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tony.henley

looking for people to climb rainer

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frist time to climb rainer have all the nesseary gear I need. looking for some one to go thought my gear to make sure I have all I need am free alot to climb and can climb this weekend, dont have to be back until late wed 01/23 my phone is 719-287-2045 call any time 24/7/365

Edited by tony.henley

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well - so long as you're going to do your first ascent in winter might as well do it by the willis wall! don't forget your snowboard!

 

actually, if you can make it stop snowing for months on end i'll go w/ you...

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yes why is that intersting

When someone is asking for advice on whether or not they have the right gear it's pretty easy to assume that maybe that person should get a little more real experience before taking on such a potentially dangerous climb as Rainier in winter. Perhaps you have much more experience than you are letting on though? Even in the summer, peaks like Rainier and Hood can be quite a dangerous place to learn life lessons. Winter ups the anti a few notches. Good luck though.

 

I'm sure you've already looked at some sites like this to help you figure out what you need? Mt Rainier Linky

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well I didnt make the summit but I did make it to muir or close it eas 10:10 pm by the time I made it to 10100 plus feet and was tired and cold so I dug my snow cave and unpacked my sleeping bag and found that my other water bottle had some how sprung a leak and gotten my bag wet along the whole length of the zipper and baffle were soaking wet I had to use my belay jacket and all of my extra cloths and my stove at one point to stay warm but, aside from all of that I made it out with only minor frost nip on face and hands and minor frost bite on my toes no doctor visit needed so all and all it was a horbile trip but it could have been alot worse and before all of you tell me how stupid I am for going alone, in the winter etc I know.

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well I didnt make the summit but I did make it to muir or close it eas 10:10 pm by the time I made it to 10100 plus feet and was tired and cold so I dug my snow cave and unpacked my sleeping bag and found that my other water bottle had some how sprung a leak and gotten my bag wet along the whole length of the zipper and baffle were soaking wet I had to use my belay jacket and all of my extra cloths and my stove at one point to stay warm but, aside from all of that I made it out with only minor frost nip on face and hands and minor frost bite on my toes no doctor visit needed so all and all it was a horbile trip but it could have been alot worse and before all of you tell me how stupid I am for going alone, in the winter etc I know.

 

it's a good idea to pack your sleeping bag in a plastic bag. Ditto for spare clothes.

 

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Good job Tony. Much of becoming a great climber is having the knuts to push your comfort zone; but much is also making sure that you have the knowledge required to make it back to tell the story. You can get a lot of advice and knowledge in these forums, but only you can provide the knuts.

 

I have no idea what your skills are, but if you need any updating in your rock skills you can meet me at Vantage nearly eny weekend this spring and I will teach you whatever you want to know.

 

Keep pushing, and keep returning from the climbs.

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thanks alot they were packed in water proff bags they flowed thogh the opening hole and as far as rock goes I only have two questions well actuly 3 sport or trad, where, and when I am so down!!!

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If you look using the search function, you should be able to find some trip reports on winter ascents of Rainier on this site if you go back far enough. They should give you a feel for what is involved.

 

Basically it comes down to waiting until snow conditions (esp. avy conditions) and weather come together and going then. You have to be in top shape, well equipped, and have a strong team. You have to go at the drop of a hat, even if it means ditching work or whatever committments you have when the conditions are right.

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I think I met Mr. Tony last weekend in Longmire as he was getting ready to head up to Muir. He's a friendly, enthusiastic, strong, army-guy and he seems to have some good winter gear, including one of them personal locator-beacon thangs.

 

 

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Tony, Your enthusiasm is pissing people off. Why do you think you can just start posting about actually climbing something before you have the approval of the people who post here so much they can't climb?

That's like so whatever.

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Tony, Your enthusiasm is pissing people off. Why do you think you can just start posting about actually climbing something before you have the approval of the people who post here so much they can't climb?

That's like so whatever.

So I guess if Tony is successful and makes it back down, all the nay-sayers will have to come up with some other reason why he should not be climbing. After all, when someone can just go out and climb a big peak with out all the presumed prerequisite stuff everyone else is saying he do, I'm guessing that will be a crushing blow to some of the elitist egos out there. Climbing seems to be one of those sports that people like to think only themselves, and maybe certain others, are qualified for such "extreme" activities. If something goes wrong there will be plenty of "I told you so" armchair quarterbacks. But bad shit can, and has happened plenty of times, to some of the best and most qualified climbers out there. Sometimes I think more experience is not necessarily a good thing either. People start thinking they know it all and/or just get careless and sloppy. Good luck Tony. Do your homework, be careful up there and know when to heed to the mountain. It will always be there for another attempt.

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thanks much, and as an example look at I cant rember his name off hand he was climbimg el cap and he feel no big except his belay loop was shot feel to his death and he was a pro and I will summit no if ands or buts I have time lots of time and I will heed the MT but I will bend its will.

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Good luck Tony. Do your homework, be careful up there and know when to heed to the mountain. It will always be there for another attempt.

 

hehheheeeh... a ranger told me the same thing one time when i was hiking up from ipsut. she said to stay off the glacier (for safety presumably) and that the mountain will always be there for the next time.

 

the first part: sound safety advice but prolly against park rules to tell a visitor to stay off them. the second part: as good as the adage sounds, some mountains (in this case, mountain ranges) wont always be there the next time. st helens comes to mind... ;)

Edited by snowball

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Good luck Tony. Do your homework, be careful up there and know when to heed to the mountain. It will always be there for another attempt.

the second part: as good as the adage sounds, some mountains (in this case, mountain ranges) wont always be there the next time. st helens comes to mind... ;)

Hmmm, last time I cheched, St. Helens was still there. Maybe a slightly modified version, but still there none the less. Chances are pretty good that MOST mountains are gonna be around for another shot. I guess on my next summit bid that will be one more thing I will have to weigh if it's a tough decision to continue or not. Let's see, weather coming in fast, zero visibility, but she might blow her top before next trip so lets go for it. :lmao: ..

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Rainier in winter is serious. Can you live in a snow cave for days? Can you wake up every hour during the night to clear the air hole while the storm is trying to cover it up? If and when you run out of food/fuel can you descend with 30' visibility in a storm?

 

Climb it in summer first, it's still serious even then.

 

I've never got lucky in winter. Got to 12,000' once and there was a steady 60mph wind, higher at the summit. And that was good conditions. Usually it's just snowing.

 

Even the highly experienced are rolling the dice in winter.

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thanks and to answer your Q's I belive I can it sunds like being in iraq excpt colder (lol) in all seriousness I want to try and if I dont sumit well if at frist you dont try try again.

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