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billcoe

Hebrew thread?

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Just the opposite: smearing is kosher, coating is for the unchosen.

 

I think you mean "shmeering" is kosher, shmegege.

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hmmm, lets just say that she's all Kosher, warm, snugly and 100 percent natural fibres for now shall we:-)

 

:shock:

 

Love those dress up shoes but I bet they hurt the little hooves.

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Raw or undercooked pork (along w/ bear, feral cat, fox, dog, wolf, horse, seal, or walrus) may be infected with Trichinella cysts. Trichinosis is the resultant disease occurring when the cysts enter your stomach. You start feeling sick 1-3 days later and remain that way for months. When a human or animal eats meat that contains infective Trichinella cysts, the acid in the stomach dissolves the hard covering of the cyst and releases the worms. The worms pass into the small intestine and, in 1-2 days, become mature. After mating, adult females lay eggs. Eggs develop into immature worms, travel through the arteries, and are transported to muscles. Within the muscles, the worms curl into a ball and encyst (become enclosed in a capsule). Is that nasty or what? Remember that up until the last hundred or so years nobody knew pork had to be cooked really well before it is safe to eat. So maybe one of the old bible boys figured out that if people get very sick from eating pigs, better to just not eat them?

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Raw or undercooked pork (along w/ bear, feral cat, fox, dog, wolf, horse, seal, or walrus) may be infected with Trichinella cysts. Trichinosis is the resultant disease occurring when the cysts enter your stomach. You start feeling sick 1-3 days later and remain that way for months. When a human or animal eats meat that contains infective Trichinella cysts, the acid in the stomach dissolves the hard covering of the cyst and releases the worms. The worms pass into the small intestine and, in 1-2 days, become mature. After mating, adult females lay eggs. Eggs develop into immature worms, travel through the arteries, and are transported to muscles. Within the muscles, the worms curl into a ball and encyst (become enclosed in a capsule). Is that nasty or what? Remember that up until the last hundred or so years nobody knew pork had to be cooked really well before it is safe to eat. So maybe one of the old bible boys figured out that if people get very sick from eating pigs, better to just not eat them?

 

I don't believe trichinosis is much of a real threat in pork in the US these days

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Is that because you believe factory pig farms are safe and sanitary? :laf:

 

pig-farm.jpg

 

No. I've read about it before.

 

From Wikipedia: "The few cases in the United States are mostly the result of eating undercooked game, bear meat, or home reared pigs."

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