Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
punk_rocker333

Ice/mountain boots for narrow feet

Recommended Posts

I have an A-width heel and B-width forefoot (size 10) and am having problems finding mountain/ice boots that fit my feet well. I purchased a pair of Lowa Cristallo X-Pro's from sierra trading post:

 

boots

 

These seem to fit my feet very well compared to the Mad Rock Alpinists I bought originally, but I still get a small amount of heel lift when I stand on my toes (super feet help with this slightly). This worries me for front pointing. I was only able to find one review for the boot in regards to how they climb ice (not just general mountaineering use) here:

 

review

 

I have two questions. Does anyone have any experience with these boots for technical ice and mixed routes? Do you have any recomendations for other boots I could look at that fit narrow feet? I was looking at the La Sportiva Nepal Evo GTX. Any experience with these?

Edited by punk_rocker333

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a fairly narrow foot and I have unfortuantely found that La Sportiva boots are way too wide for me. The boots that worked best for me are the lace-up style Vasque M-Possible SS Mountaineering boots, though they appear to not have the same quality of build as La Sportiva boots. Other boots that had a fairly narrow fit were the Mammut Mammuks and to a lesser degree the Scarpa Freney XT GTX (I had a little more heel lift in these). In retrospect, I should have probably tried a female version of the Nepal Evo GTX as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I was looking at the La Sportiva Nepal Evo GTX. Any experience with these?"

 

I have a similar foot and the Nepal Evos (Nepal lasts) offers me a very good fit. Trango series is not a great fit for me.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

no experience with that Lowa boot but I'm sure it will perform well if it fits well.

 

I'm in the same boat with narrow/low volume feet.

 

Trangos with the orange Superfeet work well for me and the Silver Evo Extreme performs well and is warm enough for 95%+ of what I'll do and it is comfortable to hike in. Did the slog up the DC on Rainier when the Paradise trails were all pavement with no comfort issues.

 

The Nepal fits well too, especially in the heel. Locks down quite nice. That and it has a customizable tongue to better improve the fit. It's just shy of a pound heavier per pair.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just gone through replacing my old mountaineering boots. I too have low volume narrow feet and after trying on quite a few boots I settled on the La Sportiva Nepal Evo GTX. I've had them out several times now and have been happy with them.

 

They do seem to lock down the heel better than the others I tried, and I haven't had any heel slip with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have similar feet and wore the trango the last few seasons with a shim, insoles, lacing tricks, etc...and always had some heel slip and cold toes. At Dane's recommendation, I tried the Nepal and they are a dream. Lots of wiggle room in the toes, snug in the heel, and warmer. All right out of the box. I trust my feet way more now and climb much better and more relaxed as a result.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Punk, worth checking out "ruti's" comments above as well. I own and climb in two different versions of the Trangos. Neither fit me as well as the Nepals, which are my go-to boots if I had to have only one pair.

 

But some distict differences in the Trangos over the Nepals, lighter for sure, easier to walk in and climb hard mixed in for me...more like a rock shoe than a boot. Perfect summer alpine boot. Nepal is a real BOOT. But the Trango last is a littly funky for me..bit small in the toe box, heels lace in tight but are no longer comfortable as the Nepal. I've walked a bunch in the Trango but I also get sore feet when I do because of the narrow toe box.

 

Nepal last is different, tighter heels, bigger toe box.

Great 4 season boot anywhere but up high in winter. But they have been used there as well.

 

Nepal is way warmer (easily compares to the Batura for me) but the Trago Extreme Evo is warm enough for most things short of really cold full on winter temps for me using a knee length gaiter.

 

For a water or alpine ice boot I like some ankle support and a stiff sole and as much warmth as I can get. I use the Trango/Batura for mixed or long approaches. I use the Nepals on almost all of my ice.

 

Trango or Batura both work on ice but neither offers the ankle support of a Nepal.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the great suggestions. I have only been ice climbing once so I am very new to it all. Have always used BD strapons for the snow climbs I've done in the mountains. I am looking to own just one pair of boots for ice and mountain so I am leaning more towards the Nepals. I found a pretty good deal on a pair for $200. Will compare these to the Lowas and keep whichever fits best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect Dane yould concur here. If you can get a properly fitting pair of the Nepal's for $200.00 buy them guick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Asolos are narrower than Sportivas. The Cholatse is a nice ice boot that is warm and super light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Asolo Titans are wide dude - much wider than any La Sportiva I've ever tried on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Asolos are narrower than Sportivas. The Cholatse is a nice ice boot that is warm and super light.

 

Cholatse is a nice boot. And everyone's feet are different but the Cholatse is a way wider fit on my foot than any Sportiva.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Asolos are narrower than Sportivas.

 

La Sportiva's are too tight around the toes for me. Asolos Titans are fine.

 

YMMV.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still having trouble fitting my low volume feet in the Nepal. Usual boot/shoe size is 12 which approximates La Sportiva's 45.5. Tried 3 different pairs of 45s, 45.5s, and 46 - each pair fit slightly differently even in the same size, reportedly because they are hand built. One pair of 45s felt best, but I feared they would not allow me the 1/2" growth my feet go though on a long day.

 

Used the lightly broken-in 46s this last week on mixed at Ouray and they felt almost as clumsy as my old plastics. Laced them at least 12 different ways with different sock combis & only found a stable system once - which I was not able to repeat (yet); I suspect lacing must be EXTREMELY sensitive with these new Nepals - at least until broken in.

 

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've owned 3 different models of sportiva ice boots and Ice climbed in 5 different models and my current Asolo Cholatses are narrower than any of the five pair. Give them a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×