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grandpa

Muir Snowfield

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Having never been up this trail, and planning on it sometime this summer (late June, perhaps), what is the recommended hiking hardware? Good boots ok, or should I/we carry crampons also? How about hiking poles? What else? Only planning on a day trip, have no intention of overnighting. If WX turns bad, back down we go, pronto.

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Here is some info. In late June it will probably be half snow. Chances are you don't need crampons, the snowfield is not very steep, but it kind of depends on the snow conditions and your expertise. Poles are a good idea if you like poles. Edited by counterfeitfake

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People sometimes become disoriented on the Muir route, especially when poor weather closes in, which can happen suddenly. Pay close attention to terrain and landmarks on your way up, but keep in mind that they can disappear if the clouds close in. I wouldn't carry crampons, but poles could be handy. It's a trudge ...lots of one foot in front of the other.

 

Also, drink extra water and take extra deep breaths. Climbing up to 10,000 ft. can result in some nausea due to altitude. Dehydration can contribute to such illness.

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As CFF and Skeezix have pointed out/implied, print off the Get Your Bearings sheet and take it with you, and a device with which to use it (compass or GPS). It should be intuitively obvious to know how to use the chosen device(s). Other than that, stay hydrated and have fun! And sunscreen - LOTS of sunscreen. And sunglasses, with side shields. And - well, you get the idea...

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Since the faker quoted my earlier post...

 

Make sure you know how to use a compass....I find that's the single most neglected skill these days with GPS.

 

I'm going up to Muir shortly, as soon as I get the time!

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Having never been up this trail, and planning on it sometime this summer (late June, perhaps), what is the recommended hiking hardware? Good boots ok, or should I/we carry crampons also? How about hiking poles? What else? Only planning on a day trip, have no intention of overnighting. If WX turns bad, back down we go, pronto.

 

I've never needed crampons on the Muir Snowfield. I've hit some nasty icy sections in late September, but even then, they were possible to avoid or just move over carefully.

 

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People sometimes become disoriented on the Muir route, especially when poor weather closes in, which can happen suddenly.

 

I've seen this, and expect it. I grew up out there, but haven't lived there for nearly 40 years.

 

Pay close attention to terrain and landmarks on your way up, but keep in mind that they can disappear if the clouds close in.

 

Yeah, I learned to navigate this way when following dad out deer/elk hunting in the Oregon cascades. The compass is my friend, have a GPS for fun and backup though.

 

 

I wouldn't carry crampons, but poles could be handy. It's a trudge ...lots of one foot in front of the other.

 

Ok, good answer, it's one thing I've been wondering about. And the trudge sounds like a good reason to stop and look around...often. That's what I'm up there for. And LOTS of pictures.

 

Also, drink extra water and take extra deep breaths. Climbing up to 10,000 ft. can result in some nausea due to altitude. Dehydration can contribute to such illness.

 

Yeah, I figure on the hydration, and so far (knock on wood)10K hasn't been a problem, although I've only sepnt a couple of hours at that elevation a few times.

 

Thanks all for all the advice/ideas, I can hardly wait!

 

Grandpa.

 

 

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