Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
scheissami

Two Person, Four Season Tent?

Recommended Posts

Checked out some of the previous threads but many of them focused on bivies or were older.

 

Anyone have the Nemo Tenshi or Mountain Hardware EV 2? I'm looking pretty closely at these two and wonder if someone's got firsthand experience with them.

 

Will be using the tent for ski-touring and climbing. I want a vestibule and a tent that has guy-out points for high winds (I have a BD firstlight, which is rad, but it isn't as burly as what I'm looking for)

 

Cheers!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got the EV2 myself a couple days ago. There is no external vestibule. The internal part of the tent is long enough for gear at your feet (hence the "integral vestibule" of their marketing hype) but if you want a true vestibule you wont get one with the EV2.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used both and have no big complaints about either. You mentioned wanting a vestibule, so doesn't that lead you to the Tenshi by default? Have never found cooking with a canister stove inside the EV2 to be a hindrance without a vestibule. Tenshi gives you more options to customize features for each outing, but you might find it a bit cramped if you are over 6'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cooking in EV2's "vestibule" is a pain since I used white gas stove. Never used a tenshi before. Since you are pretty much set on single wall, a bibler with vestibule should work pretty good for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Tenshi has a zip on vestibule like the ID, so it goes on pretty quick and seals well. The Bibler vestibule, IMO, is a pain to use in comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Tenshi and definately believe it is worth every penny. It is a well thought out tent and finely manufactured. Some of the main reasons I bought this tent vs the EV2:

 

1) Sleep Tight Anchor Transfer that lets you stay tied in while you sleep

 

2) The poles set up on the inside so you can crawl in and erect the tent (ladies love that)

 

3) The vestibue can be ditched to streamline the tent. This saves weight and makes for a smaller footprint.

 

4) The condensation curtain works great.

 

5) Smaller company that can use the business.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are the MH Evo 2 and Tenshi fully seam sealed?

 

As far as the attachable vestibules go, well, the BD firstlight has one and it kinda sucks when it's really windy. The gaps between the vestibule and tent let's wind and precip in, which kinda defeats the purpose.

 

Thanks for all of the feedback so far...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know about the EV2, but my Tenshi wasn't seam sealed. I had to do it myself. Also, the Tenshi's vestibule has these flaps along the edges that go under the snow so spindrift doesn't get inside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Tenshi seems pretty rad. What's the fabric like? Does it compare to the BD superlight tents or is it more burly/waterproof?

 

I also noticed the Marmot Alpinist, which has an integrated vestibule (which, unlike the MH one has a separate door and no floor), is fully seam-taped, has "knees" at the corner to keep the walls off your face, and is about $200 cheaper. Anybody used one of these?

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wrote a review of the Alpinist (both the original and the current model) here a little while ago - do a search for it. It sucks. Big time

I returned it to REI and got a SD Convert 2, which got rave reviews from Alpinist magazine, and rave reviews from me too.

convert 2 review

 

 

 

Edited by EastCoastBastard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wrote a review of the Alpinist (both the original and the current model) here a little while ago - do a search for it. It sucks. Big time

I returned it to REI and got a SD Convert 2, which got rave reviews from Alpinist magazine, and rave reviews from me too.

convert 2 review

 

 

glad to hear you like the convert 2 as I just bought one to replace my walrus rappeed xv. Are you going to review it? thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I don't think I'm going to review the Convert 2 - Alpinist did a good job, and there are some other reviews floating around the internet (also positive). I couldn't find anything on the Marmot tents, so I wrote the review.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ended up getting the MH EV2 since I was able to get a good deal on it. I used it on my trip to Crater Lake last week. It was pretty warm weather with no precip so I didn't really get to test it in winter conditions.

 

It's fully seam sealed, which you could argue isn't necessary in a cold weather tent. It's super burly and pitches out very sturdy but is still pretty lightweight. I looked at Bibler tents and the Tenshi closely, but wanted to try something new (I have the BD Firstlight, which is rad); I like the external clips for the poles, makes pitching really easy.

 

Because of the integrated vestibule, you have to take some care to keep snow out and the tent dry, but there is plenty of room inside. The benefit is that there's no extra material to bring or set-up. The first night temps dropped into the 20s and there was some condensation despite having the vents open, but nothing outrageous.

 

Overall I'm fairly satisfied with the tent, though it really is only a one-season tent. I think the Tenshi and Bibler tents are likely more versatile, but for lightweight three-season alpine I already have my BD Firstlight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had my Hilleberg Allak up at Muir a couple weekends ago. It was blowing 50-60 consistently and gusting up to 75 ish. I had to dig it out a few times during the night, but it held up great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×