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billcoe

Cargo Bikes Aka Bucket bikes

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Does Eddie Van Halen need one?

 

2.jpg

 

I think the d00ds shirt might be one of those that says: "if you can read this, my partner umm Eddie Van Halen umm - the bitch fell off the back".

 

Would one of these even make it out to exit 38 and at $1300 bucks, I'd want one that tickled a sensitive area wouldn't you? I've never seen one in either case, and thought it interesting enough to share......discuss ?

 

http://www.madsencycles.com/

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Don't know what they are called, but you can get an add-on for a normal bike that basically extends the rear wheel back about two feet, and creates some cargo space. Sorry so vague, but it too may tickle sensitive areas.

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You speak of the Xtracycle... they really aren't that great for cargo bikes. They have lots of play which becomes a real prob with heavier loads.

 

The better options are the Kona and Surly cargo frames. similar to the Xtracycle (and junk bucket bike) above, only one solid frame.

 

Better option: trailers.

 

There's thousands of pages discussing cargo bikes vs. trailers on the bike boards.

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Looks like he's about to get something caught in his rear wheel.

 

This reminds me of an idea I had a while back: to "Kropp" der Toof. Ride on up to the pass, ascend the might precipice, and ride back home. Real hardcores could prolly do it in a day, then once the idea catches on, people can start turning in ridiculously fast times. But no man-dog teams allowed like on the big R-head.

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just get a bob yak. what the fuck.bob_yak.jpg

looks like hes headed to the pawn shop

 

Looks cool, had anyone used a BoB Yak? I was trying to find a way to hitch my Kayak to the back of my bike, I see a few products out there but they all look cheesy.

Anyone done cycle/kayak combo?

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Bob yaks are cool. Not too much interaction with handling unless your hauling nuts and trying to take tight turns. I've never had a pannier rig so wouldn't know what to compare to.

 

Unclipped helmet. Gheysha sippers. And $500 in pawnables. Bucket bike yo.

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A friend of mine used a BOB a couple times for trips from Seattle down the coast to Southern Cali. He liked his.

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This reminds me of an idea I had a while back: to "Kropp" der Toof. Ride on up to the pass, ascend the might precipice, and ride back home. Real hardcores could prolly do it in a day, then once the idea catches on, people can start turning in ridiculously fast times. But no man-dog teams allowed like on the big R-head.

 

If I was in Seattle I would give that a go, sounds like fun. It is doable in a day a long tough one.

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