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thelawgoddess

partner wanted for a day of ice

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quote:

Originally posted by Cpt.Caveman:

58 experts on ice

-

 

thanks for the pics and beta, scot'teryx. not the 90-degree slopes i was hoping for ... but i guess it's still better than foam! -

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For most people I would not recommend learning to lead on 90 degree slopes. [Wink] Don't let your ego get you hurt ice climbing. Bring it on mellow and be happy with what you accomplish. Challenging yourself is good but don't let it bite you in the ass. Especially if you are leading and not just follwing up the rope like a robot. I still am learning and get gripped leading 90 degree ice. It's not like rock climbing. More work envolved for me. More strenuous.

 

[ 10-23-2002, 11:12 AM: Message edited by: Cpt.Caveman ]

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Plus, you must be very efficient at placing screws. Takes more time than placing a piece of trad gear and you better like run-outs b/c placing screws every 20-30 ft is not uncommon. Oh yeah, and falling is not an option.

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quote:

Originally posted by scot'teryx:

-

 

I think it's Tiger mountain?

In the lower left corner of Tiger here is a fairly substantial ice wall. Has anyone tried climbing it? Rock fall might be an issue. [Eek!]

 

jc

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I think it's Tiger mountain?

 

In the lower left corner of Tiger here is a fairly substantial ice wall. Has anyone tried climbing it? Rock fall might be an issue.

 

Its much lower angle and shorter than NF Observation Rock, which is fairly low angle and short to begin with. By the time you do the approach and the climb, and realize how large the ratio of approach/climb is, you look at all that stuff a little further up and think "why bother?"

 

Alex

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quote:

Originally posted by Cpt.Caveman:

For most people I would not recommend learning to lead on 90 degree slopes.
[Wink]
Don't let your ego get you hurt ice climbing. Bring it on mellow and be happy with what you accomplish. Challenging yourself is good but don't let it bite you in the ass. Especially if you are leading and not just follwing up the rope like a robot. I still am learning and get gripped leading 90 degree ice. It's not like rock climbing. More work envolved for me. More strenuous.

I couldn't agree more. You know you're in it deep when the thought "at least I'm going to die doing what I loved..." keeps going through your mind...

 

Do yourself a favor TLG, and spend an hour or so "hiking" up and down the lower third of Obs. Rock working on foot placements. It's not as sexy as vertical ice, but it'll ramp up your technique even quicker than the styrofoam wall. Practice standing on your front points long enough to place two screws and build an anchor... Build an Ablakov anchor.

 

OR is a great little climb. I'd be willing to escort you, but I sliced the tip of my finger in half and I want to give it a week to 'reanneal.' PM me if you want to go in November.

 

-t

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quote:

Originally posted by thelawgoddess:

observation rock rocked my world this weekend - thanks to "my" alpine buddy of the week: col von spanker.
[big Grin]

 

two words for now: calf raises.
[Roll Eyes]

two words: French Technique

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quote:

Originally posted by terrible ted:

quote:

Originally posted by Cpt.Caveman:

For most people I would not recommend learning to lead on 90 degree slopes.
[Wink]
Don't let your ego get you hurt ice climbing. Bring it on mellow and be happy with what you accomplish. Challenging yourself is good but don't let it bite you in the ass. Especially if you are leading and not just follwing up the rope like a robot. I still am learning and get gripped leading 90 degree ice. It's not like rock climbing. More work envolved for me. More strenuous.

I couldn't agree more. You know you're in it deep when the thought "at least I'm going to die doing what I loved..." keeps going through your mind...

 

Do yourself a favor TLG, and spend an hour or so "hiking" up and down the lower third of Obs. Rock working on foot placements. It's not as sexy as vertical ice, but it'll ramp up your technique even quicker than the styrofoam wall. Practice standing on your front points long enough to place two screws and build an anchor... Build an Ablakov anchor.

 

OR is a great little climb. I'd be willing to escort you, but I sliced the tip of my finger in half and I want to give it a week to 'reanneal.' PM me if you want to go in November.

 

-t

Well said!

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quote:

Originally posted by Highlander:

quote:

Originally posted by thelawgoddess:

two words for now: calf raises.

two words: French Technique

more words: french technique downslope with waterfall ice crampons (meaning contact only with two big backward-sloping front points and two tiny rearpoints) is sketchy! [Wazzup]

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