Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
TERRAPIN

Outdoor Filmaking Training?

Recommended Posts

Hey fellow mountain folks,

So I'm trying my best to get into ethnographic/ documentary filmmaking. If anyone knows a place that does this sort of thing in the NW Washington area, please let me know. If any of you cyber dudes knows how to work with editing software (ie. final cut pro, adobe premiere, etc.), I would greatly appreciate learning from you. I have been filming with a Cannon ZR 25 and have some footage to work with. I want to do a lot of climbing/ mountaineering work in the Cascades this summer. Ultimately I want to return to Nepal, where I studied for a while, and do video work over there. Contact me at:

christopherbadgett@hotmail.com

Thanks,

Chris grin.gif" border="0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try the 911 Media Arts Center next to Feathered Friends in Seattle. They offer all sorts of scripting, documentary making, and video editing classes. Some of the newer DV editing software is pretty inexpensive and really easy to use. I've played around with Pinnacle's older program using a analog video and got okay results. I hear their DV version (<$100 retail) is much better. You can obviously go high end with other equipment but if you are just learning and have a decent modern PC with a big hard drive (~ 40 to 80 GB) then you can do well. The equipment and learning to use it isn't the hard part...getting good footage and having a decent story to tell is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

911 is a great place to start. There are some good books out there that can help. One of your best teachers is the TV- watch the kind of shows you'd like to make and consider what went into making it, it's a lot more complex than it looks and takes commitment. AJ is right about getting good footage and telling a story being the most important part. I've seen people blow thousands on equipment only to be disappointed in the results because they didn't know how to go about it. Take the camera along on local trips and do a couple of shorts about climbing at index or a day hike. You'll find find out what shots you missed that would've really helped and what you got that worked. Start small and take the easy lessons before you dive into a big overseas project. Good luck and good shooting!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Terrapin,

I was surfing 911's site and ran across this post.

Date: 03/19/02Name: Matt SzundyEmail Address: film@theascendingpath.comCity: SeattleItem: Mountain ConsultantComment: I offer all aspects of climbing related film consulting. Including: stunt performing, mountain safety coordinating, rigging and locations. www.theascendingpath.com See you in the mountains!

Thought it might be a good contact for beta/intern/PA type stuff. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took a year of classes in videography and really enjoyed them. Believe it or not, a photography class really helped me too, lots of tips about how to turn crappy subjects into asthetically pleasing images. I got a TV tuner card and video editing software that suits my needs just fine for $100.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ethnography/documentary huh.

"gentle giants of the mist: the cascade climbers, last surviving white trash tribe of the PNW" shocked.gif" border="0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×