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The Viaduct a historic landmark?

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McQ used to use the Alaska Way Viaduct a lot.

 

I can't find a video where he starts the final car chase on the Alaska Way Viaduct. Back then you could Race down 99 then exit and end up on a beach on the Olympic Peninsula.

 

Here's the best I could do with some historic I-5 way before they built let alone demolished the King Dome.

 

PvluHfTVrdU

 

It makes me sad. Cars in the 70s used to rule. That and I-90 ended at Rainier Ave. Back in the day. :cry:

 

 

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Crazed with grief after his wife commits suicide, Paul, an American expatriate, roams the streets of Paris until, while apartment hunting, he faces Jeanne, an unknown girl across an empty room. Brutally, without a word, he rapes the soon-compliant stranger. It should have been hit-and-run sex, but Paul stays at the scene of the erotic accident. While arranging his wife's funeral, Paul leases the apartment where he is to meet the puzzled girl for a series of frenzied afternoons. "No names here," he roughly tells her, setting up the rules of the game. They are to shut out the world outside, forfeit their pasts and their identities. Paul degrades Jeanne in every possible way, leveling all her inhibitions with sheer brutality. Paul is soon dissatisfied with mere possession of her body; he must also have her mind. When she rejects his mad love to enter a comfortable marriage with her dull fiancé, Paul finally confesses: "I love you, you dummy."

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Oly, if you're going to make non sequitur posts, please limit them to pictures of 70s chicks with erect nips, m'kay?

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The Last Tango in Paris, the movie showing in the pic above ;)

 

Sophisticated. I may have understood your reference better if you'd just posted this picture:

23048359.jpg

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this whole seattle landmark thing has gone way too far:

 

450chubbyandtubby_building.jpg

 

^^^ this is not a freaking landmark ^^^ you latte sipping goatee wearing lesbian loving birkenstock stompin pathetic wannabes. it's an old closed down store.

 

why do seattleites feel the need to venorate any and every old pile of bricks like it's their only claim to authenticity?

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If we want to go back in time then we need to rename a few things.

 

A big chunk of the area around Rainier Ave should be given the official name Garlic Gulch.

 

On thing that isn't very nice, but would keep with the old time, is the north end of Madison Valley should be known as Coon Hollow.

 

In addition to building his own house, Grose subdivided the rest of his 12 acres, giving lots to family and friends, selling others.

 

Calvin Schmid, a professor emeritus at the UW and author of seminal sociological studies on the city, wrote that Grose's move was a key event in the history of the African-American community.

 

"When Mr. Gross (sic) settled on the hill with his family," Schmid wrote, "other Negroes moved into the area. There was much opposition to this migration on the part of the white residents of the Madison area. Finally they decided to sell, but not to rent to the newcomers. Most of the incoming Negroes moved to the top of the hill, but a few bought and settled in the hollow to the east."

 

Schmid's original version of this text referred to the "migration" as an invasion. It couldn't have been much of one. There were fewer than 500 African Americans in the entire state at the time.

 

The hollow to which Schmid referred is now called Madison Valley. It was then called Coon Hollow; it isn't entirely clear whether this was a name derived from native wildlife - raccoons, which were plentiful - or pejoratively from what many white residents clearly thought a new sort of wildlife - black people.

 

Whichever, the hollow was not the preferred area for living. It was once described by a local resident as "a swamp and a mudhole," and that pretty well captured it.

 

 

Source, other than stories from my dad

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why do seattleites feel the need to venorate any and every old pile of bricks like it's their only claim to authenticity?

 

Because the entire city is turning into a mixed use development?

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