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Captain Crunch

Seattle Climber at the South Pole

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Hi all,

 

Just in case anyone is interested, I am spending 10 months at the South Pole through the Antartic winter. Not really climbing related, but it might be interesting to most climbers.

 

The sun went down about 2.5 months ago and will not return for 3.5 more months. The temperature is -70F and the windchill is around -105F... Actualy a warmish day at the South Pole. We have been isolated for 3.5 months now and the next plane is 5 months away. There are only 43 of use here.

 

www.freezedriedengineer.wordpress.com

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Cool, thanks for sharing. I was on ice during the past summer (Nov.-Dec. 22), but the closest I got to the pole was calling on the HF radio during snow school, and I roomed with a couple polies when I arrived at McMurdo.

 

Spent six weeks in the Dry Valleys for geology research. I have a google picasa album of a selection of my photos - it can definitely take up a couple hours of your time: http://picasaweb.google.com/davidfkiehl

 

Good luck with the rest of your winter-over!

 

-David

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Not really. The Sturgen is about 200 yards from the true pole. Even if the Sturgen was directly below the pole (and it never was), because we are essentially on a glacier we all all move 33 feet per year (including frozen Sturgen). However, the geographical pole stays in the same place.

 

Freezedriedengineer

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Sweet, Capt. Crank.

 

What the fuck is this Sturgen (sturgeon?) that you and AlpinCrotch are discussing?

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My sister worked at the South Pole cooking for all the folks stationed there.

 

My bro-in-law worked at the pole as a crane operator.

 

I believe Raytheon Corp is in charge of hiring and posts jobs

 

Raytheon (I didn't search)

 

You could also be doing Physics research and need to make observations down at the pole.

 

 

Ok here ya go this is the specific site to explore for jobs

 

Raytheon Polar Service

Edited by Feck

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