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sierraglacier

Alpine/gl;acier mountaineering

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After 15 years of backpakcing in the high country, I am ready for hitting the glaciers and snowfields of the Cascades. After traveling in Nepal and India last year, I returned to the US to settle in the NW to learn alpine climbing. I was all signed up for The Mountaineers, but in a bait and switch maneuver, I was denied even being on the waiting list. I have most of my equipment I would need, as I have been with REI in the last 6 months. Now, I could a knowlegeable climbing partner to show me the ropes of glacier travel. any suggestions out there for hooking up with others?

 

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good to hear you got shafted from the mtneers. i go climbing about 4 days a week with various partners. you are always welcome along when we are out cragging. i find that it is a better way to see if you want to climb with certain people. i know that you are a beginner, so personally i would be careful with who teaches you. there are many different styles and ethics to learn you just have to choose which ones you see yourself flourish within. i would try and learn basics before you go to the mtns, so you can have a much more enjoyable time. myself and most of my close partners are all self taught, so if you feel motivated enough that might be an option.

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I would suspect you already have many basic mountaineering skills if you've spent 15 years rambling around the high country. I would offer caution about who you partner up with if you want to do a climbing aprenticeship rather than a basic course like the Mountaineers offer. Getting partnered up with the wrong person or people could be a huge downer. I guess I don't have a good suggestion on how to hook up with the right people, I was lucky enough to make friends with several good guys that were into climbing and we've learned together the last several years. I agree some of the stuff is intuitive and you can teach yourself (I did). Like 3rd class rock scrambling or kicking steps in snow (as long as it's not real steep and run out). Obviously when you get into more technical rock climbing that involves ropes and pro it's not something you can just start doing by yourself. Hopefully this post will be a good start to finding some climbing partners and good luck.

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I got in on that climbing course that you are talking about it is a good course but I don't care for the organization all that much ( a little too militant for me ) The field trips are over after next weekend and I am looking for Rainier Partners . I would be happy to pass on to you the information that I have learned.I'm 43 married 2 kids and I am in good shape for climbing . Lets practice and do Rainier.

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I'm in the same boat -- I want to improve my glacier travel skills and increase my circle of climbing friends. I climbed Rainier with a mentor many years ago (I'm 41 now), and have done a number of non-technical climbs this spring (St Helens in late April, Snoqualmie Mtn yesterday). I'm considering taking a Crevace Rescue class to brush up on my skills. I have the equipment and am definitely up for some practice -- lets do an outting!

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A glacier novice myself, I'm afraid I don't have much as far as real advice. But great book to read, if you've not picked it up already, is Andy Selter's "Glacier Travel and Crevasse Rescue" (I think there's a second edition out now.) I'd really like to head out to a grass field some afternoon and practice his rigs. Outside of the z-pully they get kinda tricky, and I'd like to have a go at them b/f a trip to the field. Any takers?

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