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spidergirl

footbeds to prevent shin bang?

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Has anyone used footbeds in their plastic boots to prevent shin bang? I got really bad shin bang climbing Mt. Washington last winter. My local shop recommended using Aline footbeds to prevent the shin bang.

 

I'm wary of trying these in case I were to get shin bang again (I was in so much pain by the end of the day). Am I better off getting insulated non-plastic mtneering boots?

 

I do want to get something soon because I've been winter hiking in my leather backpacking boots. My feet end up cold and wet by day’s end, and a bit sore from my crampons....

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Footbeds will probably make your boots fit better, particularly if you have a narrow foot, or high arch (as I do). I presume you are wearing thick socks for insulation. When the boot actually fits your foot, you should not have a problem with shin bang. As a beginning climber using rented plastic boots, I had this problem a couple of time. Miserable. But I did get a better quality insole (more contoured) and did buy my own plastic boots, same model as the rented ones. Did not have the problem again. Plastic boots are very desirable for long glacier routes or overnight routes on snow. I presume you are currently renting plastic boots, so I would recommend purchasing your own high quality (contoured) insoles, and sizing the boots so they are not too large. Also, you should lace so that the foot section is "locked tight", and the upper section can be looser so that your ankle is more free to flex. At least that's the way I do it.

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Footbeds wont help.

 

People new to plastic boots/stiff boots will commonly lace the boot up super tight including the upper portion which is what causes shin bang. You dont actually have to lace the upper portion of the boot super tight if just hiking/mountaineering. I dont lace the upper portion of my boots unless I am climbing steep terrain that will require some amount of front pointing.

 

Also learning the "duck" or "frankenstein" walk will help.

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I agree with what John says. Leave the upper portion of the boot unlaced until you get to more technical terrain. In addition, slapping a piece of duct tape on your shin where the boot rubs can help alleviate any friction when you do lace it up.

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Thank you, everyone, for all the tips! I wondered about the lacing. On the last winter hike I did, I ran into two separate guys who had my same boots. I asked if they get shin bang and one said "no, but I lace mine really tight" and the other said "no, but I lace mine really loose". Now I'll keep the upper part looser for most of the time!

 

Robertjoy, I might take my boots in to try on footbeds. I think I have high arches, too. I know the boots are the right size but maybe the footbeds would make them fit even better. Doesn't hurt to try, I guess.

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Getting well fit insulated non-plastics will improve your life in this and so many other ways.

 

But plastic has some good uses too, just don't burn it..

 

 

 

 

 

__________________________

Any new rock climbing techniques?? Share Share

 

 

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robertjoy, JohnFrieh and rbw1966-

 

Just wanted to thank you for the tips on shin bang. I climbed the last two weekends in my Koflachs and had no shin bang. This past weekend I had two long days with lots of steep climbing and they were so comfortable (and warm! I’m still amazed I can climb in below zero temps and have warm feet).

 

I did get A-line footbeds (comfortable and kept my feet from sliding around, especially going down). I also kept the top part of the boot laced really loosely.

 

I might still get non-plastics at some point but for now, these are great. Thanks again!

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