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bushman

Drury Falls mishap

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Wow, another epic on the river. Just keep on finding out about more river epics: John Stoddard in 1980, Monty Piton in '84, Doug in '88, rat and MJ in '87.

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It doesn't take that long to walk around.

 

I've been looking at climbing Drury, and am not to keen on the river...I'm not a rafter...

 

Do you have info on the hike around. We've looked at it from 2 and it seems to cliff out.

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Wow, another epic on the river. Just keep on finding out about more river epics: John Stoddard in 1980, Monty Piton in '84, Doug in '88, rat and MJ in '87.

 

 

share these stories!

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It doesn't take that long to walk around.

 

I've been looking at climbing Drury, and am not to keen on the river...I'm not a rafter...

 

Do you have info on the hike around. We've looked at it from 2 and it seems to cliff out.

 

Park on the south side of the river b4 the metal bridge and hike downstream. It goes.

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Reading the comments attached to the World story, I am struck by commentators' ignorance of their own state constitution. Anyone familiar with the constitution of the state of Washington would know that no sheriff anywhere in the state can legally charge a recipient of rescue service for the sheriffs department's costs. The state constitution mandates that county sheriffs provide such services at no charge! (one reason they depend so heavily on volunteer SAR units) At Osprey, however, Gary would be well within his rights to send a bill, just like ambulance companies throughout the state routinely bill recipients of their services provided in SAR operations. (Collecting on those bills is entirely another matter, though...) That's an easy place to get in trouble, with extremely serious consequences (a Grade VI rapid, variously known as The Wall, or The Quartermile Drop immediately downstream continuing all the way to the candy store. These guys are damned lucky to be alive!!!

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A winter white water approach sounds pretty fun. Quite the adventure... Most people in SAR that i know loooove going out on calls.

Edited by RokIzGud

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I'm glad to hear that Alex, Dan, and the other two are okay. It's a tricky crossing no matter how it's done and not to be taken lightly: I've done it three times in an inflatable raft.

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I'm glad to hear that Alex, Dan, and the other two are okay. It's a tricky crossing no matter how it's done and not to be taken lightly: I've done it three times in an inflatable raft.

:tup:

Remember to take your crampons off.

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In the name of safe crossings of the Wenatchee river, I'd like to suggest that climbers cross at the Candy Store in the lake that forms there and walk upstream on the other side. It totally avoids any risk of falling into fast moving cold water...something more likely to kill you than climbing Drury falls unless you are also ignorant of avalanche conditions.

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Way to go guys, you made that guy in the raft set aside his boilermaking business to come get your sorry asses.

 

Very lame, CC. You've shown yourself to be equivalent to the "fine them" commentators below popular media articles. As a climber, you should know that sometimes things go awry for experienced folks as well as noobs, and media often distorts the facts to make a good story. Someday you or your buddies may need to be rescued, so maybe you shouldn't be so quick to cast the first stone here.

 

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any landing you can walk away from... :)

Glad to hear everything turned out for the :tup: and you were able to enjoy a hearty breakfast.

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Way to go guys, you made that guy in the raft set aside his boilermaking business to come get your sorry asses.

 

Very lame, CC. You've shown yourself to be equivalent to the "fine them" commentators below popular media articles. As a climber, you should know that sometimes things go awry for experienced folks as well as noobs, and media often distorts the facts to make a good story. Someday you or your buddies may need to be rescued, so maybe you shouldn't be so quick to cast the first stone here.

 

:lmao:

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don't you realize how much those cost??? do you realize how far they were past the first marker???????????/

 

Are you talking about the SAR mission cost? It really doesnt cost that much.

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Way to go guys, you made that guy in the raft set aside his boilermaking business to come get your sorry asses.

 

Don't bother the boilermakers

 

 

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Well, I am here so... Not much to report, really. Put the boat in, paddle broke, lost 5 - 10 secs and ended up in a stronger stream. A smaller footprint boat was not as stable, etc. From a storytelling perspective "Climbing"-s mini-epics are most often more dramatic, or funny. I recall the Banff ice guide's story about dudes getting totally soaked in Ghost valley but finishing a WI5 climb! I'd definitely "humbly" bragged if we went and climbed even say Hubba Hubba :grin: I actually was the first one to reject the idea of putting the wet boots and pants on. BTW, Careno area had some pretty good looking ice.

 

To be sure, very, very grateful to be alive, leave unscathed, to retrieve all our gear and that SAR was super-kind to let us take it, and police being kind and encouraging!

 

SAR costs, Obama death panels and birth certificates, ghosts, vampires, Tiger Woods, breakfast cereal - man, you name a thing and there will be loads and loads of fat, and not so fat people, grandmas included, shouting at the top of their lungs and gathering stones or kindling. Does anybody have stats about the costs of highway accident recoveries, versus say all others combined?

 

CC - the "boiler-maker guy" Gary was the most stern, but clearly a very skilled rafter, it was amazing to go back in their raft - we had to paddle as well - and follow his commands, made crossing feel really easy, and cool in fact.

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Well, I am here so... Not much to report, really. Put the boat in, paddle broke, lost 5 - 10 secs and ended up in a stronger stream. A smaller footprint boat was not as stable, etc. From a storytelling perspective "Climbing"-s mini-epics are most often more dramatic, or funny. I recall the Banff ice guide's story about dudes getting totally soaked in Ghost valley but finishing a WI5 climb! I'd definitely "humbly" bragged if we went and climbed even say Hubba Hubba :grin: I actually was the first one to reject the idea of putting the wet boots and pants on. BTW, Careno area had some pretty good looking ice.

 

To be sure, very, very grateful to be alive, leave unscathed, to retrieve all our gear and that SAR was super-kind to let us take it, and police being kind and encouraging!

 

SAR costs, Obama death panels and birth certificates, ghosts, vampires, Tiger Woods, breakfast cereal - man, you name a thing and there will be loads and loads of fat, and not so fat people, grandmas included, shouting at the top of their lungs and gathering stones or kindling. Does anybody have stats about the costs of highway accident recoveries, versus say all others combined?

 

CC - the "boiler-maker guy" Gary was the most stern, but clearly a very skilled rafter, it was amazing to go back in their raft - we had to paddle as well - and follow his commands, made crossing feel really easy, and cool in fact.

 

Hey dude, to me it sounds like a very exciting adventure. Just dont die and its all good. Like i said most people in SAR love missions.... Body recovery is another story.

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