Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
Lowell_Skoog

1930s Mystery Wall - Do you recognize it?

Recommended Posts

I'm not a geologist - does Lundin consist of metavolcanic rock?

The background in the last two photos in Lowell's post #864779 almost looks like some of that terrain around Red Mtn and Lundin. Wolf may be right.

I snowshoed into Red Mtn yesterday, and no camera - duh. A very nice day in CWB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The eastern shoulder of Lundin is supposed to be sandstone and volcs like Red mtn, but the western side of the peak is granodiorite. I think I recall the rock changes right around the summit.

 

I still don't think the background topography behind the rappeler is around Lundin (at least not looking south) but,has anyone done the rappel into commonwealth basin from the eastern shoulder of Lundin? I believe the wall trends due south for a short section around where the rap is supposed to be and it may be that Guye would be in the background from that location.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking of the TOPO that Lowell shows in post #865282 with the wall (red arrow), and the view (yellow arrow) toward Red. I didn't go that far up in the valley to see for sure. But was wondering if the rock there would be consistent with the old photos. I'm thinking that Wolf's memory is pretty good about it being Lundin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The density of gray matter working on this project has started to draw into orbit those of us on the periphery with our circumferential evidence.

 

1. Wolf Bauer did translations from German.

2. G-Spotter's etheric receptors came up with Das Toof.

 

Ergo ipso factoid.

 

It seems that the mystery location could have been chosen by the photographer. The angular rock features are striking. As Stefan says the photographer has a vantage at or slightly above the climbers.

 

There is no overview of the crag. It might be quite small.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lowell, the other photographs really remind me of rock faces I've seen up the Icicle and in the Enchantment region. The vegetation shown underfoot in the first picture you posted also looks like something from the east side of the Cascades.

 

Do you have a larger version of that first picture? Or larger versions of the other pics that show the slope in the background? Maybe some tweaking in Photoshop might reveal a familiar slope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lowell, the other photographs really remind me of rock faces I've seen up the Icicle and in the Enchantment region. The vegetation shown underfoot in the first picture you posted also looks like something from the east side of the Cascades.

 

Do you have a larger version of that first picture? Or larger versions of the other pics that show the slope in the background? Maybe some tweaking in Photoshop might reveal a familiar slope.

 

Thanks for the ideas, Mike. Unfortunately, I've placed the Dickert collection back in the Mountaineers Archives for now, so I don't have the pictures at home for re-scanning.

 

Thinking about it a little more, I'm skeptical that the crag is in the Icicle or the Enchantment region, merely for logistical reasons. In 1935, I think it was a lot more trouble for people to drive from Seattle all the way to the Leavenworth area to climb. As far as I know, cragging in the Leavenworth area really didn't get going until after WWII, driven by Fred Beckey and his friends. I'm doubtful that Wolf Bauer would have gone there to practice rock techniques. I don't recall Wolf ever mentioning the Leavenworth area in my conversations with him and in the various oral histories that I've listened to.

 

I'm not saying it's impossible, but I'm doubtful.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×