 

Hope this guy is OK, but that could have been a long slide. He's pretty lucky that someone was able to get a signal to call 911, since cell phones rarely work on the Mountain. I hope the USCG gets him out in one piece.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hope this guy is OK, but that could have been a long slide. He's pretty lucky that someone was able to get a signal to call 911, since cell phones rarely work on the Mountain. I hope the USCG gets him out in one piece.

 

It was 1pm when the authorities were notified, it appears from the story that although his buddies had plenty of time, they didn't go get him, probably expecting that someone else would take care of it. If that's true, then I agree with the WTF part of your title. The search is suspended until tomorrow...dudes laying up there right now.

 

Shit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The search is suspended until tomorrow...dudes laying up there right now.

 

Shit.

 

gonna be a cold night up there... best thoughts for him and his family!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The same cornice almost got me a few weeks ago while snowboarding. I was eating an Apple for lunch when the whole thing cuts under my feet. I was able to jump off the block and face first dived back onto the ridge, made an awful noise as it rushed down into the crater. I felt bad as it scared the crap out of a large group of Mazams that were up there.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why not rappel into the crater and get him.

 

If it's anything like the time the Sledder fell in the crater, he fell over 1100', so that would have be one reallllly long rope. That time they plucked him out with a helicopter. I suspect that is exactly what they where trying to do today, but winds and weather made it unsafe.

 

It's going to be a long night, even if the guy is not hurt. Who knows what kind of clothes he had with him, or if even a pack made it with him, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hoping he gets out alright, with what the weather looks like tomorrow he might be there another day before a heli can get to him

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why not rappel into the crater and get him.

 

Most parties don't bring a rope. It's a pretty straightforward snow slog.

 

When I was there in May of 2007, somebody postholed 20 feet back from the edge, and could see daylight under their feet. Yikes!

 

I hope he keeps blowing that whistle, maybe it will help him stay warm :mistat:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sending warm thoughts his way.

 

I assume everything possible was done to get aid to this guy??

 

Stefan should head south!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In spite of the conditions, the rescue chopper was evidently able to locate him and they actually did send a man down to him. However the decision was made to pull the rescuer out due to rockfall and avalanche danger. I'm a little mystified as to why they couldn't have brought the climber up with the rescuer, but perhaps he was injured and it would have taken more time to get him ready to bring him up than they felt was prudent, given the conditions.

 

But what we're not told is if they dropped any survival gear to the climber, any sort of shelter/space blanket, food, snow shovel, etc. Seems they could have at least done that, or sent it down with the rescuer. But, I wasn't there. At least they they have a fix on his location for in the morning. Hope to hell he makes it.

 

If he still has his ice axe he might, if he's physically able, be able to anchor himself securely and even dig out a trench, snow cave, or some kind of rudimentary shelter. This again is something it seems to me the rescue personnel could have facilitated. The way they've handled this so far seems questionable at the least, but I'll have to reserve judgement till we know the full story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The way they've handled this so far seems questionable at the least, but I'll have to reserve judgment till we know the full story.

 

These USGS guys that you "reserve judgment" on don't have a mandate to rescue or help anyone, but they put their lives on the line when they at least tried to help that climber, which is very admirable. The details how and what they did are actually insignificant.

 

Contrast the USGS efforts on St. Helens to save the climber yesterday, against the Seattle Metro security officers and and POLICE, who stood by and did nothing when that young lady begged for help...and then got beat up, as we witnessed on the recent video.

 

Both groups of people are public servants. It's interesting to see the difference in how people go out of their way, beyond their mandate, to help or not help those in need.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too bad nobody had skis...do a Cornice Drop block test on a section away from the climber then ski down and over to the guy...or infact the spot that he fell at would have been sufficent enough to ski down to him....Hope he's still warm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.kgw.com/news/local/Kelso-climber-fell-near-craters-Shoestring-Notch-84486752.html

 

They give all kinds of details but not if he got fished out. I woke up twice last night (oh, the joys of being old) and was thinking of this guy alone and in the cold, possibly separated from his backpack and laying in the snow with a broken leg or hip: as I listened to the rain pelting onto my roof inside my nice warm home. To anyone who climbs with me, I ain't coming back without you. If you spend the night out, I'm there with ya unless I absolutely have to go for help, and even then, I'll be trying my best to make sure you got an extra layer of my clothes on you and my pack to lay on before I sprint. I expect the same from anyone who goes out with me. Hopefully that happened in this case, we don't know from the fragmented reports.

 

This kind of thing could easily happen to any of us (as Nate says above) Hoping for the best for this guy and that he gets out to give his loved ones a hug and to get out and climb again.

 

 

Full story text:

"by Eric Adams

 

Posted on February 16, 2010 at 9:57 AM

 

 

MOUNT ST. HELENS, Wash. -- The climber who fell into Mount St. Helens on Monday was located near a well-known area, the Shoestring Notch, just behind a glacier with the same name, according to rescuers with the U.S. Coast Guard.

 

Shoestring Notch is located in the southeast corner along the volcano crater's back wall, which is 8,600 feet tall according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

 

Those who know him described Joseph Bohlig as an experienced climber who's summitted St. Helens nearly 70 times. Skamania County Undersheriff David Cox said he fell 1,500 feet to the rocky crater floor."

 

opps, I see LCK just linked the same story.

Edited by billcoe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Bohlig was standing on a cornice to have his photo taken"

"Bohlig an experienced climber"

 

I Hope they get him out of there.

 

If his friends ended up not doing anything and waiting for SAR then if I was him and I was alive I would kill my friends.

 

-Todd

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.komonews.com/news/local/84480982.html

 

"There was no movement of the head, no attempt to signal," said Lt. Brooks Crawford, the pilot of a Coast Guard helicopter. He said the man's torso was covered with snow, with his arms, legs and head sticking out.

sad day

 

Bohlig was alive and blowing a rescue whistle soon after the fall. He had climbed the volcano 68 times before Monday's accident, Cox said.

sucks that after all those trips this one is where the mistake was made...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never been to that mountain or spot, I imagine to solo

down it would have to be suicidal before I would not do it, to get

to a partner.

 

Goes to show that self rescue is the best option or at least

set up camp around a injured party, if at all possible.

I have been thinking to bring bivy gear, even on day trips

just for such a accidental, for in case. Belay coat and

half sleeping bag, light stove and pot for water.

 

Helo rescue is great, but depends on good weather.

 

Dan

Edited by DanO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×