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Checat

Zero Bolt Climbing Crag

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A guide could help with the attitude test, knowing the norm at an area before you go there would help prevent the clueless from having at it, leaving only the willfully obstinate, who can be dealt with in a different manner.

 

A more relevant Supertopo topic might the one of the ones on Canon Tajo (including some RC.com jabber as well). The debate there was whether to have a guidebook at all, for an area with maybe a thousand routes and grade V walls. Dave Kennedy, a San Diego guidebook author (who did make money with his SD County guide) announced he was going to write a guide to Canon Tajo, an area he had seldom been to much less put up any routes. His motives were understood to be entirely financial. It was taken about as well as Walmart deciding that some hippy enclave was an under served market in need of a new Supercenter. John Smallwood, long time keeper of the flame and first ascent information, officially wrote up the information and filed it with Library of Congress and the Mexican equivalent, thereby copyrighting most of the route information and nipping Kennedy's guide project in the bud.

 

It wasn't a consensus decision, but the majority of the folks who climb there, including the burgeoning Mexican crew of climbers, concurred that a guide was undesirable and would reduce the spirit of adventure they've enjoyed. Its sort of as if it was decided that all of Leavenworth and the Stuart Range would not be published.

 

It isn't a bolt free area, climbers in California have long recognized bolts as valid and traditional protection dating back to John Salathe and before. It is pretty much entirely ground up first ascents with on lead drilling, though there must be a black sheep or two. Note that the desert granite lends itself to this approach better than moss ridden crags on the wet side of the Cascades. I know Paul Piana's rap drilled free version of the Pan Am wall route was chopped (and recently done again without the bolts), so the locals don't just complain on the net.

 

So, the key is a strong local ethic and an array of climbers emotionally invested in the area willing to stand behind that ethic. It's been awhile since I've been there, but it hasn't seemed to translate into a hostile local scene, rather folks are friendly and share information, and certainly John Smallwood is findable and willing to disseminate his knowledge (unless you blabber about your rap bolting plans).

 

Best of luck to you central west Oregonsters, there's no reason you can't sustain your ideal, even if route information becomes more widely available. A lack of top anchors might become a problem with increased climber traffic though, I know it's an issue at Paradise Forks and a number of other areas. There's somewhere out there (can't remember where) that land managers don't want climbers topping out at all to prevent damage to vegetation and erosion concerns.

 

 

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John Smallwood, long time keeper of the flame and first ascent information, officially wrote up the information and filed it with Library of Congress and the Mexican equivalent, thereby copyrighting most of the route information and nipping Kennedy's guide project in the bu

 

I still don't get this. Information cannot be copyrighted, only presentation? A guide to the same area, different author, same routes, with different wording cannot legally be blocked - can it?

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Yeah, I'm a little fuzzy on the specifics as well, I'm just repeating what John told me. I know there were attorneys and process servers involved, but it seems like guidebooks always piggyback on information from prior guides. I'll seek clarification.

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Hey Checat, perhaps in the meantime, while all the guidebook stuff is yet to happen, how 'bout a small, nice, wooden sign where the trail meets the crag with a short notice as to the preferred ethic and a friendly request to adhere to it? Happy climbing...

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One wood sign leads to another, and then before you know it you have the kind of situation they have at the callahans (wood signs with formation name in front of every formation), which I think is kind of cheesy...

 

Disneyfication...

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One wood sign leads to another, and then before you know it you have the kind of situation they have at the callahans (wood signs with formation name in front of every formation), which I think is kind of cheesy...

 

Disneyfication...

 

must_be_this_tall_to_ride_tshirt-p2354310511374988573lcr_400.jpg

 

Maybe Kevbone "developed" this one.

ClimbingWall3_full.jpeg

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I know this is an old thread but I feel the need to add my two cents. I know Moolack, I miss Moolack, although Leavenworth is a great place to live, I plan on getting back to Moolack. The Lack is one of the most wonderful climbing places I have been and I would hate for it to ever change. Those of you that don't know, won't know. Those of you that do know, it is our job to protect it. There is no point in arguing over bolts, if they ever appeared at the lack I can't imagine they would ever last.

The one deciding point that I have yet to read, and maybe I missed it, is that in a wilderness area there is not to be any permanent changes. Now I believe this to mean no trail building, no stairway thru the scree pile and defiantly no bolts. But I really don't know anything. I am happy that I have had the chance to experience Moolack in its raw form. It really is something to behold. Thanks to all that have made it what it is. I hope to make it back this year for a few days.

 

Criss

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