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grandpa

Muir Snowfield Hike

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Hello, I'm hiking up to Camp Muir early July, taking my son and two nephews (the guys in their 30's, me a bit over that). None of us have been there before, so I'm asking what is a realistic guestimate of the time to go up and get back down. Need to start early, camp over night nearby, what do you say?

 

thanks,

 

grandpa

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round trip...

 

If yr in good (climbers) shape, up and down in 3-5 hours might be in the ball park.

 

If yr a weekend hiker (or less) , it might be double that.

 

In good conditions, you can practically fly up with light boots on and little els.

 

In bad conditions, it can turn into a long scary slog and if you werent prepared with the right gear you might disappear - as a number of folks have done in the past.

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Old-timer, ;)

 

I would just get an early start to enjoy the morning, and the firmer snow conditions. No need to camp unless it's something you really want to do. Don't know about you, but after spending ten years in the infantry I like sleeping in a bed as often, and as much as possible.

 

The hike itself is pretty unique as far as hikes go. In July you'll have plenty of daylight, and plenty of people around you.

 

Take as long as you need or want. Just carry plenty of water and sunscreen. Enjoy the views, and go on a bluebird day if you can.

 

Man I miss home.

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Thanks to both of you. We're planning on a daytrip, preparing for overnight if all else fails. If WX goes bad, down we go. Yes, plenty of water and sunscreen is in the plan.

 

Dave

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and remember the responses you received from your first thread on this topic.

 

Your ability to navigate in a whiteout cannot be overemphasized. See the news item linked in CascadesHiker's post immediately above. That happened just today. This is not an uncommon occurrence on this snowfield. Download the GYB sheet and know how to use a map and compass or a GPS. Now go out there and have some fun!!!1

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Whiteout navigation. Good plan. I do that here every winter, but then I'm on a road also. It'll be quite different on foot, with no "path". I have the maps, compass, and a GPS or two, although I'm trying to get my son to not rely on "hi-tech" only.

 

I'm aware of some of the hazards, don't want to become intimately aware of any. I appreciate the link to the story on KING-5, I sent it to the three kids, want to make an impression, to prepare mentally as well as physically/hardware-wise.

 

Fun! Yes, that's the second goal. First is to get back to the car, and I've explained this to the guys. I can hardly wait!

 

Thanks for all the advice.

 

Grandpa

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